Busniness Communication

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Busniness Communication

  1. 1. COMMUNICATION STYLESCOMMUNICATION STYLES ANDAND HOW ITS AFFECTED BY GENDERHOW ITS AFFECTED BY GENDER
  2. 2. Communication in OverallCommunication in Overall  Communication: The process of transferring meanings from sender to receiver.  However, a great many problems can result in failure to transfer meanings correctly
  3. 3. Communication style is aCommunication style is a function of communicationfunction of communication behaviorbehavior Communication behavior is a function of personality ANDAND
  4. 4. Types of communication styleTypes of communication style  Assertive Communication  Aggressive Communication  Passive Communication  Passive-Aggressive Communication
  5. 5. AssertiveAssertive Pushing hard without attacking; permits others to influence outcome; expressive and self-enhancing without intruding on others. Good eye contact; Comfortable but firm posture; Strong, steady and audible voice; Facial expressions matched to message; Appropriately serious tone; Selective interruptions to ensure understanding. Direct and explicit language; No attributions or evaluations of others’ behavior; Use of “I” statements and cooperative “we” statements. CommunicationCommunication Nonverbal Behavior Verbal BehaviorNonverbal Behavior Verbal Behavior StyleStyle Description Pattern PatternDescription Pattern Pattern Communication StylesCommunication Styles
  6. 6. CommunicationCommunication Nonverbal Behavior Verbal BehaviorNonverbal Behavior Verbal Behavior StyleStyle Description Pattern PatternDescription Pattern Pattern AggressiveAggressive Taking advantage of others; Expressive and self-enhancing at others’ expense. Glaring eye contact; Moving or leaning too close; Threatening gestures (pointing finger); Loud Voice; Frequent interruptions. Swear words and abusive language; Attributions and evaluations of others’ behavior; racists terms; Explicit threats or put-downs. Communication Styles (CCommunication Styles (Continuedontinued))
  7. 7. Communication Styles (continued)Communication Styles (continued) CommunicationCommunication Nonverbal Behavior Verbal BehaviorNonverbal Behavior Verbal Behavior StyleStyle Description Pattern PatternDescription Pattern Pattern PassivePassive Encouraging others to take advantage of us; Inhibited; Self-denying. Little eye contact; Downward glances; Slumped postures; Constantly shifting weight; Wringing hands; Weak or whiny voice. Qualifiers (“maybe,” “kind of” ); Fillers (“uh,” “you know,” “well”); Negaters (“it’s really not that important,” “I’m not sure”). Communication StylesCommunication Styles (C(Continuedontinued))
  8. 8. CommunicationCommunication Nonverbal Behavior Verbal BehaviorNonverbal Behavior Verbal Behavior StyleStyle Description Pattern PatternDescription Pattern Pattern Passive-Passive- AggressiveAggressive manipulate others to choose our way; We feel confused, unclear on how to feel; we get angry but not sure why. Later we possibly feel guilty. such as sighing; rolling of eyes; and even things like hammering on the table to express anger and aggression. Communication Styles (cCommunication Styles (continuedontinued)) smiling when angry;  use sarcasm; deny there is a problem
  9. 9. Communication style differs by Gender
  10. 10. Gender CommunicationGender Communication is Cross Cultural Communicationis Cross Cultural Communication Gender communication patterns of women and men are refined elaborated versions of the same ones evident in the childhood games of both boys and girls. Communication between men and women is like cross- cultural communication. Distinctive patterns. Different purposes. Different rules. Different understanding of how to interpret talk. Due to their different approaches between men and women , women become the relationship specialists and men the task specialists.
  11. 11. Gender DifferencesGender Differences  Women › Prefer conversation for rapport building. › Are more likely to compliment. › Emphasize politeness. › More compromising. › Less suited to responsible positions in business in upper level management role.
  12. 12. Gender DifferencesGender Differences  Men › Talk as a means to preserve independence and status by displaying knowledge and skill › Work out problems on an individualized basis › Are more directive in conversation › Are more intimidating › Call attention to their accomplishments › Tend to dominate discussions during meetings › Better suited to management
  13. 13. MEN: WOMEN: live in a world of status live in a world of connections conversations are negotiations for power conversations are negotiations for closeness want to preserve independence want to preserve intimacy seek to win, avoid failure seek closeness, avoid isolation avoid taking orders (since that means low status and loss of independence) ok with taking orders (if it is perceived as forming a connection) seek control seek understanding prefer inequality and asymmetry prefer equality and symmetry are adversarial (with conflicting goals) are synergistic (with common goals) value differences value similarities goal of conversation: transmit information goal of conversation: maintain interaction offer advice seek connection and understanding Different approaches at a Glance:
  14. 14. No matter howNo matter how important our motivesimportant our motives are, people read us byare, people read us by what they see and hearwhat they see and hear not by what we want them to see and hear
  15. 15. ByBy GROUP-4GROUP-4 Biswajit Ghosh – H12Biswajit Ghosh – H12 Neeraj Sharma – H30Neeraj Sharma – H30 Sritanu Das Mahapatra – H57Sritanu Das Mahapatra – H57 Abhisek Sahu – H3Abhisek Sahu – H3 Krishnakant Pandey – H25Krishnakant Pandey – H25 Debojit Roy – H66Debojit Roy – H66 © 2008 AIMS PGPM-H4.

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