Chapter 1: Education and Student Life
Part 1  Education: A Reflection of Society <ul><li>Strategy: Getting meaning from context </li></ul><ul><li>1.  On the one...
Strategy: Getting meaning from context <ul><li>3. There are many more schools in cities than in  rural  areas. </li></ul><...
Strategy: Getting meaning from context <ul><li>6. Results on these exams affect the  entire  family because there is high ...
Previewing the Topic (p. 4) <ul><li>Where is each scene taking place? What is happening? </li></ul><ul><li>What might be s...
Understanding Reading Structure <ul><li>F </li></ul><ul><li>C </li></ul><ul><li>E </li></ul><ul><li>B </li></ul><ul><li>D ...
Skimming for the Topic and Main Idea <ul><li>To skim, read the title and any subheadings, look at any photos and diagrams,...
Skimming for the Topic and Main Idea <ul><li>The topic of the paragraph = what the paragraph is all about.  </li></ul><ul>...
Identifying the Main Idea <ul><li>A reading passage may include many subordinate ideas, but there is  only one main idea ....
Identifying the Main Idea <ul><li>The main idea is usually stated in a sentence or sentences in the first paragraphs of a ...
Identifying the Main Idea <ul><li>Paragraph A: </li></ul><ul><li>The educational system is a mirror that reflects the cult...
Organizing Information:  Using a T-Chart <ul><li>One way to organize the information in the readings that present both pos...
Organizing information: Using a T-chart <ul><li>Mexico </li></ul><ul><li>education is free, compulsory, and universal </li...
Organizing information: Using a T-chart <ul><li>Japan </li></ul><ul><li>88% finish high school </li></ul><ul><li>•  public...
Organizing information: Using a T-chart <ul><li>Britain </li></ul><ul><li>all state school – primary, secondary, and unive...
Organizing information: Using a T-chart <ul><li>US </li></ul><ul><li>primary and secondary schools are free </li></ul><ul>...
Checking your vocabulary <ul><li>1. constitution </li></ul><ul><li>2. native / indigenous people </li></ul><ul><li>3. isol...
Understanding “Politically Correct” Language <ul><li>Politically correct (or PC) language is a term used to describe a lan...
Understanding “Politically Correct” Language <ul><li>Other (funny) examples </li></ul>Words and Phrases Politically Correc...
Education in North America and Asia <ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><li>The  blind  student couldn’t cross the street. </li>...
Understanding “Politically Correct” Language <ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><li>The  blind  student couldn’t cross the stre...
Buicks, Starbucks and Fried Chicken: Still China?  <ul><li>Previewing the text: </li></ul><ul><li>What does the title of “...
Buicks, Starbucks and Fried Chicken: Still China?  <ul><li>Read the four sentences below. Put a check mark next to the sen...
Buicks, Starbucks and Fried Chicken: Still China?  <ul><li>Match  each of the sentences above that you did not choose with...
Buicks, Starbucks and Fried Chicken: Still China?  <ul><li>Reread the first five paragraphs of the reading. Find and under...
Homework <ul><li>Exercise 1 (p.18) and 2 (p.19) </li></ul><ul><li>Read an article on page 27-29. Circle words that you do ...
