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Beyond Academic Literature session (October 2013) slides. Delivered as part of the Durham University Researcher Development Programme. Further Training available at ...

Beyond Academic Literature session (October 2013) slides. Delivered as part of the Durham University Researcher Development Programme. Further Training available at https://www.dur.ac.uk/library/research/training/

A whistle-stop tour of resources encompassing newspapers (and news resources), Conference papers, Official Publications, e-books and Doctoral Theses.

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  • Newspapers section looks first at current news, then at historic newsOfficial Publications is a very brief addition, not previously covered, to highlight some of the ‘hidden and unique collections’ at Durham University.E-books – a basic intro to highlight the different content platforms and tools availableTheses – Looking at accessing theses both in the UK and beyond.ENTIRE SESSION accompanied by detailed hand out.
  • Point out access point from library website: Services and Sites / Other Online Resources / News ResourcesTitles range in coverage from 1980s / mid-1990s to present (although some include content from earlier than this for some titles).Lack of context (eg articles exploring different aspect of same topic may be separated) and text only (may lack fact/text boxes accompanying main article, will definitely lack accompanying images and graphics).… but, useful to search multiple titles at once, identify key articles of interest… and can then use this information to see if can access articles on publishers own site separately.InfoTrac: Gale CENGAGE Learning: Full-Text Custom Newspaper Database - Coverage for Durham Uni: - Daily Telegraph 11/99 - current - Guardian 1/96 - current - Independent 1/96 - current -Independent on Sunday 1/96 - current - Observer 1/96 - current - Sunday Telegraph 11/99 - current - Sunday Times 1/85 - current - Times 1/85 - current.N.B. – up to previous day, not todays news.Nexis UK - Much larger number of resources (international, regional, local… and including present day) - Not just newspapers… includes global newswires, business wires etc. So important to select sources carefully before searching.Factiva – explain about separate login. LikeNexis, international content. Not as much UK content if looking at regional and local titles, but still from 545 UK Newspapers. Content from publications in 22 languages.Point out option to search social media.
  • Demo: Library Catalogue searches (DawsonEra / Netlibrary / MyiLibrary)
  • Expanding your search is about two things:Thinking about all possible terms/spellings/concepts which might be applicable to what you are looking at, to ensure you don’t accidentally rule out any useful result simply due to semantics.If you have focussed a search too much, and aren’t finding the results you expect, about widening your net to see what else you can find.You’ll have some keywords in mind but as few of you will be experts in this area you will need to think about how others have framed research in this field. You will find that the keywords you use will change once you start looking for information and finding relevant resources. You can borrow their search terms and add to your list.synonyms: e.g. survey or questionnaire – make sure you don’British and American spellings: use wildcards e.g. colo?r finds colour and colortruncation: e.g. educati* finds education, educating, educationalist
  • Times Digital Archive 1785-2006Scanned pages = see news in contextSearch by article typeSearch vacuum cleaner in advertisingBritish Newspapers 1600-1900Two collections: C17th & 18th; C19thView pages or articlesVarying coverage - e.g. Newcastle Journal only one issue but Newcastle Courant over 4000 issuesAsks ‘stop running this script’ say noBrowse publication by location England NE Newcastle
  • Demo: Library Catalogue searches (DawsonEra / Netlibrary / MyiLibrary)
  • Mention coverage might be across multiple services, so always check the library catalogue (use Times Literary Supplement as an example)TLS: Archive back to 1902 available via the same platform (works in a similar way rather than actually looking the same) as infotrac. TLS, TES and ThES: need different passwords, available from library catalogue screen (not Durham CIS password).Economist:NB – on web page indicates 1997-current only. In fact, we have a full text archive back to 1843 via the same platform (works in a similar way rather than actually looking the same) as infotrac. [screenshot on next hidden slide]JISC Media hub: TV news, documentary films, still images and classical music and includes the contents of Film & Sound Online and Newsfilm online. The films are of high quality, and are fully downloadable, either in full or as segments, and can be used freely in learning, teaching and research.News on film:Documents almost 160,000 individual stories from twenty-two cinema newsreels and cinemagazines, 1910-1983. Mention when you first access, won’t be given immediate access to films. May need to click on ‘Movietone’ logo and login/register. Offer to demo for anyone accessing it during hands-on. [screenshot on upcoming hidden slide]
  • Actually freely available...
