Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
2010 engine aftertreatment nrel
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

2010 engine aftertreatment nrel

1,105
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,105
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
28
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Biodiesel and 2010 Engine After­  Treatment Technology  Steve Howell  Technical Director  National Biodiesel Board  Presented at Alternative Fuels &  Vehicles National Conference and Expo  Tuesday, April 21, 2009
  • 2. Biodiesel and Advanced Emission  Controls  •  Thanks to Bob McCormick and Aaron Williams of NREL for  much of the content of these slides ­2010 
  • 3. How will the 2010 standards be met?  •  Introduction of ultra­low sulfur diesel fuel in October 2006  •  October 2008 ASTM approves up to 5% biodiesel as D975 fuel  • B6 to B20 ASTM standard also approved by ASTM: D7467  •  Intermediate EPA emissions standard for 2007:  • 0.01 g/bhp­h for PM, 1.2 g/bhp­h for NOx  • Diesel particle filters (DPF), un­burned diesel fuel for regeneration  • Increased levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and higher fuel  injection pressures  •  Full EPA emissions standard in 2010:  • 0.01 g/bhp­h for PM, 0.20 g/bhp­h for NOx  • DPF, EGR, high pressure fuel injection  • Exhaust catalysts for NOx reduction  •NOx adsorber catalysts, unburned diesel fuel for operation  •Selective catalytic reduction (SCR)  •Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) needed for SCR operation
  • 4. Diesel Particle Filters  •  Exhaust flows through porous wall­flow elements  –  PM is trapped on the walls of the filter  •  When exhaust temperature is high enough, PM is burned off  –  In most cases, unburned diesel fuel is injected to accomplish this  •  Precious metal is loaded onto filter walls to lower the  temperature required for regeneration  •  Issues:  –  Regeneration at low temperatures/duty cycles  –  Plugging with incombustible materials like lube oil ash
  • 5. Catalytic Control of NO  Emissions  x  •NO  Adsorber Catalyst (or lean NO  x  x  trap –LNT)  – Catalyst converts all NO  to NO  , adsorbent  x  2  bed “traps” NO 2  – When bed is saturated, exhaust is forced  “rich”  – NO  is released and converted to N2  2  – Bed also traps SO  , but doesn’t release it  2  NO  adsorber catalyst (NAC) is also  •  Near sulfur free exhaust is needed  x  known as a lean­NO  trap (LNT)  •  Higher temps, longer time needed to  x  release sulfur  – 90%+ conversion is possible  •Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR)  NOx + NH3  Sensor  – Used for industrial NO  control for many  x  years  – Requires a supplemental “reductant”  – Typically ammonia, derived from urea  SCR  •  “Diesel Exhaust Fluid”  – 80­90% reduction efficiency  Injection Urea  – Generally sulfur tolerant 
  • 6. NBB 2007/2010 OEM Program  Objective:  Investigate the impact of B20 and  lower biodiesel blends on 2007 and later fuel  system, engine, and emission control technology •  Major NBB/DOE Collaboration via CRADA  •  Ongoing program areas:  –  Light­duty diesel vehicle testing with DPF and NO x  control  –  Medium­duty engine testing with DPF and NO  control  x  –  Heavy­duty vehicle testing with active regen DPF  •  Ongoing and future program areas include  additional MD and HD testing with DPF and NOx  control systems, off­highway systems 
  • 7. Biodiesel Testing with DPF – MD Engine  •  Cummins ISB 300  –  2002 Engine, 2004 Certification  –  Cooled EGR, VGT  •  Johnson Matthey CCRT  –  12 Liter DPF  –  Passively Regenerated System  –  Pre Catalyst (NO  Production)  2  •  Fuels:  ULSD, B100, B20, B5  •  ReFUEL Test Facility  –  400 HP Dynamometer  –  Transient & Steady State Testing  •  Cummins  –  Soot Characterization  –  Significant financial support for  testing
  • 8. B20 Testing with DPF – HD FTP  B20 results in substantial PM reduction even with DPF  (data for 2003 Cummins ISB with Johnson Matthey CCRT on HD FTP)  Reduction with DPF ranges  from 20% to 70%, depending  on basefuel, test cycle, and  other factors  •  Reduction in sulfate  emissions  •  Increased PM reactivity  Williams, et al., “Effect of Biodiesel Blends on Diesel Particulate  Filter Performance” SAE 2006­01­3280
