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  • PC – RevisedAB – Phil has revised this incorrectly. The sample should be 1,625. Please correct?JP – change made
  • LW – not sure I like the formatting in the column on the left. It feels weird to have two bullet pointed things and then a third tidbit with no bullet. I understand why it doesn’t have a bullet, but it looks odd. Maybe indent the bullets a few spaces?AB – Where does the information about distance ed students using more e-textbooks come from? Should provide a reference (perhaps just a different slide #) when data is presented which isn’t illustrated by the graph on the slide. SP- see next slide
  • AB – Again, where does this “less frugal” info come from? Need to reference the data – just like providing a footnote in a text piece.SP- Please see the next slide
  • AB – I would delete “…and their impact on student perceptions?” Unless you mean to imply that this study researches student perceptions about the courses profiled…. (I don’t think you do….)
  • JP – I have taken the liberty of combining slides 17, 18 and 19 here. Angela’s notes (on the major/minor and personal interest paragraphs) are copied below.AB – Again, where does this information come from – “Content in major courses was usually considered more valuable.” ? It’s not associated with the graph. The information on Slide 17 is very clearly associated with the graph….the information here seems pulled out of thin air without a footnote.AB – Footnote required.SP-see next slideInsert major value crosstab or add this info in lieu of 18 or 19 (JP – DONE)JP – Text re-worked on this slide and the next, to better reflect the data shown.
  • JP – I used the core physical textbook numbers for two reasons—one being simplicity. (There were nine other rated course elements, including study guides, integrated learning systems, online tutoring, etc.) The second reason is related to the first. The core physical textbook total was 1,176. All the other rated course elements had a much lower number of total respondents—some VERY low. I am therefore mistrustful of the satisfaction percentages, statistically, for any of these. Perhaps in the future we could ask an overall satisfaction question.JP – NEW SLIDE 20
  • AB – Need to figure out a way for the graphs to be easier to read.AB – When you say “The differences shown here….”, what differences are you referring to? I’m can’t tell.Sp- this has now been amended to say the difference in online participation (top graph second set of bars)
  • LW – Not sure I fully understand the statement on this slide. “…there was a dramatic increase in usage of paperback textbooks with declines in hardcover texts and e-textbooks…” you have me that far. But I’m not sure I understand the last bit “…that were actually used in reported classes.” As opposed to what? Textbooks that students buy for fun? Textbooks that they buy but use for anything but studying for the class? Maybe it would be clearer to just stop after “e-textbooks”.AB – What is the “first semester” referenced? Please indicate “fall 2011 semester” or “spring 2010 semester” or whatever…. -OR- just use the normal parlance of “In this survey fielding…” (which we already know was Nov 11 – 29. 2011)Sp- changed
  • LW – does rentals need to be capitalized?PC – Consistency of full-stops/periods – all or none. Final point could either be two separate or brought together with a , or ;AB – Need to fix slide formatting….AB – How does “Purchase of old editions indicates that students are viewing content as a commodity” ? My mind doesn’t make this connection. Please expound. Also, do you mean “used editions”, not “old editions”.SP- Angela- as described above many students are buying used versions of old editions…. Those are the cheapest of all. When students use old editions, they are choosing to use content and exercises that are not current. When I interview publishers, they freely admit that students now consider their content to be interchangeable among editions and sometimes between and among competitive books for the same coursesAB – How can something become “more digital” ? It was “less digital” (but still digital) before?SP Changed
  • LW – I assume “course website” means the university’s website for the course? AB – Good question from “LW”…. Also, what is the difference between slide 24 and slide 25. I see the data is different, but they seem to be answering the same question. I don’t know, however, what the exact question for the graph on slide 24 was.SP – John has added the question… this one asks where do they find out what to buy and the next one says where they will buy it
  • LW – should “etail” be “e-tail”? Elsewhere, digital textbooks are noted as “e-textbooks”, with the hyphen. [AB – I think so.]AB – Need a new word for “market share”. Sp- changed
  • LW – “…acquire a textbooks” – textbook should be singular. Also, hanging parenthesis at the end of the statement. And the sentence is missing final punctuation – period, exclamation point, it needs something.AB – This needs a sub-head. Perhaps, “Acquisition method: format preference” ? SP – Done JP – I’m not sure “format preference” is the best choice here, since we use “format” to signify print textbook vs. e-textbook. I’ve substituted “transaction preference”.