  • For those of you who have used, want to use or excited to use…[demo offered at end of session]
  • Suggestion: locate an article, follow the citations. Possibly compare to other articles published in the same year.Then, compare the article on Google Scholar, explore some of the citations.
  • Kidon Media link – useful site for identifying, and linking through to, newspapers from particular countries and regions
  • Times Digital Archive 1785-2006Scanned pages = see news in contextSearch by article typeSearch vacuum cleaner in advertisingBritish Newspapers 1600-1900Two collections: C17th & 18th; C19thView pages or articlesVarying coverage - e.g. Newcastle Journal only one issue but Newcastle Courant over 4000 issuesAsks ‘stop running this script’ say noBrowse publication by location England NE Newcastle
  • Demo: Library Catalogue searches (DawsonEra / Netlibrary / MyiLibrary)
  • Expanding your search is about two things:Thinking about all possible terms/spellings/concepts which might be applicable to what you are looking at, to ensure you don’t accidentally rule out any useful result simply due to semantics.If you have focussed a search too much, and aren’t finding the results you expect, about widening your net to see what else you can find.You’ll have some keywords in mind but as few of you will be experts in this area you will need to think about how others have framed research in this field. You will find that the keywords you use will change once you start looking for information and finding relevant resources. You can borrow their search terms and add to your list.synonyms: e.g. survey or questionnaire – make sure you don’British and American spellings: use wildcards e.g. colo?r finds colour and colortruncation: e.g. educati* finds education, educating, educationalist
  • Suggestion: locate an article, follow the citations. Possibly compare to other articles published in the same year.Then, compare the article on Google Scholar, explore some of the citations.
  • Image is an attempt to illustrate the fact you can search many of our books via together as they are held in collections, but some sit individually and so can only be located and found by themselves.“There is, unfortunately, no single, simple way to search across all of the content of all of our e-books”Find e-books at Durham:Durham has more than 300,000 e-books – increasing every day
  • There isn’t one e-book database which searches all the collections we subscribe toCan find a full list of e-book providers that we subscribe to at: http://www.dur.ac.uk/library/resources/online/ebooks/ Not going to have time to go through all the interfaces in this session but will focus more on highlighting what is possible and for you to have a go at using those features in whatever ebook or provider you decide to use.Text in the books is not clickable but there are interactive menus/contents pages with sub headings listed to make the reading more interactiveEach e-book database is slightly different in how it can be searched
  • Demo: Library Catalogue searches (DawsonEra / Netlibrary / MyiLibrary)
  • You can also find e-books outside of Durham’s subscriptions:Can sometimes see previews on sites like AmazonSome items on Google Books have almost the entire book (extended preview) and indeed the full book for those out of copyright-------------------------------------------------------------------------------The books in Google Books come from two sources. The Library Project Worked with several major libraries around the world to include their collections in Book Search: http://books.google.com/googlebooks/partners.html. For books that are still in copyright, the results are like a card catalogue; they show info about the book and, generally, a few snippets of text showing your search term in context.For Library Project books that are out of copyright you can read and download the entire book.The Partner ProgramPartnered with over 20,000 publishers and authors to make their books discoverable on Google. Can flip through a few preview pages of these books, just like you'd browse them at a book shop or library. DEMO:SEARCH FOR Life of Samuel Johnson (in Google Books -point out not in standard google)Can limit search in the advanced search or down the left hand side of the results screen. Full view = full access to the text. Limited Preview = partial access to the text. Snippet = card catalogue. Sometimes no snippet is available. limit to Free Google eBooks Can sort by date or relevance Can choose to view as an image / plain text / PDF / epub (epub used by most readers except Kindle, pdf is a fixed format so can vary in quality if an image) Can search within book search for Edinburgh but there is rarely a contents page. Bib details at the bottom of the ‘About this book screen’ – Can also choose to export to Endnote – and there is also a URL which you can copy and paste. Demo a book with no preview e.g. Polymer-Based Nanostructures and then limit to preview and full view and view Nanomaterials for medical diagnosis and therapy which has a couple of pages missing every now and then (e.g. p.559)Open Access – may be a term you are more familiar with when it comes to publishing in journals but it’s important for books too.OAPEN (Open Access Publishing in European Networks) is a collaborative initiative to develop and implement a sustainable Open Access publication model for academic books in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The basic idea is simple: making peer-reviewed literature permanently available, free of charge and freely redistributable by taking advantage of the low cost and wide access of internet distribution.Demo Oapen (http://www.oapen.org/ ) search for financial crisis and show how to limit by subject area - contemporary politics in hongkong - search text for ‘political correctness’ (CTRL-F)Project Gutenberg provides access to over 38, 000 free ebooksto read on your PC, iPad, Kindle, Sony Reader, iPhone, Android or other portable device. However there are issues to bear in mind with out of copyright material as the law may vary from country to country. However, theirebooks are free in the United States because the copyright has expired there but they may not be free of copyright in other countries. Readers outside of the United States must check the copyright laws of their countries before downloading or redistributing our ebooks. Demo browse function and options for download
  • Suggestion: locate an article, follow the citations. Possibly compare to other articles published in the same year.Then, compare the article on Google Scholar, explore some of the citations.
