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Liquid Journals - Intro and RoadMap

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This presentation introduces LiquidJournals, a tool for dissemination of scientific knowledge in web era. It also shows mockups and screenshots of the prototype which we are developing (1st version - …

This presentation introduces LiquidJournals, a tool for dissemination of scientific knowledge in web era. It also shows mockups and screenshots of the prototype which we are developing (1st version - end of June 2010)

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  • To understand these possibilities and opportunities we need to look into the current dissemination model, and the reasons behind its structure.But what’s under the hood.. If we look at the current model we see that most of the features are there because of historical reasons..
  • The Web has changed the way we get, share, produce and consume scientific content. Publishing is almost free. We have now new formats and new types of scientific content: We have blogs, papers, datasets.. provided by a variety of services on the Internet. In traditional and non traditional sources. The problem is now the attention [Huberman]
  • We also have much more researchers now, more publication venues, which leads to the problem of information overloadThe problems are there for:Reviewers – need to review a lot more papersfor the readers – how do they get interesting content. How do I get interesting an relevant content? And what’s interesting, having a lot of information out there we would expect at least to broaden our horizons, but having more information leads to the effect of narrowness, i.e. you tend to focus on sources you know and still you have a lot of information to process.For the authors, how do I make my work visible?As Huberman puts it, the scarce resource now is the attention [Huberman]
  • Original reasons for journal model now gone. Scarce resource now is attentionLiquid journals: back to the roots – how to provide interesting contentSeparate the production/publication of content from the selection and groupingA journal is a view over scientific content avail on the web (free or not)
  • Here is our proposal …Before
  • The first is that scientific knowledge is not communicated (only) via isolated scientific papers, linked to each other via citations. Rather, it is exists in different kinds (data, experiments, ideas,...), it is communicated in different forms (papers, talks, blogs), it evolves almost continuously over time, and it is connected in a knowledge network (papers describe experiments that are built over datasets, all based on ideas inspired from other talks or blogs).
  • The second intuition is that the network which would be so useful to navigate in the sea of scientific knowledge is not objective, but is rather subjective. Whether a paper is inspired from another, or whether a person contributed to a paper may be proven facts or may be opinions, which may also take different forms.Wikipedia approach, but for relationships
  • The third intuition is that we can use the power of the community as editors to help us select knowledge among a sea of information, rather than leaving this role to a selected few.
  • The fourth intuition is that editors and the community of readers can create knowledge. This is a huge potential that is currently untapped for various social and technical reasons, but that can be used to service the scientific community.
  • Also: DiverisityThis talk will present the main ideas behind liquid journals and then present screenshots and mockups describing the current focus of our implementation for a LJ prototype. The LJ tool will help each of us to provide, create, consume, and share scientific knowledge. We will see that the "social" aspect lies both in creating IT services that facilitate the social content creation and editing effort as well as in having the community actually contribute to building the very same IT services that support this.
  • The essence of the journal is manifested via specific relationships with and constraints on other resources it is related to. A liquid journal LJ is characterized by (related to) a set of editors, one or more publishers, a default editorial process, and a set of journal issues. Issues are themselves resources, and can have editors and can be related to processes in case the selection  and publishing process for a specific issue differs from the default one. Both the journal and the issues are linked to resources that represent the content of the issue. In essence, the journal has content that evolves (possibly even continuously), while issues typically represent snapshots of a journal that the editor decides to "solidify". All these properties are expressed via distinguished relationships (such as "contains" or "is edited by") that are known to the LJ software.
  • Temporal relations model the evolution of a contribution, be it a paper or dataset or anything else.  This is a natural behavior of research dissemination where for example we write a preliminary version of a paper and then we extend or refine it. Or, we clean or add more data to a dataset.  Figure evolution can follow a line (as in multiple versions of our project deliverable 3.1) or branch (from one deliverable we then derive a paper or a technical report). In particular, LJ assumes resources to be organized in trees, where each tree essentially denotes a line of research and tracks the evolution in time of related documents. The tree is described by relationships of type <child next version of parent>, and LJ assumes that each child has only one parent. This model for SR reduces overload because it clusters contributions into research lines (which are themselves SRs) and then allow users to navigate through contributions in the line and evolutions, presentations, and other related resources. Although outside the scope of this paper, it allows to more fairly attribute credit to contributions or authors by making explicit the incremental nature of a contribution. Representation relations model the multi-faceted nature of scientific resources. For example, a paper can have associated slides and datasets, and so be deemed as a complex multi-faceted artifact, including artifacts that encode (part of) the same knowledge but have different representation. In particular, LJ assume the relation type <B  alternative_representation_of A> denoting that resource B is a way to render/present the concepts/content of resource A (e.g., B can be a short version of a long paper A). To simplify the model and make visualization manageable, we assume that there can be no resource C who is representation of B. In other words, representations are arranged in a star where there is a resource at the center, and many alternative possible representations can be connected to it.Structural relations represent arbitrary relationships between contributions, where the relationship is described by annotations. For example, a paper can be related to a dataset in that it describes results of experiments on that dataset. LJs exploit these structural relationships: <Re performed_on dataset Rd> denotes that Re is an experiment, Rd is a dataset, and Re is conducted on top of dataset Rd.   <R1 reporting_on R2> denotes that R1 describes a dataset R2 or reports on the result of an experiment R2.   Authorship relations denote who contributed to the creation of the resource. <P contributed_to R> indicates that person P contributed to the creation of the scientific resource R the typical example being the authoring of a paper. A typical annotation for this relation would denote the kind of contribution. For example, it may state that P contributed the state of the art section, or that P simply contributed by hiring the people who did the actual work. <P edited R> indicates that person P has been the editor of a journal issue R. 
