ALA2009_John Cox (John Cox Associates)

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ALA2009_John Cox (John Cox Associates)

  1. 1. Developing an E-book Business Model: too new for standardization? John Cox Managing Director John Cox Associates Ltd 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 1
  2. 2. Evolving e-book business model standards  Obstacles to standardization: - Anti-trust law: illegal to discuss business models - No typical e-book: different types of book for different purposes  E-books ten years behind journals 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 2
  3. 3. Important distinctions: different types of e-book  ‘Encyclopedia’ or reference works  ‘Monographs’, or research & scholarship  ‘Textbook’, or learning tools - Course textbook adoptions - Recommended reading 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 3
  4. 4. E-books are not just books  Today’s e-books are facsimiles of print  Tomorrow’s e-books will be more complex and functional: - searchable databases – reference - learning objects – textbooks - narratives – literature, monographs etc  Re-flowable text to display on a variety of devices, with personalization and visualization tools 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 4
  5. 5. Different market segments  Libraries: collections of reference & monographs from large publishers and aggregators  Individuals: chapters or pages to meet the need of the moment or incorporate as objects in course management systems  Different markets require different business models 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 5
  6. 6. Subscription models  For reference & monograph collections  Access limited to set number of books/pages, or unlimited access  Reference databases often have additional functionality  Principal models: concurrent users, FTEs or other “size”-based structures  Collections: self-select or pre-selected 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 6
  7. 7. FTEs: weighting by type of institution – OUP approach  4-yr Academic: 100% of 1st 35,000FTE staff/ faculty/students; then 50%  2-yr Academic/ Specialized/Tribal: 50% of FTE staff/fac./ stud’ts  Middle/High Schools:15% of no students Grades 9-12  Public & State 4% of population up to 100,000; Libraries: sliding scale to 2% of 1 million +  Corporations/Govt./  Military Agencies: 100% employees network access  Non-Profit: 50% employees network access 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 7
  8. 8. E-books included in journal packages or collections Non-Journal Material in Bundles by Publisher Size 100% 90% 80% 70% 9 60% 35 36 No 50% Yes 40% 30% 20% 5 10% 10 7 0% Small Medium Large 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 8
  9. 9. Size categorization: Carnegie and JISC  Carnegie Classification only applies in the USA  JISC Charging Bands based on UK Government funding; only applies in the UK  Not a ‘universal’ business model 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 9
  10. 10. E-book purchase models  Purchase & download at most publishers’ sites and online retailers  Price depends on content or type - Monographs: 10-20% off print price single user, or surcharge for multiple access e.g. Ebrary 150% - Reference is different, e.g. Wiley Print price Online pricing for purchase <10K FTEs 10-40K FTEs 40K + FTEs 100 158 221 309  Textbooks: 50% discount off print 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 10
  11. 11. E-book rental – the short term subscription  Why is a subscription always for a year?  1, 7, 30, 90, 180 day rentals  Pricing from 20% for 7 days to 75% for 180 days  7 day rental most popular for T&F – aimed at students 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 11
  12. 12. Compilation & PPV models  Customized textbooks not new. Compilation of chapters from different titles now standard. For Pearson it is a major revenue source  Compilation facilities now spread beyond adopted textbooks to monographs and recommended reading, e.g. T&F’s eCompile. Priced at 15-20c per page  Pay-per-view not unlike purchasing individual journal articles, e.g T&F’s eCopy/ePrint 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 12
  13. 13. Micropayment facilities  A payment mechanism is required for small amounts- micropayments  T&F ‘MyWallet’ – a prepayment account used for any e-book service  Proven technology, like pay-as-you- go cell phone schemes  A role for PayPal? 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 13
  14. 14. Non-cash elements: access & usage rights  Access: browse, download, print  Authorized users: remote/walk-in?  Display: HTML, PDF, XML, GIF etc  Copy & paste: limited or unlimited?  Download: limited or unlimited?  Printing: by page, chapter or book?  Output devices: PC, PDA, iPod etc  Reader software@ Acrobat Reader etc  MARC records supplied? If so, free or for additional charge? 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 14
  15. 15. Standardization now?  E-book business is too young and too varied  Emerging consensus on supplying MARC records, copy & paste and printing  Standards inhibit experimentation  Nothing to stop librarians creating a list of requirements 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 15
  16. 16. Thank you for the privilege of sharing my thoughts with you John Cox John Cox Associates Ltd. International Publishing Consultancy john.cox@johncoxassociates.co.uk www.johncoxassociates.com 07/13/09 John Cox Associates Ltd 16

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