  • 9. Balance Point Temperature/Regeneration  Rate Results  BPT  • BPT is 40ºC lower for B20  ULSD  360ºC  • Soot is more easily burned off of filter  B20  320ºC  • B20 can be used for lower temperature duty cycle  B100  250ºC  • Regeneration rate increases with  increasing biodiesel content  • Even at 5%, biodiesel PM measurably  oxidizes more quickly
  • 10. Biodiesel and DPF operation  •  Biodiesel is compatible with Diesel Particulate  Filters, and has some distinct advantages:  –  Lowers regeneration temperatures  –  Less engine out particulate matter  –  May provide increased performance and decreased  maintenance vs. ULSD alone  –  May provide increased fuel economy  •  Regeneration mode is important  –  Late in­cylinder injection may cause increased fuel  dilution of engine oil and limit the level of biodiesel  that can be used (i.e. B20 or B5)  –  Most US heavy duty applications use exhaust  stream fuel injection which is compatible with B20,  perhaps higher blends  –  NBB is working closely with OEM’s in this area
  • 11. Biodiesel Testing with LD Emission Control Systems  •  Includes two emission control systems and two fuel blends  on a light­duty platform  –  NAC/DPF and SCR/DPF  –  5% and 20 % biodiesel blends  •  Performance, optimization and durability  –  Aging to represent 2100 hours of operation (approximately 120,00  miles or full useful life) for B20  –  Emissions evaluations over UDDS, US06, and HFET –conducted  by EPA  –  Perform engine and fuel component teardown at end of aging  Engine:  DCX OM646  Vehicle: Mercedes C200 CDI Vehicle: Mercedes C200 CDI 
  • 12. Test Results – EPA Chassis Dynamometer  NOx Adsorber Catalyst (NAC)  11  B20  10  PM  [mg/mile]  9  Cold LA4  50,000 mile  120,000 mile  8  Hot LA4  Standard  7  Standard  6  Composite FTP75  5  4  3  2  1  0  0.00  0.01  0.02  0.03  0.04  0.05  0.06  0.07  0.08  NOx  [g/mile]  11  10  ULSD PM  [mg/mile]  9  Cold LA4  50,000 mile  120,000 mile  8  Hot LA4  Standard  7  Standard  6  Composite FTP75  5  4  3  2  1  0  0.00  0.01  0.02  0.03  0.04  0.05  0.06  0.07  0.08  NOx  [g/mile] 
  • 13. Experimental Setup and Objectives: SCR  Diesel Particulate Filter  Diesel Particulate Filter  §  Compare SCR catalyst performance  §  §  JM CCRT (12 Liters)  JM CCRT (12 Liters)  with ULSD and Soy B20 through  §  §  Passively Regenerated  Passively Regenerated  engine testing  §  §  Pre Catalyst for NO  2  Production  Pre Catalyst for NO Production  2  §  Measure relative importance of catalyst  de­NOx Aftertreatment  de­NOx Aftertreatment  temp, exhaust chemistry and catalyst  §  JM Zeolite SCR (15.5 Liters)  §  JM Zeolite SCR (15.5 Liters)  space velocity  §  Urea Injection (air assisted)  §  Urea Injection (air assisted)  §  Measure B20’s impact on these  §  §  NH3 Slip Catalyst  NH3 Slip Catalyst  system variables and overall NOx  conversion  Diesel Engine  Diesel Engine  §  §  2002 Cummins ISB (300 hp)  2002 Cummins ISB (300 hp)  §  Focus on Steady­State Modal Testing  §  2004 Emissions Cert  §  2004 Emissions Cert  §  §  Cooled EGR, VGT, HPCR  Cooled EGR, VGT, HPCR Urea Injection  Diesel  Selective  NH3  DOC  Particulate  Catalytic  Slip  Filter  Reduction  Cat 
  • 14. ULSD vs B20 – SCR Overall NOx Conversion  §  No statistical difference in NOx Conversion with B20
  • 15. Conclusions:  •  NBB, the US Department of Energy, and the  engine and vehicle manufacturers are  expending significant resources to understand  how biodiesel blends interact with new diesel  emission controls  •  Detailed testing thus far indicates B20 and lower  blends are compatible with both diesel and NOx  after treatment  –  Provides benefits in some cases  •  B5 is now just part of normal D975 diesel fuel  •  Additional study is underway  –  Quantify long term benefits of biodiesel blends  –  Late in­cylinder injection may cause fuel dilution  –  NBB is encouraging OEM’s to publicly support B20