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Chapter 1

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Chapter 1

  1. 1. Chapter 1: Education and Student Life
  2. 2. Part 1 Education: A Reflection of Society <ul><li>Strategy: Getting meaning from context </li></ul><ul><li>1. On the one hand , there are many advantages to this system. On the other hand , there are also several drawbacks. </li></ul><ul><li>on the one hand = from one point of view </li></ul><ul><li>on the other hand = from another point of view </li></ul><ul><li>2. In a number of countries, education is both compulsory – required – and universal , available to every one, at least in primary school (elementary school) </li></ul><ul><li>compulsory = required </li></ul><ul><li>universal = available to everyone </li></ul><ul><li>primary school = elementary school </li></ul>
  3. 3. Strategy: Getting meaning from context <ul><li>3. There are many more schools in cities than in rural areas. </li></ul><ul><li>rural = country, or not urban </li></ul><ul><li>4. Public schools are all both free and egalitarian ; all students are considered equal and learn the same material. </li></ul><ul><li>egalitarian = equal </li></ul><ul><li>5. College students need great discipline ; in order to make time for their studies, they need the self-control to give up hobbies, sports, and social life. </li></ul><ul><li>discipline = self-control </li></ul>
  4. 4. Strategy: Getting meaning from context <ul><li>6. Results on these exams affect the entire family because there is high status , or social position, for a whole family in which children have high test scores. </li></ul><ul><li>entire = whole </li></ul><ul><li>status = social position </li></ul><ul><li>7. Students themselves decide if they want college-preparatory or vocational classes in high school; no national exam determines this for them. </li></ul><ul><li>determines = decides </li></ul>
  5. 5. Previewing the Topic (p. 4) <ul><li>Where is each scene taking place? What is happening? </li></ul><ul><li>What might be similar about education in these countries? Make guesses. </li></ul><ul><li>What might be different about education in these countries? Make guesses. </li></ul>Read the first paragraph on page 7 and identify the topic of this paragraph.
  6. 6. Understanding Reading Structure <ul><li>F </li></ul><ul><li>C </li></ul><ul><li>E </li></ul><ul><li>B </li></ul><ul><li>D </li></ul><ul><li>A </li></ul>
  7. 7. Skimming for the Topic and Main Idea <ul><li>To skim, read the title and any subheadings, look at any photos and diagrams, read the first two and the last two sentences of each paragraph, read quickly, and don’t read every word . </li></ul>
  8. 8. Skimming for the Topic and Main Idea <ul><li>The topic of the paragraph = what the paragraph is all about. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is a noun or noun phrase – NOT a sentence!! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The topic is a part of a main idea. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>See page 12 </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Identifying the Main Idea <ul><li>A reading passage may include many subordinate ideas, but there is only one main idea . </li></ul><ul><li>Your main idea should tell the author’s idea about the whole reading, not just part of the reading. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not too general and too specific. </li></ul></ul>The main point, thought, or opinion that the author has about the topic.
  10. 10. Identifying the Main Idea <ul><li>The main idea is usually stated in a sentence or sentences in the first paragraphs of a reading. However, it is possible that the main idea may not appear at all because the author does not state it directly in the text. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Identifying the Main Idea <ul><li>Paragraph A: </li></ul><ul><li>The educational system is a mirror that reflects the culture. </li></ul><ul><li>Paragraph F: </li></ul><ul><li>It is clear that each educational system is a reflection of the larger culture – both positive and negative aspects of its economy, values, and social structure. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Organizing Information: Using a T-Chart <ul><li>One way to organize the information in the readings that present both positive and negative aspects of something is a T-chart . </li></ul><ul><li>This chart allows you to better assimilate and recall information at a later date. </li></ul>The reason why it is called a T-chart because it is shaped like the letter T.
  13. 13. Organizing information: Using a T-chart <ul><li>Mexico </li></ul><ul><li>education is free, compulsory, and universal </li></ul><ul><li>• supports national unity </li></ul><ul><li>• leads to social, economic, and cultural improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Mexico </li></ul><ul><li>difficult to provide education in rural areas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>not enough schools or teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>some native people don’t include school attendance (=they don’t go to school) </li></ul></ul>Negative Positive
