UXsofia "Communicating in Style" 60 minutes

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In this presentation, Birgit introduces the topic of communication styles, while putting it into context of our profession. She will show how you can identify our own style and that of others and how that helps to be heard by various stakeholders during the process. She will explain the different communication and behavioral needs, and why you need to be able to flex our own style to that of others: this helps you to avoid conflicts, it increases your impact on projects, and it will also contribute to a prosperous work environment.

60 minutes session

Published in: Design, Technology

UXsofia "Communicating in Style" 60 minutes

  1. 1. Communicating in Style Birgit Geiberger UX SOFIA 7 June 2013, Sofia
  2. 2. Birgit Geiberger Creative Director UX · Interaction Designer · Consultant @birgitgcom
  3. 3. Communicating in Style Overview • Intro communication models • The Social Style Model • Identifying someone’s Style • Communicating with Styles • Social Styles at work • Resolving conflicts
  4. 4. “One cannot not communicate” Paul Watzlawick
  5. 5. Every behavior is a form of communication
  6. 6. Words aren’t the key Effectiveness of communication is based on 7% of the meaning of the words we use 38% of the way we say the words 55% of nonverbal clues Research (1970) by Albert Mehrabian, Prof. emeritus UCLA, Author of “Silent Messages: Implicit Communication of Emotions and Attitudes
  7. 7. 93% is conveyed through observable behavior Effectiveness of communication is based on 7% of the meaning of the words we use 38% of the way we say the words 55% of nonverbal clues Research (1970) by Albert Mehrabian, Prof. emeritus UCLA, Author of “Silent Messages: Implicit Communication of Emotions and Attitudes
  8. 8. History of personality types & theories • Four temperaments (460–370 BC) Galen & Hippocrates, Greek Physicians • Type theory (1921) Carl Jung, Swiss Psychotherapist & Psychiatrist • DISC-theory (1928) William Marston, American Psychologist Comic book writer, who created the character “Wonder Woman” • Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (1962) Katherine Myers & her daughter Isabel Briggs, American Author • People Styles Model (1964) Dr. David Merrill & Roger Reid Industrial Psychologist
  9. 9. Models compared approx. Hippocrates Jung DISC Merrill/Reid Choleric Director Dominance Sanguine Intuitor Influencing Phlegmatic Feeler Steadiness Melancholic Thinker Compliance Myers/ Briggs Extrovert / Thinker Extrovert / Feeler Introvert / Feeler Introvert / Thinker Driver Expressive Amiable Analytical
  10. 10. Adjustment of names Social Styles Social Styles Director Socializer Relator Thinker Merrill/Reid – Driver Expressive Amiable Analytical
  11. 11. The Social Styles Model The Social Styles Model is Trademark of the Tracom Group
  12. 12. What are Social Styles not? • A method to interpret the "inside" of a person • No thoughts, character or personality assessment
  13. 13. inside versus outside tThoughts Feelings Behavior
  14. 14. What are Social Styles? • Observable behavioral patterns • Based on the "outside" of a person (verbal, vocal, and visual clues)
  15. 15. Indirect Direct
  16. 16. Guarded Open Indirect Direct
  17. 17. Relator “Amiable Style” People person Socializer “Expressive Style” Front person Thinker “Analytical Style” Thought person Director “Driver Style” Action person Guarded Open Indirect Direct
  18. 18. Guarded Open Indirect Direct People oriented
  19. 19. Guarded Open Indirect Direct Task oriented
  20. 20. Guarded Open Indirect Direct Slow pace
  21. 21. Guarded Open Indirect Direct Fast pace
  22. 22. X X Potential conflicts
  23. 23. Potential conflicts X X
  24. 24. Applying Social Styles will help you to • Improve communication • Reduce conflict • Increase pleasure of working • Enhance individual & team performance • Increase productivity • Get better business results
  25. 25. The Social Styles in detail
  26. 26. 25 % 25 % 25 % 25 % Confirmed through research done by Wilson Learning
  27. 27. We all display some aspects of each Social Style
  28. 28. But we have one dominant style
  29. 29. Dominant style, our “comfort zone” • Relate & work in ways that is ones favorite • Emerged early in life • This style became habitual • Easiest to function with those patterns of behavior
  30. 30. Relator: “I feel ...” Relationship oriented
  31. 31. Relator The support specialist “It’s not win or lose, it’s how many friends you have”
  32. 32. Relator The support specialist • Strong & loyal team players • Good listeners & sensitive to others feelings • Very supportive, approachable & cooperative • Open with emotions, warm & friendly • High priority on friendships & close relationships • Easy to get along with
  33. 33. Relator Potential issues • Reluctant to change • Stick to the comfortable & known • Avoid risks • Do things in a very slow-paced way • Undisciplined in their use of time, due to sharing personal objectives & feelings with others
