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Digital Books and the New Subscription Economy: Preliminary Results from the BISG Research Study, presented by Ted Hill, President, THA Consulting at Making Information 2014, a track of IDPF's Digital Book 2014 at Book Expo America, May 29, 2014
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Digital Books and the New Subscription Economy: Preliminary Results from the BISG Research Study, presented by Ted Hill, President, THA Consulting at Making Information 2014, a track of IDPF's Digital Book 2014 at Book Expo America, May 29, 2014

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Digital Books and the New Subscription Economy: Preliminary Results from the BISG Research Study, presented by Ted Hill, President, THA Consulting at Making Information 2014, a track of IDPF's Digital …

Digital Books and the New Subscription Economy: Preliminary Results from the BISG Research Study, presented by Ted Hill, President, THA Consulting at Making Information 2014, a track of IDPF's Digital Book 2014 at Book Expo America, May 29, 2014

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  • 1. Digital Books & the New Subscription Economy Ted Hill, THA Consulting May 2014 - NYC 1
  • 2. Introduction
  • 3. Introduction Will we see a subscription economy for digital books?
  • 4. Introduction  Focus on:  Consumer fiction & non-fiction  Scholarly monographs  Professional & technical reference  Higher Ed textbooks
  • 5. Introduction  Extensive research  Broad review of current models for digital media  50+ interviews with industry stakeholders  Survey of BISG and PCG members  Ongoing coverage in the press
  • 6. Introduction Our findings…
  • 7. Introduction They’re here
  • 8. Introduction Or, they’re near
  • 9. Introduction Get used to it!
  • 10. Survey Highlights
  • 11. Survey Highlights 80% see subscriptions as inevitable
  • 12. Survey Highlights 84% see a positive impact in next 5 years
  • 13. Survey Highlights 86% of scholarly presses work with aggregators
  • 14. Survey Highlights 65% of professional publishers sell direct
  • 15. Survey Highlights 33% of textbook publishers see very significant revenue today
  • 16. Survey Highlights (Only 7% of trade publishers do)
  • 17. Dominant Models
  • 18. Dominant Subscription Models Purchase for Perpetual Use
  • 19. Dominant Subscription Models Rentals, Pay-per-Use & Short Term Loan
  • 20. Dominant Subscription Models Paywall Access
  • 21. Dominant Subscription Models Freemium & Open Access
  • 22. Dominant Subscription Models “The market drives the model”
  • 23. Dominant Subscription Models Selection Purchase Use Market drivers:
  • 24. Dominant Subscription Models  Selection  Who chooses?  How important is the breadth and depth of the collection?  Purchase  Is the money spent by the reader or someone else?  Is there competition from lower-priced alternatives?  Use:  Does the reader need whole works, or just parts?  Is it important to “own” the digital works or have long term access?
  • 25. Dominant Subscription Models Access vs Ownership Price Sensitivity Breadth vs Depth Additional factors:
  • 26. Dominant Subscription Models
  • 27. Dominant Subscription Models “The market drives the model”
  • 28. Four Markets
  • 29. Consumer Publishers  Amazon Prime/KOLL, Audible have been with us for a long time  Some publishers already in the game  All publishers know they must reach digital readers who subscribe to other forms of digital media 29
  • 30. Consumer Publishers Impact of “Netflix” model
  • 31. Scholarly Presses  Slower adoption of ebooks  Bigger players already selling direct access to collections  Established and newer aggregators are offering more choices to librarians
  • 32. Scholarly Presses Library budget process
  • 33. Professional Publishers  Early migration of database reference titles  Many have tradition of DTC marketing  How to meet the changing needs of information workers?
  • 34. Professional Publishers Integration into workflow
  • 35. Higher Ed Textbooks  Student preferences for print over digital are at a tipping point  Rentals (digital & print) are a major part of the business today  For many product lines, publishers see Integrated Learning Systems as the future of their business
  • 36. Higher Ed Publishers Migration to learning platforms
  • 37. Open Issues
  • 38. Open Issues Customer & publisher acceptance
  • 39. Open Issues Degradation of high value markets
  • 40. Open Issues Will emerging channels increase revenues?
  • 41. Open Issues Direct-to-consumer vs 3rd party aggregators
  • 42. For more information… On Sale June 2014 Buy your copy today at: BISG.org
  • 43. Thanks! ted@THAconsulting.com