  • AB – Would be better to have the full cross tab question. Sp- Done
  • AB – Where does this information come from: “…along with the percentage of students who are now renting their books.” Need a footnote or slide reference.Sp- Done
  • AB – Need to show cross tab question as well. doneAB – This headline doesn’t follow form. Previous headlines do not provide interpretations of data. Please change – consider calling this “Purchase timing: by source” Sp- done
  • LW – just noticed: why are some slide titles fully capitalized (see previous and subsequent slides) while others, like this one, are not?AB – Per LW’s question, I made sure all slide titles are in sentence case – this seemed to be how you did it most of the time.
  • LW – point three sounds awkward to me. Maybe “Tablets are sparking interest but currently are not widely used in courses”Sp- doneAB – Slide needs proper formatting.AB – Headline doesn’t seem to be in proper English. Are the devices interested? Or… “Increasing interest in, but low penetration of, devices other than laptops”Sp- doneAB – Where is the proof of this statement “Dedicated apps could help mobile students be more productive” ? SP – see slide 45
  • LW – something to keep in mind for the next survey: why is a plain old paper notebook not on here? I know, I know, the world is all about digital right now, but if you’re asking what tools students use to study, those are still valid tools. Plus, based on these results, I’m not sure it’s clear whether the question means “secondary to the textbook” or “secondary to your primary computer”. This is a question about digital devices… This question is asked earlierSp- This is a question about technology devices so that we can trend acquisition and usage patternsPC – (Please select just one.) [AB – Yes, the question should read here just as it did/does in the survey.]
  • LW – “There is enormous interest I the iPad…” should be “in the iPad”.PC – (Please select up to two.) (JP – DONE)AB – Yes to PC’s comment: please put in just as it was written in the survey. I hope, for example, we didn’t say “please specify which you plan to get.” That’s not great English!AB – How can something be “mobile-related” ? It either is mobile or isn’t, yeah? Used to read “Mobile-related device purchase intent”. My edits are in the slide.Sp- Use this one with PC’s added still don’t see PC addedJP – I used a different question (P41 29), because the original question for this slide (11) did not include PCs. I’ve re-worked the headline and text accordingly.
  • (AB – I don’t understand how these two graphs relate to each other. Which graph answers the question? What’s the other question?)JP – I’ve separated the previous version of this slide into two – each with its own graph and question.
  • AB -- Where is the proof for this statement: “However, among those with smartphones only 43% are actually using this capability at present.” on the slide?SP - 17% (yes, frequently) plus 26% (yes, occasionally) = 43%
  • AB – I don’t think it’s “rather than e-books” when students say they’re “interested in learning solutions that would save them time”. It could be an e-book that’s the learning solution that saves time. I see how the reference comes from the graph, but the logic here doesn’t hold. Please rephrase.SP – done
  • SP - Can this be trended? Lets replace the graphs with color coded tables and let’s omit class room technologies like clickers, lecture capture and blackboardJP - I’ll look into trending these, but the questions may be too dissimilar.jP – Trending was not possible. I limited the graph to the top eight (ranked by “item used to a large extent”).Sp- thanks
  • AB – Need to standardize on “e-textbook” vs. “e-book” for this report – particular if “e-textbook” is in the question.Sp- done
  • AB – Need to add the question. It’s not clear where does the “50% more” come from. Had to study this graph awhile to figure it out. Please try to made the written explanation tell the story? $65 for permanent access vs. $41 for semester access is 50% moreAB – I think it’s “..permanent access to their e-textbook…” ? Sp- Changed in text.