  34. 34. Socializer: “I want ...” Expression oriented
  35. 35. Socializer The social specialist “Let’s all do it – now!”
  36. 36. Socializer The social specialist • Highly flexible & adaptable to new situations • Act quickly & are willing to take risks • Very enthusiastic, energetic & spontaneous • Very imaginative, lots of creative ideas • Communicative & fun to be around • Say & show what they think • Involve others with their feelings & thoughts
  37. 37. Socializer Potential issues • Little concern for practical details • Easily change course of action • Move rapidly from subject to subject while forgetting to address specifics • Struggle with commitment & follow-through • Undisciplined in their use of time (too many distractions) • Base decisions on opinions rather than facts & data
  38. 38. Director: “I will ...” Action oriented
  39. 39. Director The control specialist “I want it done. Yesterday!”
  40. 40. Director The control specialist • Know exactly what they want, where they are going & how to get there quickly • Very focussed: swift, efficient, to the point in everything they do. Out accomplishes anybody • Make their own decisions, don't like at all to be told what to do or what not to do - high need of control • Prefer to be presented with options • Take risks
  41. 41. Director Potential issues • Come across forceful & dominant • Highly result driven – it’s not about pleasing people on the way • Say what they think • Very impatient • Work best without others or with people who are able to move quickly • Control & do not show emotions
  42. 42. Thinker: “I think ...” Process oriented
  43. 43. Thinker The method specialist “I’d rather be right than quick”
  44. 44. Thinker The method specialist • Base decisions purely on facts (tangible, practical, realistic evidence) • Ask questions, gathers information • Steadfast, reliable & dependable • Strong sense of duty & obligation • Seem to move slowly, but they use their time in a deliberate, disciplined manner • Natural givers & cooperative team members
  45. 45. Thinker Potential issues • Study data seriously before forming an opinion or being enthusiastic • Can come across skeptical & critical • Main priority is job at hand & the process to achieve it • Avoid risks & are very cautious • High control of emotions • People and friendships are important, but it does not show on initial contact – first the facts
  46. 46. Being timid Being erratic Being too critical Being dominant & demanding Weakness
  47. 47. People to get along To be appreciated To be right To be in control Need
  48. 48. Fear Change Not being liked Being irrational / wrong Lack of control / Weakness
  49. 49. Harmony & stability Inspiration The perfect solution Productivity Seek
  50. 50. To cooperate To get directions New & different things Positive energy & optimism To plan Pattern & predictability To take charge Results Like
  51. 51. Identifying someone’s Style
  52. 52. To identify someone’s Style, pay attention to... Their way of talking • Loudness & tone of voice • Topics of conversation (personal versus factual) • “we” or “I” • Pace Their body language • Many gestures • Facial expressions • Eye contact Their listening skills
  53. 53. To identify someone’s Style, determine the ... • degree of Assertiveness • degree of Responsiveness in their behavior
  54. 54. Assertiveness Amount of talking Rate of speaking Voice volume Body movement Expressed energy Posture Forcefulness of gestures
  55. 55. Assertiveness Less Slower Softer Less, Slower Less Leans back Less More Faster Louder More, Faster More Leans forward More Amount of talking Rate of speaking Voice volume Body movement Expressed energy Posture Forcefulness of gestures
  56. 56. Responsiveness Express feelings Appear friendly Facial expression Gestures & touch Vocal inflection Small talk Use of stories & anecdotes
  57. 57. Responsiveness Express feelings Appear friendly Facial expression Gestures & touch Vocal inflection Small talk Use of stories & anecdotes Less Less Less Less Less Less Less (rather factual) More More More More More More More (very lively)
  58. 58. Talking Direct assertion Louder Commanding Uses voice to emphasize Indirect assertion Quieter Enquires Even tone-of- voice Moderate Very fast Slower Faster
  59. 59. Body Language Leans backward Leans forward
  60. 60. Body Language Facial expression Lots of gestures Mostly good eye-contact Some facial expression Regular gestures Good eye-contact Limited / no facial expression Deliberate gestures Intense eye-contact Limited / no facial expression Limited gestures Limited eye-contact
  61. 61. ListeningGood Poor
  62. 62. Listens Reacts Interrupts (often w/ ideas) Talks a lot Listens very good Reacts Relates Cares Wants to control conversation May interrupt Likes summaries Listens very precise May appears as they are not Listening
