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Anatomy of a community
 

Anatomy of a community

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Slides from the Communilytics Intensive at Web2Expo San Francisco, May 2, 2010. This looks at the anatomy of a community.

Slides from the Communilytics Intensive at Web2Expo San Francisco, May 2, 2010. This looks at the anatomy of a community.

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  • <br />
  • Think of communities as conversations. Any conversation has three fundamental elements: People talking; a subject of conversation; and a venue. <br />
  • Think of communities as conversations. Any conversation has three fundamental elements: People talking; a subject of conversation; and a venue. <br />
  • Think of communities as conversations. Any conversation has three fundamental elements: People talking; a subject of conversation; and a venue. <br />
  • <br />
  • Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group published this pyramid of engagement, showing several kinds of online participant. Some lurk; some go so far as to moderate and manage community. <br />
  • Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group published this pyramid of engagement, showing several kinds of online participant. Some lurk; some go so far as to moderate and manage community. <br />
  • Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group published this pyramid of engagement, showing several kinds of online participant. Some lurk; some go so far as to moderate and manage community. <br />
  • Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group published this pyramid of engagement, showing several kinds of online participant. Some lurk; some go so far as to moderate and manage community. <br />
  • Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group published this pyramid of engagement, showing several kinds of online participant. Some lurk; some go so far as to moderate and manage community. <br />
  • Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group published this pyramid of engagement, showing several kinds of online participant. Some lurk; some go so far as to moderate and manage community. <br />
  • Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group published this pyramid of engagement, showing several kinds of online participant. Some lurk; some go so far as to moderate and manage community. <br />
  • Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group published this pyramid of engagement, showing several kinds of online participant. Some lurk; some go so far as to moderate and manage community. <br />
  • Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group published this pyramid of engagement, showing several kinds of online participant. Some lurk; some go so far as to moderate and manage community. <br />
  • Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group published this pyramid of engagement, showing several kinds of online participant. Some lurk; some go so far as to moderate and manage community. <br />
  • Online communities exhibit power laws. A power law, or pareto curve, or the 80/20 rule, simply says there will be a lot of a few things and a few of many things. It&#x2019;s the basis for Chris Anderson&#x2019;s The Long Tail. In this example, we look at the top 100 most common last names. A few, like Smith and Jones, dominate. <br />
  • Communities are no different. Most users are disengaged; some contribute occasionally; a few are fanatics; and if you&#x2019;re unlucky, you&#x2019;ll deal with the Long Tail of Freaks from time to time -- those community members so driven that they find ways to contribute even when you don&#x2019;t want them to. <br />
  • Of course, a sudden burst of interest can lead to dramatic spikes in contributions from some community members -- as the recent release of Spore with strong DRM showed. Comments about Spore on Amazon exceeded those of all Maxis games for the past 10 years. <br />
  • The second element of a conversation is the topic. You&#x2019;ll probably have some ideas of topics that concern your business -- your company&#x2019;s name, key executives, your competitors, and your industry. <br />
  • One way to expand the range of topics is to use Google Sets to find what else is related. <br />
  • Of course, you can look at what keywords are driving traffic your way, then look into them on community platforms elsewhere. <br />
  • Because keyword data is publicly available -- it&#x2019;s part of Adwords auctions -- sites like Spyfu will show you who&#x2019;s paying for keywords (so you can see who you&#x2019;re competing with for that attention.) <br />
  • The reverse is true -- if you know a competitor&#x2019;s URL, you can see what keywords they&#x2019;re getting traffic from. All of these can be inspiration for further community research <br />
  • You can prune down the list of keywords by geography, using something like Google Insight. <br />
  • <br />
  • You might think that you can simply track back to a referring site -- in this case, Reddit.com -- to see what&#x2019;s driving traffic your way. <br />
  • The reality is that every kind of interaction is unique. Some are private, one-to-one; others are open to everyone. Some are brief snippets; others, detailed prose. <br />
  • increase chance that messages will be amplified by the community <br /> Don&#x2019;t know which social platforms will dominate <br /> Last-minute announcement goes on Twitter; detailed list goes in a blog posting; question looking for responses goes to a mailing list <br /> Monitor broad range of sites in case conversations about you&#x2014;or your competitors&#x2014;emerge <br /> The accounting department may not use the same social networks as the executive team, who may work with different tools from the folks in support. Different audiences gravitate towards different platforms. <br /> <br />

Anatomy of a community Anatomy of a community Presentation Transcript

  • The anatomy of a conversation Who, what, and where
  • Who’s talking?
  • Who’s talking? What are they saying?
  • Where are they saying it? Who’s talking? What are they saying?
  • Who’s talking?
  • Base: Global active Internet users (uses the Internet every day/other day) Note: Percent of active Internet users that do this at least weekly Source: Universal McCann Social Media Tracker Wave 3, March 2008
  • • Watch online video (59%) Watchers • Read blogs (48%) • Download podcasts (23%) Base: Global active Internet users (uses the Internet every day/other day) Note: Percent of active Internet users that do this at least weekly Source: Universal McCann Social Media Tracker Wave 3, March 2008
  • • Share online video (37%) Sharers • Update profile (35%) • Upload photos (23%) • Watch online video (59%) Watchers • Read blogs (48%) • Download podcasts (23%) Base: Global active Internet users (uses the Internet every day/other day) Note: Percent of active Internet users that do this at least weekly Source: Universal McCann Social Media Tracker Wave 3, March 2008
  • • Rate a product or service Commenters • Comment on a blog post • Write in a discussion forum • Share online video (37%) Sharers • Update profile (35%) • Upload photos (23%) • Watch online video (59%) Watchers • Read blogs (48%) • Download podcasts (23%) Base: Global active Internet users (uses the Internet every day/other day) Note: Percent of active Internet users that do this at least weekly Source: Universal McCann Social Media Tracker Wave 3, March 2008
  • Producers • Write in a blog (21%) • Upload a video (18%) • Rate a product or service Commenters • Comment on a blog post • Write in a discussion forum • Share online video (37%) Sharers • Update profile (35%) • Upload photos (23%) • Watch online video (59%) Watchers • Read blogs (48%) • Download podcasts (23%) Base: Global active Internet users (uses the Internet every day/other day) Note: Percent of active Internet users that do this at least weekly Source: Universal McCann Social Media Tracker Wave 3, March 2008
  • • Edit a wiki Curators • Moderate a forum Producers • Write in a blog (21%) • Upload a video (18%) • Rate a product or service Commenters • Comment on a blog post • Write in a discussion forum • Share online video (37%) Sharers • Update profile (35%) • Upload photos (23%) • Watch online video (59%) Watchers • Read blogs (48%) • Download podcasts (23%) Base: Global active Internet users (uses the Internet every day/other day) Note: Percent of active Internet users that do this at least weekly Source: Universal McCann Social Media Tracker Wave 3, March 2008
  • What are they talking about?
  • !
  • !
  • !
  • Where are they talking?
  • Community Detailed Email Article Blog Private post wiki Forum Google comment group Forum Linkedin post IRC profile change Blog comment Facebook Complexity status update IM Twitter Simple One to one One to many
  • Why be everywhere? Reach Early days DIfferent platforms, different messages Awareness Multiple audiences