  • PC – ‘E-Textbooks’ (plural) in title ? sp- changed
  • LW – why the funny indents on the discussion points? Also, second point has an unnecessary space after “price”.We’ll use this to replace the non xtab slidePC – ‘E-Textbooks’ (plural) in title.AB – How can you prove this?.... “When the e-textbook is well integrated into the course, satisfaction ratings are much higher.Sp- Changed
  • AB – Please do find out and indicate if this is only for students who have used an e-textbook. AB – “fall sample” is another way your referencing this survey fielding. Please standardize on a single reference and use it throughout.AB – Where is it proven that “e-textbook sales have declined among participants…” Need a footnote or slide reference. SP – Slide 25JP – I have re-worked the text.Sp- thanks
  • LW – should be “…ratings of traditional textbooks.”PC – should it be ‘Inclusion OF an integrated learning solution... ‘? —NO (JP)AB – What does “ILS Xtab” mean? Please redraft the headline here. Also, what were the “five other questions”..JP – Headline and question revised to address these concerns.Sp- thanks
  • LW – the wording of this point is awkward. “…many students must have purchased them voluntarily sometimes even without buying the textbook.” Yes. According to the bottom image, that’s what the survey says. There’s something about the tone of the sentence that I don’t like. Maybe I’m reading into it, but it sounds surprised or incredulous to me. It should be more neutral. Yes, access codes are available as a standalone purchase and many students choose to do that. It’s a fact that we were clearly aware of, having offered the response choice. I think this point should be phrased more like this: “Many students had the choice to purchase the access code without the accompanying textbook; a full ___% took this advantage of this option.” SP – John please re-write…JP – Done.
  • AB – Maybe “Students are becoming increasingly more likely to skip class when materials are available online. To take the greatest advantage of digital learning systems, the overall teaching approach may need to be adjusted so students continue to perceive value from their classroom experience.”SP – John, please adjust accordinglyJP – Done
  • LW – not much can be done about it now, but I find this question strange. What does music piracy have to do with textbooks? Is there a connection we’re exploring? And I also don’t agree that downloading content from Sparknotes is illicit. Those are freely available supplemental course materials. Just because a student obtained some Sparknotes doesn’t mean that they didn’t purchase the required course text. Further, would anyone say that purchasing a paper copy of Spark or Cliff’s notes is “illicit”? Was using these supplements illicit 25 years ago, before e-books existed and book prices skyrocketed? Is the illicitness because the material was obtained for free? I don’t see what this has to do with lost sales of primary textbooks, unless it has always caused sales to be lost, in which case it’s not terribly noteworthy. However, downloading public domain texts from sites like Project Gutenberg is not illicit either; again, those are freely available texts. If a student wishes to download Shakespeare’s plays from Gutenberg rather than buying The Complete Arden Shakespeare, there’s really, technically, nothing wrong with that. Certainly, I wouldn’t put it in the same class as downloading pirated books or photocopying entire copyrighted textbooks. “Illicit” is a synonym for “illegal” and there is nothing illegal about some of the behaviors mentioned. It can also mean “morally wrong or undesirable” but what’s morally wrong about obtaining alternate, legal versions of course materials? Or obtaining supplementary materials of one’s own choosing? The behaviors may be undesirable for the publishers’ interests, but not illegal. Using the word “illicit” in this context simply gives this question a ring of bitterness that feels inappropriate for a professional survey. I suggest a better phrase than “illicit behavior” needs to be coined. SP – any suggestions?? This wording was negotiated in earlier editionsJP – Steve and I will discuss these concerns. (Also, I will create a new graph, showing trending over each of the three surveys—NOT just the merged data plus the current survey.) [NOTES: The music data point has been dropped, as it was in all previous reports. The Sparknotes example has always been part of the question.]AB – Will wait for revised slide before commenting.