  • We’ll just look quickly at the submission process for you, and also searching and browsing the thesis collection here at Durham.
  • EThOS covers 122 UK Universities, Index to Theses does not cover all of these (eg Bath Spa, Aberystwyth, Bangor, Brighton) but also includes Irish Universities not covered by EThOS and some additional UK Universities (including those which have been subsumed into existing institutions, such as many of the old London colleges).Use the two together (see examples in following slides) - generallyIndex to Theses has broader coverage, but not always. - EThOS ‘advanced search’ appears to give you options to search more facets, but search function isn’t perfect and it may be that not all Theses on EThOS have abstracts, compared to those available on Index to Theses.In neither service are you searching full text.Want to make a comprehensive search – need to search both.Just making a quick search to find a couple of examples you can access full text immediately, not fussed on items meeting very specific criteria (eg looking more at examples of structure, bibliographies, language style, so want recent examples) – go with EThOS (as can limit to full text availability, even if not as broad a search sometimes).
  • Demo: Library Catalogue searches (DawsonEra / Netlibrary / MyiLibrary)
  • Also mention some may not appear on either service. If you know it exists, try searching the institutions own site.
  • Open Access DEMO’S
  • Para 1: This guidance is for the process after examination, but before you can be awarded your doctorate.Electronic submission: after examination, normally 3-4 weeks after letters of outcome. You still need to follow the guidance and submit 2 copies of a soft-bound copy for examination.Para 2/3: See Graduate School site. All submissions made open access (requirement under Freedom of Information and institution in receipt of public funding). You can apply for an embargo, primarily for on of four reasons: intend to publish soon / patentable or commercially sensitive material / disclosure would release into the public domain data collected either (i) in confidence or (ii) restricted by data protection legislation.Para 3: In order to restrict access, you must discuss with your supervisor and both complete and sign a ‘restricting access’ form. You should also think about issues around any images or graphics you have used in your thesis which might require copyright clearance. You should have done this in any case! Also, informing any research participants, ideally at the point they participate (such as letting them know data they will provide will be in the public domain, and if they will anonymous or identifiable).Para 4: What do you want to do? Embargo so you can publish or patent? Release under licence to access and read but not re-use? Licence to read, access and re-use? What about the data you have collected – will you make that available, and clearly indicate how someone can access this? - Creative Commons allow all of this, usually under various requirements and versions, the basic being re-use with acknowledgement to you as the author.Talk about them submitting and thinking about what they include – getting copyright clearance etc for images and large quotations, informing any research participants etc.http://www.dur.ac.uk/graduate.school/current-students/submissionandbeyond/
  • Think about what copyright you wish to use prior to submission fro examination. Nothing confuses a reader more than you releasing on a creative commons licence, but then including in the actual text a copyright statement you have cut-and-pasted from another thesis you were using to help you put together the correct structure.