  • Automated selection (keyword-, relation- based, …)Communities – in the future
  • Transcript

    • 1. Liquid Journals – an approach for knowledge dissemination in the Web era
      Marcos Baez, Aliaksandr Birukou,Fabio Casati, Maurizio Marchese and the LiquidPub team
      University of Trento, Italy
    • 2. LiquidPub project
      Small or medium-focused research project funded by the European Commission under FP7 FET OPEN (Future and Emerging Technologies) scheme
      Runs from May 2008 till April 2011
      Budget of 2.1M €
      Partners
      University of Trento, Italy
      Spanish National Research Council, Spain
      Springer, Germany
      Centre National de la RechercheScientifique, France
      University of Fribourg, Switzerland
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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    • 3. Goal of the LiquidPub project
      Capture the lessons learned and opportunities provided by:
      the Web and open source,
      agile development
      to develop
      concepts, models, metrics, and tools
      for an efficient (for people),
      effective (for science),
      and sustainable (for publishers and the community)
      way of creating, disseminating, evaluating, and consuming scientific knowledge
      Understand what’s good for science, and make it happen
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    • 4. What do we do in LiquidPub?
      • See http://project.liquidpub.org/research-areas
      • 5. Scientific Knowledge Objects
      • 6. Research evaluation and peer review analysis
      • 7. Managing lifecycle of web artifacts
      • 8. Discovering scientific communities
      • 9. Licensing and copyright
      • 10. Three case studies:
      • 11. Liquid Journals
      • 12. Liquid Books (collaborative creation of [not only] teaching material)
      • 13. Liquid Conferences (platform for interdisciplinary conferences where invited papers are presented for community discourse)
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    • 14. eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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      Motivating Scenario
      • What’s the goal of journals today?
      • 15. Select and group related content, after a submission of a paper
      • 16. Useful to find content, useful (?) to evaluate
      • 17. What’s under the hood?
      • 18. Print/ship cost money: need to be sure it’s good before it is published. Only way peer review
      • 19. “issues”/volumes needed for printing and organizational reasons
      • 20. Probably the best possible model in the pre-web era
      Scarce resource was printing and distribution
    • 21. eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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      The Web Era
      • The Web has changed the way we get, share, produce and consume scientific content
      Internet
    • 22. eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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      The Web Era
      15 review to do by tomorrow…
      • Also social changes..
      Reviewers
      The scarce resource now is the attention [Huberman]
      How do I get interesting content!
      How do I make my work visible!
      So much info out there - I’d rather go for known sources!
      Authors
      Readers
    • 23. eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
      Aliaksandr Birukou – Liquid Journals: An approach for knowledge dissemination in the Web era
      Journals: Revisited
      • Original reasons for the current model are gone
      (does not necessarily mean current model is still not the best)
      • Back to the roots: How to provide interesting content?
      datasets
      papers
      blogs
      8
    • 24. eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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      Liquid journals: Proposal
      … to broader community
      ...with colleagues, friends, other people working on the same topic…
      ..already available on the Web, in pre-prints, journals, proceedings, blogs…
    • 25. Let’s see where we are
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      Image from http://obychnogo.net/files/images/catch-the-moment-45-2.preview.jpg
    • 26. Key intuition 1 – evolving network of multifacet objects
      Data
    • 27. Key intuition 2 – It’s subjective!