  • AB – “We will measure these activity levels again in the spring fielding.” When? Now? Suggest pulling this sentence.Sp edited accordingly

BISG's MIP for Higher Ed 2012 -- PAXHIA BISG's MIP for Higher Ed 2012 -- PAXHIA Presentation Transcript

  • Student Attitudes Toward Content in Higher Education Volume Two: Report 1 of 2 Results from survey fielded Nov 11, 2011 – Nov 29, 2011 The effects of technology and pedagogy in creating value for instructors and students© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 1
  • 02 Respondent Demographics Who was surveyed?© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 2
  • Survey Sample Size: 1,625 Survey Timeframe: November 11–29, 2011© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 3
  • Full Time vs. Part Time, & Proximity Graphics are available as Part-time students are on part of the purchased average older than full-time students: study. • Part-time students tend to buy their own course materials. For more information, • Part-time students tend to visit: be very value conscious. Student Attitudes© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 4
  • Distance learners buy more e-books Graphics are available as part of the purchased We can see that when study. students take course online, they are more likely to use e-books. Perhaps this is For more information, explained by synergies visit: with online learning environments. Student Attitudes© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org
  • Who Pays? The source of funds for Graphics are available as textbook purchases has a significant impact on part of the purchased purchasing behavior. study. When parents pay, students are less frugal. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 6
  • Students are more frugal with their own money Graphics are available as part of the purchased When parents pay for study. materials, they are less likely to purchase the lowest cost format or For more information, edition visit: Student Attitudes© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org
  • 03 Course Demographics What was the profile of the typical course selected by survey respondents?© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 8
  • Course characteristics Most students responded Graphics are available as based on courses that were required or in their intended part of the purchased major. study. Similarly, over 60% selected a course in which they were personally interested. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 9
  • Course characteristics Content in required or major Graphics are available as courses was usually considered more valuable, part of the purchased as indicated by the higher study. ―very satisfied‖ responses. Students’ personal interest in the subject matter of the For more information, selected course had a profound impact on the visit: satisfaction ratings of course materials—in this case, the core physical textbook. Student Attitudes© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 10
  • On-campus vs. online The difference in distance Graphics are available as online participation is related to the greater part of the purchased proportion of full-time study. students participating in this survey fielding (November 11–29, 2011). For more information, Part-time students are more likely to take courses online visit: or in a hybrid format. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 11 -
  • Textbook format In this survey fielding, Graphics are available as students indicated using more new and used part of the purchased paperback textbooks than in study. the previous Volume One surveys. They also reported fewer used hardcover and e-textbooks for the selected For more information, course. visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 12 -
  • 04 Buying Behavior What factors influence students’ purchasing decisions?© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 13
  • Price and Value matter• Students are savvy shoppers who explore all options in acquiring their learning materials at the best price• Many students are shopping earlier and looking for better deals online• Price and convenience are the key criteria when making a purchase decision• Purchase of old editions indicates that students are viewing content as a commodity• The popularity of rentals is growing• Textbook bundling is still common, with more bundled elements being offered in digital formats 14
  • Sources of information Many colleges and Graphics are available as universities and instructors develop websites to provide part of the purchased students with course study. information. These course websites continue to be the most popular source for information about course For more information, materials. This enables visit: students to shop online to find the lowest price for their textbooks. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 15 -
  • Acquisition method Almost 30% of students now Graphics are available as report buying textbooks from Amazon. Fewer part of the purchased students are now buying study. their course materials at local bookstores. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 16 -
  • Acquisition method: transaction Graphics are available as preference part of the purchased When students are required study. to acquire a textbook, fewer students were retaining the texts. Increasingly, they say For more information, they prefer to sell back their books at the end of the visit: semester, or simply rent. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 17 -
  • Acquisition method: when buying is Graphics are available as preferred to part of the purchased renting study. As can be seen by this graph, students really like to For more information, get money at the end of the semester from selling their visit: books. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 18 -
  • Acquisition method: when renting is Graphics are available as preferred to part of the purchased buying study. It’s all about lower price and convenience. The For more information, pricing argument has really gained mindshare in the visit: past year. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 19 -
  • Acquisition method: rental sources Graphics are available as Rentals were up for this part of the purchased survey fielding. More study. students reported that they were making their rental transactions at campus bookstores rather than For more information, online rental companies. visit: Perhaps rentals are becoming the choice for the value conscious student that Student Attitudes waits to acquire their textbook after classes have begun. -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 20 -
