Management
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Management

on

  • 4,211 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
4,211
Views on SlideShare
4,208
Embed Views
3

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
198
Comments
0

1 Embed 3

https://tasks.crowdflower.com 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Management Management Presentation Transcript

  • PowerPoint Presentation to Accompany Chapter 3 of Management, 8/e John R. Schermerhorn, Jr . Prepared by: Michael K. McCuddy Valparaiso University Published by: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  • Planning Ahead — Chapter 3 Study Questions
    • What is ethical behavior?
    • How do ethical dilemmas complicate the workplace?
    • How can high ethical standards be maintained?
    • What is corporate social responsibility?
    • How do organizations and governments work together in society?
    • Ethics
      • Code of moral principles.
      • Set standards of “good” and “bad” as opposed to “right” and “wrong.”
    • Ethical behavior
      • What is accepted as good and right in the context of the governing moral code.
    Study Question 1: What is ethical behavior?
    • Law, values, and ethical behavior:
      • Legal behavior is not necessarily ethical behavior.
      • Personal values help determine individual ethical behavior.
        • Terminal values
        • Instrumental values
    Study Question 1: What is ethical behavior?
  • Study Question 1: What is ethical behavior?
    • Utilitarian view of ethics — greatest good to the greatest number of people.
    • Individualism view of ethics — primary commitment is to one’s long-term self-interests.
    • Moral-rights view of ethics — respects and protects the fundamental rights of all people.
    • Justice view of ethics — fair and impartial treatment of people according to legal rules and standards.
  • Figure 3.1 Four views of ethical behavior.
    • Cultural issues in ethical behavior:
      • Cultural relativism
        • Ethical behavior is always determined by cultural context.
      • Cultural universalism
        • Behavior that is unacceptable in one’s home environment should not be acceptable anywhere else.
    Study Question 1: What is ethical behavior?
  • Figure 3.2 The extremes of cultural relativism and ethical imperialism in international business ethics. Source : Developed from Thomas Donaldson, “Values in Tension: Ethics Away from Home,” Harvard Business Review , vol. 74 (September-October 1996), pp. 48-62.
  • Study Question 1: What is ethical behavior?
    • How international businesses can respect core or universal values:
    • Respect for human dignity
    • Create culture that values employees, customers, and suppliers.
    • Keep a safe workplace.
    • Produce safe products and services.
    • Respect for basic rights
    • Protect rights of employees, customers, and communities.
    • Avoid anything that threatening safety, health, education, and living standards.
    • Be good citizens
    • Support social institutions, including economic and educational systems.
    • Work with local government and institutions to protect environment.
    • An ethical dilemma occurs when choices, although having potential for personal and/or organizational benefit, may be considered unethical.
    • Ethical dilemmas include:
      • Discrimination
      • Sexual harassment
      • Conflicts of interest
      • Customer confidence
      • Organizational resources
    Study Question 2: How do ethical dilemmas complicate the workplace?
  • Study Question 2: How do ethical dilemmas complicate the workplace?
    • Ethical behavior can be rationalized by convincing yourself that:
      • Behavior is not really illegal.
      • Behavior is really in everyone’s best interests.
      • Nobody will ever find out.
      • The organization will “protect” you.
    • Factors influencing ethical behavior include:
      • The person
        • Family influences, religious values, personal standards, and personal needs.
      • The organization
        • Supervisory behavior, peer group norms and behavior, and policy statements and written rules.
      • The environment
        • Government laws and regulations, societal norms and values, and competitive climate in an industry.
    Study Question 2: How do ethical dilemmas complicate the workplace?
  • Figure 3.3 Factors influencing ethical managerial behavior—the person, organization, and environment.
    • Ethics training:
      • Structured programs that help participants to understand ethical aspects of decision making.
      • Helps people incorporate high ethical standards into daily life.
      • Helps people deal with ethical issues under pressure.
    Study Question 3: How can high ethical standards be maintained?
    • Whistleblowers
      • Expose misdeeds of others to:
        • Preserve ethical standards
        • Protect against wasteful, harmful, or illegal acts
    • Laws protecting whistleblowers vary
    Study Question 3: How can high ethical standards be maintained?
  • Study Question 3: How can high ethical standards be maintained?
    • Barriers to whistleblowing include:
      • Strict chain of command
      • Strong work group identities
      • Ambiguous priorities
    • Organizational methods for overcoming whistleblowing barriers:
      • Ethics staff units who serve as ethics advocates
      • Moral quality circles
  • Study Question 3: How can high ethical standards be maintained?
