• Save
Open access (april 2013) web 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Open access (april 2013) web 1

on

  • 771 views

Introduction to Open Access (Post Finch Report). Part 1 of a series of short 2-3 minute presentations

Introduction to Open Access (Post Finch Report). Part 1 of a series of short 2-3 minute presentations

Statistics

Views

Total Views
771
Views on SlideShare
244
Embed Views
527

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

4 Embeds 527

https://www.dur.ac.uk 296
https://cms.dur.ac.uk 164
http://www.dur.ac.uk 66
http://community.dur.ac.uk 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • There is some division over the issue of whether rights of re-use are needed now, or will develop once ‘access’ has been firmly established.Here is the definition of "open access" from the BOAI: "By 'open access' to this literature, we mean its free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself. The only constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited."

Open access (april 2013) web 1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. What is Open Access?Part 1 of “Open Access:What, why, how and recentdevelopments”james.bisset@durham.ac.uk
  • 2. what?
  • 3. “on average across the NHS, [only]about a third of relevant journalswere available free at the point ofuse”http://bit.ly/MnfGEYFinch Report (June 2012), from data originally reported inHeading for the Open Road: costs and benefits of transitions inscholarly communications, RIN, PRC, Wellcome Trust, RLUK andJISC, 2011.
  • 4. “many researchers … in smaller andless research-intensive institutions… do not have access to a sufficiently-wide range of titles”http://bit.ly/MnfGEYFinch Report (June 2012), from data originally reported in Access toscholarly content: gaps and barriers, RIN, Publishing ResearchConsortium and JISC, 2011.
  • 5. “across central Government and itsagencies, some 17% of relevant articlesare available free at the point of use.”http://bit.ly/MnfGEYFinch Report (June 2012), from data originally reported in Heading forthe Open Road: costs and benefits of transitions in scholarlycommunications, RIN, PRC, Wellcome Trust, RLUK and JISC, 2011.
  • 6. “lack of access … may mean thatadvice and inputs to policy-makingare delayed or incomplete."http://bit.ly/MnfGEYFinch Report (June 2012), from data originally reported in Rightscom.Benefits of Open Access to Scholarly Research Outputs to the PublicSector, Report for the Open Access Implementation Group, , 2012
  • 7. “the voluntary sector … [often has to]rely on reports from researchorganisations and Governmentdepartments"http://bit.ly/MnfGEYFinch Report (June 2012), from data originally reported in Office forPublic Management, Benefits of open access to scholarly researchfor VCS organisations, JISC 2012.
  • 8. An article that isOpen Accesscan befreely accessedby anyonein the worldusing aninternetconnection.
  • 9. no subscription......no login or password
  • 10. Image Credits[4] Via Flickr Creative Commons, and by jekert gwapo: Original availablehere[11] Created using http://photofunia.com/[6] Via Flickr Creative Commons, and by Darwin Bell: Original availablehere