  • Acquisition method: rental timing Graphics are available as Students wait later to part of the purchased acquire textbooks when they study. are planning to rent. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 21 -
  • Acquisition method: rental satisfaction Graphics are available as Of the nearly 14% of part of the purchased respondents who rented study. their textbooks (slide 27), rental satisfaction increased and dissatisfaction remained very low. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 22 -
  • Acquisition method: non-textbooks Graphics are available as When instructors required part of the purchased readers, novels, or other study. books instead of textbooks, less than 37% of respondents said they buy from the bookstore. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 23 -
  • Acquisition criteria: importance Graphic removed. No matter what format students select, the two most important criteria are For more information on price and convenience. this survey, visit: These two factors often guide online vs. in-person purchasing decisions. Student Attitudes on BISG -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 24 -
  • Acquisition criteria: level of satisfaction Graphic removed. Satisfaction ratings have dropped in every single category. This may be an For more information on explanation for why this survey, visit: students engage in illicit behaviors or make no purchase at all. Student Attitudes on BISG -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 25 -
  • Purchase timing 50% of students said they Graphics are available as purchase their textbooks more than one week before part of the purchased their first class. This helps study. explain the continuing increase in the percentage of students that are buying their course materials For more information, online. visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 26 -
  • Purchase timing: by source Graphics are available as part of the purchased When students buy three or study. more weeks in advance, Amazon.com is the number one purchase source. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 27
  • Retention Only about 25% of students Graphics are available as are interested in retaining their textbooks for future part of the purchased usage. study. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 28 -
  • 05 Device Preferences and Trends What devices are students using now and considering for the near future?© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 2011, 29
  • Increasing interest but low penetration of devices other than laptops • Computers are the most popular study devices • Smartphones are widely deployed but used only modestly for coursework • Tablets are sparking interest but currently are not widely used for coursework • Dedicated apps could help mobile students be more productive© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group 30
  • Primary study device Students currently report a Graphics are available as strong preference for computers as their primary part of the purchased study device, with laptops study. being the most popular. Students need a full range of word processing and data calculation and For more information, manipulation capabilities all visit: in one device. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 31 -
  • Secondary study device A second computer is the Graphics are available as most common device to back up the primary part of the purchased computer. Fewer than 10% study. of students report using smartphones or tablets. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 32 -
  • Device ownership and purchase intent Graphics are available as There is enormous interest part of the purchased in the iPad. Other tablets and e-readers are less often study. perceived as potential study devices. Analysts are forecasting that For more information, the iPad 3 will be a more visit: fully featured, study- capable device. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 33 -
  • Mobile devices: smartphone ownership Graphics are available as part of the purchased 58% of students now have a study. smartphone. Note that Android phones have now surpassed iPhones. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 34 -
  • Mobile devices: smartphone apps in academia Graphics are available as Students are intrigued with part of the purchased smartphone apps. 70% of study. survey respondents indicated an interest in having access to assignments through their smartphone. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 35 -
  • Mobile devices: smartphone apps in academia Graphics are available as However, among those with part of the purchased smartphones, only 43% are study. actually using them to keep track of course information. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 36 -
  • Mobile devices: the iPad as a potential study Graphics are available as device part of the purchased About 46% of students would be study. interested in getting textbooks on their iPad. However, publishers will need to offer learning solutions well beyond For more information, ―pretty e-books‖ to offer visit: students better value. Cengage’s Mindtap is striving to provide this type of product. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 37 -
  • 06 Student Value Perceptions How do students perceive the value they’re receiving from their course materials?© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 2011, 38
  • Pricing Considerations Students are increasingly Graphics are available as aware of the prices of their learning materials, but only part of the purchased a minority (just over 23%) study. feel that their instructors consider prices when making their textbook decisions. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 39 -
  • Required vs. non-required According to student Graphics are available as responses, the percentage part of the purchased of faculty that are requiring textbooks for their core study. required courses is 73%. Foreign Language texts are required most frequently For more information, while courses in humanities visit: and fine arts are least likely to require texts. The percentages in problem Student Attitudes solving disciplines such as math, sciences, and engineering are lower. -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 40 -