    • 28. Key intuition 3 – editing power of the community
    • 29. Key intuition 4 – readers create knowledge
    • 30. Key intuition 5 - Diversity
    • 31. Definition: a liquid journal
      Collection of (interesting and relevant) links to scientific resources (contributions, projects, events, people, …)
      LJ do not host content, just link it
      Possibly defined as a query over the Web
      Selected by editors (Possibly based on defined procedures)
      Offered by a publisher
      May change continuously and may have issues (snapshots)
      Users may define relations between resources
    • 32. Relationship types (examples)
      Temporal (e.g., next_version)
      Representation (e.g., alternative_repr_of)
      Structural (e.g., performed_on, reporting_on)
      Authorship (contributed, edited,…)
    • 33. Step 1
      Filling journal with content
    • 34. Automatic query over Web
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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    • 35. From iPhone
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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    • 36. From e-mail
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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    • 37. From Google Scholar
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    • 38. From CiteULike
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    • 39. From ICaST (published by ICST)
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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    • 40. Other options we envisioned
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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      • Demos from Share http://is.tm.tue.nl/staff/pvgorp/share/
      • 41. Workflows and files from http://www.MyExperiment.org
      • 42. Videos: http://VideoLectures.net/, http://redress.lancs.ac.uk/
      • 43. Links from Facebook, DBLP, ACM Digital Library, Springerlink
      • 44. All those are subject to availability of API and Terms of Use
      • 45. From citation snippets
    • Step 2
      Organizing content
    • 46. Cooking area, sharing and annotating
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      Your
      Tags
      And
      Opinions
      You can drop contributions on the dock for putting stuff in the
      Cooking area or sharing them with your contacts
      You define the quick links by dropping journals and users here
      Non intrusive and without distracting effects
    • 47. Adding relations
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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    • 48. Navigation
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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      Research lines and reuse
      Multiple facets of contribution
    • 49. Step 3
      Publishing journal
    • 50. Making a new issue
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    • 51. After publishing
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      Traditional
      vs.
      Novel metrics
      (5 new)
    • 52. Step 4
      Consuming journals
    • 53. Information about journals I follow, where I appear, etc.
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      My subscriptions
      Filters
      »
      Authors
      Peer review (5 new)
      Fabio
      Juan
      Alejandro
      Scientific metrics (7 new)
      Communities
      LJs publishing me
      Computer Science
      Physics
      Biology
      Scientific metrics
      Tags
      UNITN-DB-Group
      Peer-review
      Scientific publ
      Sources
      LJs I edit
      Springer
      Arxiv
      Lifecycle Management
      Time
      Data integration
    • 54. Consuming relations
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    • 55. Sharing with research group
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    • 56. Project/research group/personal page
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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    • 57. Thematic wikis
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      This info can come from Liquid Journals
      From https://copilosk.fbk.eu/
    • 58. Social networks
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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      LJ I edit
      LJ I follow
    • 59. Not just reading…
      Navigating
      Sharing
      Linking and annotating (selfishly)
      Better search and management of info overload
      Knowledge extraction from readers/editors
      Efficient dissemination
      Publish what I want, when I want, how I want, then deliver it through the information pipes
      Make evolution of ideas explicit
      Reuse implicit review that people do anyways when selecting content for their own purposes
    • 60. …there are some shortcomings
      Do I get tenure
      if my paper appear in a LiquidJournal?
      If I am a good editor of an LJ (good content selector)
      Would people use LJ?
      We don’t know yet, but try to develop it so that WE can use it
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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    • 61. …but there are also benefits
      • Readers get interesting and relevant scientific content
      • 62. Multi-faceted: blogs, papers, datasets, etc..
      • 63. Peer-reviewed vs. non peer-reviewed
      • 64. Diverse content
      • 65. Authors get real-time dissemination and evaluation
      • 66. Consider other aspects of research productivity: good selector, good ideas, good reviewer, incentives for early sharing
      • 67. Benefits for editors:
      • 68. Publish first, then gain acceptance (even if you a student)
      • 69. Try with new community (e.g. new interdisciplinary area) and see if it really worth a journal
      42
    • 70. Do you want to see it running?
      Image from http://club.foto.ru/gallery/images/preview/2006/08/30/683761.jpg
    • 71. Choose
      eSI Workshop, Edinburgh, 12 May 2010
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    • 72. More
      The LiquidPub project. http://project.liquidpub.org
      • Google liquidpub-announce and subscribe if you are interested (VERY low traffic): http://disi.unitn.it/mailman/listinfo/liquidpub-announce
      • 73. Or, subscribe to our blog: http://liquidpub.wordpress.com
      • 74. Or, follow us on twitter: http://twitter.com/liquidpub
      • 75. Participate in our surveys:
      • 76. Scientific publishing and Web 2.0 - http://tinyurl.com/LPSurvey2010
      • 77. Rank scientists (and fight metrics) at http://tinyurl.com/icwesurvey
    • Ranking Researchers via Peer-Voting
      Rank researchers via voting
      1st Step: conduct surveys to gather votes reflecting the perceived impact of researchers
      2nd Step: correlate votes with bibliometric indicators of impact using voting-based ranking algorithms
      How to participate: http://tinyurl.com/icwesurvey
      2 to 20 minutes (you choose!!!)
    • 78. Thanks for your attention