    • Ethical role models:
      • Top managers serve as ethical role models.
      • All managers can influence the ethical behavior of people who work for and with them.
      • Excessive pressure can foster unethical behavior.
      • Managers should be realistic in setting performance goals for others.
    • Codes of ethics:
      • Formal statement of an organization’s values and ethical principles regarding how to behave in situations susceptible to the creation of ethical dilemmas.
    • Areas often covered by codes of ethics:
      • Bribes and kickbacks
      • Political contributions
      • Honesty of books or records
      • Customer/supplier relationships
      • Confidentiality of corporate information
    Study Question 3: How can high ethical standards be maintained?
  • Study Question 4: What is corporate social responsibility?
    • Corporate social responsibility:
      • Looks at ethical issues on the organization level.
      • Obligates organizations to act in ways that serve both its own interests and the interests of society at large.
  • Study Question 4: What is corporate social responsibility?
    • Organizational stakeholders
      • Those persons, groups, and other organizations directly affected by the behavior of the organization and holding a stake in its performance.
    • Typical organizational stakeholders
      • Employees
      • Customers
      • Suppliers
      • Owners
      • Competitors
      • Regulators
      • Interest groups
  • Figure 3.4 Multiple stakeholders in the environment of an organization.
  • Study Question 4: What is corporate social responsibility?
    • Beliefs that guide socially responsible business practices:
      • People do their best with a balance of work and family life.
      • Organizations perform best in healthy communities.
      • Organizations gain by respecting the natural environment.
      • Organizations must be managed and led for long-term success.
      • Organizations must protect their reputations.
  • Study Question 4: What is corporate social responsibility?
    • Perspectives on social responsibility:
      • Classical view —
        • Management’s only responsibility is to maximize profits.
      • Socioeconomic view —
        • Management must be concerned for the broader social welfare, not just profits.
  • Study Question 4: What is corporate social responsibility?
    • Arguments against social responsibility:
      • Reduced business profits
      • Higher business costs
      • Dilution of business purpose
      • Too much social power for business
      • Lack of public accountability
    • Arguments in favor of social responsibility:
      • Adds long-run profits
      • Improved public image
      • Avoids more government regulation
      • Businesses have resources and ethical obligation
  • Study Question 4: What is corporate social responsibility?
    • Criteria for evaluating corporate social performance:
      • Is the organization’s …
        • Economic responsibility met?
        • Legal responsibility met?
        • Ethical responsibility met?
        • Discretionary responsibility met?
  • Figure 3.5 Criteria for evaluating corporate social performance.
  • Study Question 4: What is corporate social responsibility?
    • Strategies for pursuing social responsibility:
      • Obstructionist — meets economic responsibilities.
      • Defensive — meets economic and legal responsibilities.
      • Accommodative — meets economic, legal, and ethical responsibilities.
      • Proactive — meets economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary responsibilities.
  • Figure 3.6 Four strategies of corporate social responsibility—from obstructionist to proactive behavior.
  • Study Question 5: How do organizations and governments work together in society?
    • How government influences organizations:
      • Common areas of government regulation of business affairs:
        • Occupational safety and health
        • Fair labor practices
        • Consumer protection
        • Environmental protection
  • Study Question 5: How do organizations and governments work together in society?
    • How organizations influence governments:
      • Personal contacts and networks
      • Public relations campaigns
      • Lobbying
      • Political action committees
      • Sometimes by illegal acts, such as bribery or illegal financial contributions to political campaigns
  • Figure 3.7 Centrality of ethics and social responsibility in leadership and the managerial role.
  • Study Question 5: How do organizations and governments work together in society?
    • Corporate governance:
      • The oversight of the top management of an organization by a board of directors.
    • Corporate governance involves:
      • Hiring, firing, and compensating the CEO.
      • Assessing strategy.
      • Verifying financial records.
  • COPYRIGHT Copyright 2004 © John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction or translation of this work beyond that named in Section 117 of the United States Copyright Act without the express written permission of the copyright owner is unlawful. Requests for further information should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. The purchaser may make back-up copies for his/her own use only and not for distribution or resale. The Publisher assumes no responsibility for errors, omissions, or damages, caused by the use of these programs or from the use of the information contained herein.