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T M 11  G M O (4)
T M 11  G M O (4)
T M 11  G M O (4)
T M 11  G M O (4)
T M 11  G M O (4)
T M 11  G M O (4)
T M 11  G M O (4)
T M 11  G M O (4)
T M 11  G M O (4)
T M 11  G M O (4)
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T M 11 G M O (4)

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  • Keywords: Africa; food security; globalisation; GM; green revolution; India; justice; partnership; population; poverty Summary The world's population at the start of the 21 st century is about 6 billion. Of these, about 1 billion live in poverty and do not enjoy food security, despite the fact the world produces more than enough food. In the mid-21 st century, population is predicted to outstrip food production. What is needed is a ‘doubly green’ revolution to produce affordable food for the whole population of the world. Biotechnology, including the use of GM crops, could play a role in this. More GM research must be directed at the needs of less-developed countries. However, the commercial power in crop GM technology lies with a small number of large and powerful companies. This opens the way for exploitation of less-developed countries by the richer nations, on a purely commercial basis. A partnership approach between the private sector in developed countries and publicly or charitably funded research organisations is a possible way forward.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Part III : Ethical Issues in Agriculture and Food Production
    • 2. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    • 3. Keywords: Africa; food security; globalisation; GM; green revolution; India; justice; partnership; population; poverty Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    • 4. The world's population at the start of the 21 st century is about 6 billion. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    • 5. Of these, about 1 billion live in poverty and do not enjoy food security, despite the fact the world produces more than enough food. In the mid-21 st century, population is predicted to outstrip food production. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    • 6. What is needed is a ‘doubly green’ revolution to produce affordable food for the whole population of the world. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    • 7. Biotechnology, including the use of GM crops, could play a role in this. More GM research must be directed at the needs of less-developed countries. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    • 8. However, the commercial power in crop GM technology lies with a small number of large and powerful companies. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    • 9. This opens the way for exploitation of less-developed countries by the richer nations, on a purely commercial basis. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    • 10. A partnership approach between the private sector in developed countries and publicly or charitably funded research organisations is a possible way forward. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries

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