  • Cost vs. value More students are viewing Graphics are available as content as a commodity. 70% of students are part of the purchased interested in learning study. solutions that would save them time in their studies. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 41 -
  • Usage vs. satisfaction Integrated learning systems Graphics are available as have now passed core textbooks in usage and part of the purchased satisfaction. Other study. technology-based products are getting strong satisfaction ratings as well. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 42 -
  • Fees Although course materials Graphics are available as fees are currently quite rare, two-thirds of students part of the purchased would be interested in study. exploring this model. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 43 -
  • Physical textbook: satisfaction by Graphics are available as discipline part of the purchased Foreign Language courses study. reported the highest satisfaction with the core physical textbook. For more information, Engineering and visit: Mathematics courses received the lowest ―very satisfied‖ responses. Student Attitudes© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 44
  • E-textbook: usage The percentage of students Graphics are available as with e-textbook experience has increased over time. part of the purchased study. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 45 -
  • E-textbook: pricing Students say they are willing Graphics are available as to pay 50% more to retain permanent access to their e- part of the purchased textbook. study. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 46 -
  • E-textbook: preferences Price was the only Graphic removed. advantage that grew over the last year among e- textbook users. This data demonstrates why For more information on comprehensive learning this survey, visit: solutions are more popular that simple e-textbooks. Student Attitudes on BISG -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 47 -
  • E-textbook: preference Price, portability and Graphics are available as convenience remain top e-textbook benefits. part of the purchased study. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 48 -
  • E-textbook: satisfaction The decline in e-textbook Graphics are available as satisfaction ratings shown here may explain the overall part of the purchased decline in e-textbooks as a study. preferred medium. (See slide 25.) Printing rights, the overall For more information, feature set, and subscription length seem especially visit: important to students. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 49 -
  • 07 The Impact of Digital Learning Systems How do faculty and students benefit?© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 2011, 50
  • ILS and the core textbook Inclusion in an integrated Graphics are available as learning solution produced dramatic increases in the part of the purchased level of satisfaction and study. value ratings for traditional textbooks. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 51 -
  • Access codes The number of textbooks Graphics are available as bundled with access codes jumped significantly with part of the purchased this survey fielding. study. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 52 -
  • Access codes: purchase choice It appears that many Graphics are available as students had a choice as to whether to purchase the part of the purchased access code. However, as study. suggested by the previous slide, an increasing number of respondents noted that access codes came with the For more information, e-textbook. visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 53 -
  • Class attendance Increasingly, students are Graphics are available as more likely to skip class when materials are available part of the purchased online. study. To take better advantage of digital learning systems, the overall teaching approach For more information, may need to be adjusted, so that students perceive a visit: greater value from their classroom experience. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 54 -
  • 08 Illicit Behavior Why do students seek alternatives in content acquisition?© 2011, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 2012, 55
  • Illicit behaviors Illicit behaviors tend to be Graphics are available as learned and last year they grew dramatically from fall part of the purchased to spring. Copying chapters study. and buying international editions were still popular but downloading materials from a website like For more information, Sparknotes became the most visit: common form of illicit behavior. Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 56 -
  • Frequency of illicit behaviors Most students used illicit Graphics are available as behaviors only occasionally. We will continue to track part of the purchased these activity levels in study. future fieldings. For more information, visit: Student Attitudes -© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 57 -
  • 09 Conclusions© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 58
  • Report Overview: Key Findings Students are seeking value and lower prices ° Only 59% are buying current print editions (either new and used) of their assigned textbooks. Many others are using previous editions. ° 11.4% are renting ° Illicit acquisition activity is significant  25% are downloading course materials from unauthorized websites  20% of students admit to photocopying chapters of textbooks© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 59
  • Report Overview: Key Findings When content is well integrated with Digital Learning Platforms it becomes more valuable to students for ° problem solving ° simulations ° test preparation Replica e-textbooks are losing market share Comprehensive learning solutions are gaining new adoptions© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 60
  • Report Overview: Key Findings The vast majority of students rely on a laptop as their primary study device All forms of personal computers are used by more that 90% of students 60% of students have a smartphone Learning and class management apps are under deployed 14.5% of students have a tablet device 4.1% say they use a tablet as their primary or secondary study device© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 www.bisg.org 61
  • For more information Contact the BISG Office at 646-336-7141 or info@bisg.org© 2012, the Book Industry Study Group | Published February xx, 2012 62