  14. 14. Organizing information: Using a T-chart <ul><li>Japan </li></ul><ul><li>88% finish high school </li></ul><ul><li>• public schools are free and egalitarian </li></ul><ul><li>• children with high test scores bring high status to family </li></ul><ul><li>Japan </li></ul><ul><li>difficult exams </li></ul><ul><li>students need discipline </li></ul>Negative Positive
  15. 15. Organizing information: Using a T-chart <ul><li>Britain </li></ul><ul><li>all state school – primary, secondary, and universities – are free </li></ul><ul><li>the first 9 years are egalitarian </li></ul><ul><li>graduates from good universities get best jobs </li></ul><ul><li>Britain </li></ul><ul><li>students take national exam at age 11 </li></ul><ul><li>half of Oxford/Cambridge students come from upper-class </li></ul>Negative Positive
  16. 16. Organizing information: Using a T-chart <ul><li>US </li></ul><ul><li>primary and secondary schools are free </li></ul><ul><li>80% are high school graduates </li></ul><ul><li>students decide on college or vocational classes </li></ul><ul><li>60% attend college </li></ul><ul><li>adults also attend college </li></ul><ul><li>US </li></ul><ul><li>schools are not equal </li></ul><ul><li>problems in U.S. school </li></ul><ul><li>schools in poor areas receive less money </li></ul>Negative Positive
  17. 17. Checking your vocabulary <ul><li>1. constitution </li></ul><ul><li>2. native / indigenous people </li></ul><ul><li>3. isolated </li></ul><ul><li>4. vocational </li></ul><ul><li>5. afford </li></ul><ul><li>6. tuition </li></ul><ul><li>7. aspects </li></ul>
  18. 18. Understanding “Politically Correct” Language <ul><li>Politically correct (or PC) language is a term used to describe a language that is regarded as “correct” because it tires not to offend people. </li></ul><ul><li>It is an attempt to use language that shows respect for different people, cultures, physical characteristics, and lifestyles. </li></ul><ul><li>Many people attempt to use this language as a sign of respect, but some feel that they have to be too careful and that “things have gone too far.” </li></ul>
  19. 19. Understanding “Politically Correct” Language <ul><li>Other (funny) examples </li></ul>Words and Phrases Politically Correct Words and Phrases Worst Least Best Housewife Domestic Engineer Unemployed   Involuntarily Leisured Ugly Under-attractive Waiter/Waitress Waitron Incorrect Alternative answer
  20. 20. Education in North America and Asia <ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><li>The blind student couldn’t cross the street. </li></ul><ul><li>The visually challenged student couldn’t cross the street. </li></ul>“ How do you feel about using different terms in the same context?” “ Can you think of any PC terms in your native language?”
  21. 21. Understanding “Politically Correct” Language <ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><li>The blind student couldn’t cross the street. </li></ul><ul><li>The visually changed student couldn’t cross the street. </li></ul>“ How do you feel about using different terms in the same context?” “ Can you think of any PC terms in your native language?”
  22. 22. Buicks, Starbucks and Fried Chicken: Still China? <ul><li>Previewing the text: </li></ul><ul><li>What does the title of “Buicks, Starbucks and Fried Chicken: Still China?” suggest about the topic of the reading? What might the main idea be? </li></ul>
  23. 23. Buicks, Starbucks and Fried Chicken: Still China? <ul><li>Read the four sentences below. Put a check mark next to the sentence that best expresses the main idea of this article. </li></ul><ul><li>__A. Today’s Chinese dislike U.S. products and American-style stores. </li></ul><ul><li>__B. The reading is about shopping in China. </li></ul><ul><li>__C. Many Chinese like to shop at supermarkets. </li></ul><ul><li>__D. American businesses and culture are becoming popular in China </li></ul>
  24. 24. Buicks, Starbucks and Fried Chicken: Still China? <ul><li>Match each of the sentences above that you did not choose with one of the following descriptions. Put the letter of the sentence next to the appropriate description. </li></ul><ul><li>____ This sentence is too general. It only tells what the reading is about. </li></ul><ul><li>____ This sentence is too specific. It tells only about one idea in the reading. </li></ul><ul><li>____ This sentence could be a main idea sentence, but it’s untrue, according to the reading. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Buicks, Starbucks and Fried Chicken: Still China? <ul><li>Reread the first five paragraphs of the reading. Find and underline one or more sentences that best express the overall main idea of the reading. </li></ul><ul><li>- Does more than one sentence state the main idea? </li></ul><ul><li>- Does the main idea sentence appear in the first paragraph of the reading? </li></ul>
  26. 26. Homework <ul><li>Exercise 1 (p.18) and 2 (p.19) </li></ul><ul><li>Read an article on page 27-29. Circle words that you do not know and find the meaning. </li></ul><ul><li>Reread the article “Buicks, Starbucks and Fried Chicken: Still China?” and study words which are underlined with dots. </li></ul>

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