Beyond journals and books Beyond journals and books Presentation Transcript

  • Beyond Journals & Books Discovering Doctoral Theses, Navigating News resources and Cruising for Conference papers James Bisset james.bisset@durham.ac.uk Academic Liaison Librarian (Research Support)
  • Part 1a News Resources (Current News)
  • Key resources
  • Demo Nexis UK / Infotrac
  • Part 1b Historic News Resources
  • Key Resources • • • • • • • Times Digital Archive 1785-2006 British Newspapers 1600-1900 Eighteenth century journals 1685-1815 EEBO and ECCO for pamphlets 19th Century British Pamphlets (JSTOR) Economist Historical Archive 1843-2003 Historic Australian newspapers 1803-1954
  • Demo British Newspapers 1600-1900 / Times Digital Archive
  • Additional resources - Times Literary Supplement [1902 - ] - Times Higher Education Supplement - The Economist [1843- ] [1995- ] - JISC Mediahub [ ITN/Reuters archives 1900 - 2007 ] - News on screen [1910- 1983] - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty
  • Historic News on Microform • Some national and local, e.g. - Sunderland & Durham County Herald 1839-67 • International, e.g. - Kabul Times 1969-79, - Milliyet (Istanbul) 1970-86, - Pravda 1921-1953, - Jerusalem Post 1950-2007
  • Hands-on Via Flickr Creative Commons, by © Stuti Sakhalkar. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/theblackcanvas/2945878325/
  • Free news resources • Current news databases – Kidon Media link • Higher Education – ResearchProfessional – Funding Councils’ web sites
  • Part 2 Conference Papers
  • Key Resources • Conference alerts - Current Awareness service for upcoming and recent conferences • Web of Science Conference Proceedings - Will locate individual papers • Proceedings First / Papers First
  • Demo WoS Conference Proceedings / Proceedings & Papers First
  • Part 3 Official Publications
  • Key Collections • Bill Bryson Library – Level 1 (West Wing) - Middle Eastern Documentation Unit (MEDU) - European Documentation Centre (EDC) - British Official Publications Collection • House of Commons Parliamentary Papers (17th/18th/19th/20th century) • official-documents.gov.uk • Google search: “site:.gov.uk” / site:.org.uk”
  • Demo House of Commons Parliamentary Papers
  • Hands-on Via Flickr Creative Commons, by © Stuti Sakhalkar. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/theblackcanvas/2945878325/
  • Part 4 e-books
  • Finding e-books • Durham University Library catalogue –Individual titles –Collections • MyiLibrary • NetLibrary
  • Different providers & formats • Some allow full-text searching; others index only individual chapters • Some display book within the interface; others link to a separate pdf • Some scanned items (with OCR searchable text); others free text
  • Demo DawsonEra / Netlibrary / MyiLibrary (via the Library Catalogue)
  • Finding e-books • Free books on the web – Previews (Google Books) – Open access • OAPEN (Open Access Publishing in European Networks) • Project Gutenberg – Out of copyright
  • Hands-on Via Flickr Creative Commons, by © Stuti Sakhalkar. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/theblackcanvas/2945878325/
  • Part 5 Theses
  • Theses in the UK • Durham e-Theses • Index to Theses - Bibliographic details • EThOS - Full text available for immediate download Full text scanned for free Contact the institutional library to access Full text available, for a fee
  • Demo Durham e-theses / eThos
  • Theses at other institutions - For theses where you asked to pay to download from EThOS - For those not available via EThOS - Use Durham Library’s Document Delivery Service
  • International Theses • Subscription resources - Proquest Digital Dissertations • Open access resources - DART (European Portal) - Trove Australian Theses Programme - Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations - South African Theses and Dissertations - OAIster
  • Thesis Submission at Durham • You will have to submit an electronic copy of your thesis in pdf format. • E-theses are open access: available to anyone, anywhere in the world • Think about third-party copyright and use of research data • Consider what you want to do with your research after you pass e.g. embargo, creative commons licence
  • Image Credits [Slide 2] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by demonsub. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/66397367@N05/6993902269 [Slide 3] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by Quapan. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/9361468@N05/2811407038/ [Slide 11] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by ShironEuro. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/41893519@N07/4040697914/ [Slide 17] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by Kirsty Andrews. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/47745961@N08/5169765739 [Slide 18, 25, 31] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by © Stuti Sakhalkar. Original at http://www.flickr.com/photos/theblackcanvas/2945878325/ [Slide 20] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by Quinn Dombrowski. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/53326337@N00/6381059241 [Slide 23] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by Natesh Ramasamy. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/19204893@N00/7696415730
  • Image Credits [Slide 26] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by Johan Larsson. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/38305415@N00/6966883093/ [Slide 27] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by R Scott Photography . Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/31212777@N05/5233002616/ [Slide 28] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by Wouter de Bruijn. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/26646199@N05/4245891298 [Slide 32] Via Flickr Creative Commons, by Alan Cleaver. Original available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/11121568@N06/4122176776/ [Slide 41] ‘Vitae®, © 2010 Careers Research and Advisory Centre (CRAC) Limited‘ Available at www.vitae.ac.uk/rdf
  • Measuring Researcher Development Vitae Researcher Development Framework [see image credits]