  63. 63. Communicating with Social Styles
  64. 64. Animated, excitable Can come on too strong Informal, casual Direct, to the point Outspoken Formal, business-like Dreamy thoughts May seem vague Informal, casual Specific, concise Clear, logical Formal, bottom-line Style of Communication
  65. 65. Animated, excitable Can come on too strong Informal, casual Direct, to the point Outspoken Formal, business-like Dreamy thoughts May seem vague Informal, casual Specific, concise Clear, logical Formal, bottom-line Style of Communication
  66. 66. Relator Will always ask ... Why & Who?
  67. 67. How to communicate with a Relator • Be supportive • Develop a relationship, spend time talking • Be friendly & understanding • Inform early on when changes may occur • Don’t break promises • Make them feel safe
  68. 68. Animated, excitable Can come on too strong Informal, casual Direct, to the point Outspoken Formal, business-like Dreamy thoughts May seem vague Informal, casual Specific, concise Clear, logical Formal, bottom-line Style of Communication
  69. 69. Socializer Will always ask ... Who else?
  70. 70. How to communicate with a Socializer • Show appreciation for what they have done • Be supportive of their ideas • Never ignore them • Be positive & show energy • Help them to stay on track
  71. 71. Animated, excitable Can come on too strong Informal, casual Direct, to the point Outspoken Formal, business-like Dreamy thoughts May seem vague Informal, casual Specific, concise Clear, logical Formal, bottom-line Style of Communication
  72. 72. Director Will always ask ... What & When?
  73. 73. How to communicate with a Director • Provide executive summary upfront • Be clear & precise • Get to the point fast, don’t irritate by being inefficient or indecisive • Provide options & show benefits • Don’t talk about personal topics
  74. 74. Style of Communication Animated, excitable Can come on too strong Informal, casual Direct, to the point Outspoken Formal, business-like Dreamy thoughts May seem vague Informal, casual Specific, concise Clear, logical Formal, bottom-line
  75. 75. Thinker Will always ask ... Why & how?
  76. 76. How to communicate with a Thinker • Provide a lot of information – they will seek for patterns & factual relationships • Provide thoughtful arguments & facts • Give time to process • Provide plans with deadlines to set expectations • Inform early about potential changes • Don't misinterpret lack of shown enthusiasm with disinterest
  77. 77. Social Styles at work
  78. 78. Work style & pace Relator • Easy going, cooperative • Always willing to help & support • Goes with the flow • No strong sense of urgency & rarely in a hurry • Needs time to change • Dislikes pressure
  79. 79. Work style & pace Socializer • Unstructured, likes freedom • Lots of people interaction • Makes lists of people to call & places to go • Fast • Bored easily • Moves from one thing to another
  80. 80. Work style & pace Director • Works in priority order • Does several things at once • Intense, driven • Generates ideas • Very fast • Likes change
  81. 81. Work style & pace Thinker • Thorough, attentive to detail • Step by step procedures • Concentrates on one thing at a time • Methodical • Steady stream of work • Likes predictable routines
  82. 82. Work Space Interesting things, gadgets, novelty items everywhere Personal & fun photos Desk area seems chaotic Sentimental souvenirs Photos of family & friends Desk area may appear cluttered Functional Organized Rarely personal items References at their fingertips Lots of paper Work organized in piles
  83. 83. Resolving conflicts among Social Styles
  84. 84. Conflicts & back-up behavior • Every style has a characteristic back-up behavior • Back-up behavior can be extreme, inappropriate & inflexible • People fall into this behavior when under pressure or in a conflict situation • Recognizing & addressing this behavior in an appropriate manner can resolve conflicts
  85. 85. Back-up behavior Flight Fight
  86. 86. Back-up behavior With others Solo
  87. 87. Back-up behavior Consenting Submissive Attacking Sarcastic Avoiding Withdraw Autocratic Dictatorial
  88. 88. Flight Intervene
  89. 89. Flight Listen to their concerns
  90. 90. FightNeutralize
  91. 91. FightLet them vent
  92. 92. Steps to resolve conflicts 1.Identify styles of participants 2.Plan for upcoming conversation • Determine styles & consciously prepare to flex • Adapt deliverables & presentation accordingly 3.Apply your knowledge & adapt if necessary 4.Evaluate afterwards to learn from the experience
  93. 93. Please remember...
  94. 94. No style is better than another
  95. 95. Beware of generalization and swift judgement
  96. 96. Always assume good intentions even if you don’t understand people’s behavior. They may simply have a different style.
  97. 97. Thank you! Birgit Geiberger · design@birgitg.com

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