Keynote Speaker - E. Kevin Hrusovsky
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Keynote Speaker - E. Kevin Hrusovsky

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E. Kevin Hrusovsky, CEO & President of Caliper Life Science. Caliper is a premier provider of cutting-edge technologies enabling researchers in the life sciences industry to create life-saving and ...

E. Kevin Hrusovsky, CEO & President of Caliper Life Science. Caliper is a premier provider of cutting-edge technologies enabling researchers in the life sciences industry to create life-saving and enhancing medicines and diagnostic tests more quickly and efficiently. Caliper is aggressively innovating new technology to bridge the gap between in vitro assays and in vivo results, enabling researchers to translate those results into cures for human disease. Caliper’s portfolio of offerings includes state-of-the-art microfluidics, lab automation & liquid handling, tissue microscopy, preclinical imaging technologies, and discovery & development outsourcing solutions. For more information please visit www.caliperLS.com

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  • Need to personalize specific theraptutics – lots of money wasted in the older pharma model – recent report described that adverse drug reactions are now the 4th leading cause of death – and in terms of efficacy – some of the best thereputics until recently were only 60% efficacious – some particularly cancer therapeutics much worse
  • Mason Freeman is the MGH doc associated with Partners Health ..that is trying to change the IRB approaches

Keynote Speaker - E. Kevin Hrusovsky Keynote Speaker - E. Kevin Hrusovsky Presentation Transcript

  • Revolutionizing Health though a Bioeconomy 9th Annual Community College Program Day Kevin Hrusovsky, President, Life Sciences & Technology June 18th 20121 © © 2010PerkinElmer 2009 PerkinElmer
  • United Purpose Innovate disruptive technologies that enable early detection, next generation treatment and disease prevention while optimizing health at an individual level to eradicate disease and sustain earth’s ecosystem.2
  • Agenda 1 State of Health 2 Catalyzing a Bioeconomy 3 Disruptive Technology Enabling Personalized Health 53 Revolutionizing Global Health
  • Life Expectancy is Slowing Gains are Plateauing First time in 200 years, children’s life expectancy is shorter than parents4
  • Life Expectancy is Inversely Correlated w/ Energy Use Transporting 100 People Car Bus Bicycle http://www.howwedrive.com/2010/06/ Source: NEJM, 2005; AHRQ, 2006; CBO, 2008; CDC, 20095
  • While Healthcare may be Sick, There’s a Clear Path to 1306
  • Extending Life (77 to 84) with Today’s Medicine Double Costs $Billions But… -5% consume 50 -65+ spend 4x more7
  • A Revolution in Medicine is Needed to Extend Life Economically $2.5M Expand life from 77 to 100 years with Asymptomatic Medicine ~ ~8
  • Two out of Three Adults and Kids are Overweight  CDC - childhood diabetes & prediabetes has mushroomed from 9% in ’90 to 23% in ‘08  Costs quadrupling; $400B (NEJM, 2005; AHRQ, 2006; CBO, 2008; CDC, 2009)9
  • Sugar Content of Common Foods Disney: Quit junk food ads Michelle Obama: End Obesity NYC Mayor Bloomberg: Large Soda not a Right10
  • Population Growth Assaulting Ecosystems - Earth is Fighting Back! Industrial Revolution; 11:59:59 on Dec 31 1B 1800 Earth Life Humans 4.5B years old 2B years old 150,000 years old11
  • Population Growth Assaulting Ecosystems - Earth is Fighting Back! Industrial Revolution; 11:59:59 on Dec 31 2B 1B 1800 1930 Earth Life Humans 4.5B years old 2B years old 150,000 years old12
  • Population Growth Assaulting Ecosystems - Earth is Fighting Back! Industrial Revolution; 11:59:59 on Dec 31 3B 2B 1B 1800 1930 1960 Earth Life Humans 4.5B years old 2B years old 150,000 years old13
  • Population Growth Assaulting Ecosystems - Earth is Fighting Back! 7B Industrial Revolution; 11:59:59 on Dec 31 3B 2B 1B 1800 1930 1960 2011 Earth Life Humans 4.5B years old 2B years old 150,000 years old14
  • Population Growth Assaulting Ecosystems - World is Fighting Back! 7B Industrial Revolution; 11:59:59 on Dec 31 4.5B years of stored fossil fuel Greenhouse gas = 400 vs. 250ppm 3B 25k species go extinct/year 80 countries have no forest left 2B 1B 25 trucks of waste for 1 good 52k gallons of water per tree 1800 1930 1960 2011 Earth Life Humans 4.5B years old 2B years old 150,000 years old15
  • Genotype Phenotype codes for 25+ years ago But Today, Environmental Factors complicate the Phenotype ABC ? ABC XYZ16
  • Environment Linked to Explosion in NCDs Radiation Stress Life-Style Internal chemical environment Exposome Xenobiotics Reactive electrophiles Inflammation Metals Infections Preexisting disease Endocrine disrupters Lipid peroxidation Immune modulators Oxidative stress Receptor-binding proteins Gut flora Drugs Epigenetics Diet Pollution 17Science (2010)
  • The 69-year-old sun exposure as a trucker. Condition known as photoaging is caused by the suns UVA rays.18
  • Environment is Linked to Explosion of NCD Incidence Explosion in non-communicable disease (NCD):  Cancer kills ~8M / year will rise ~72% by 2030  T2 diabetes affects 346M  will double by 2030  Autism affects 1/88 kids  rose 57x in ~40y  Upsurge in asthma, rhinitis, food allergies Epigenetics is emerging as key link between environment & NCD epidemic Only 25% explained by genetics alone Environmental factors have been implicated 19Science (2010)
  • Global Cancer Cases Could Rise 75% by 2030 5 Most Commonly Diagnosed Cancer in 2008 (incidence per 100,000) *Very Highly Developed Countries $$$$ Men Women June 1, 2012• Cancer is #1 cause of deathin high-income countries Highly Developed Countries $$$• Cancer will be major causeof death in every region Moderately Developed Countries $$ $$• Cancer will rise from 12.7Min 2008 to 22.2M by 2030Wealthiest are 15% of the world’s Under-Developed Countries $$population BUT bear 40% of thecancer burden:+ : SCREENING- : WESTERN LIFETYLE20 Take Away Goes Here
  • Breast Cancer – A Global Scourge Global Incidence of Breast Cancer: 1,384,000 women diagnosed in 2008 Find & Measure CTCs Diagnosis Prognosis 1 in 1B Prediction of Response Circulating Tumor Cells hold great promise !21
  • Are We Over-Testing / Treating? http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2011/08/14/some-medical-tests-procedures-do-more-harm-than-good.html22
  • Many “Advances” are Actually Harmful http://positivesideeffects.com/2011/07/09/medical-care-3rd-leading-cause-of-death/23
  • Only 25% of Cancer Drugs Work: $1 Trillion Wasted Dual toxicity/efficacy challenge associated with the current drug-development model Efficacy rate with standard treatment Depression 62% Toxicity Challenge Schizophrenia 60% Cardiac arrhythmias 60% Adverse drug reactions Asthma 60% Diabetes 57% 4th leading cause of death Osteoporosis 48% Annual costs of approximately US$177B Hepatitis C 47% Alzheimer disease 30% Cancer (all types) 25% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% “If not for the great variability among individuals, medicine might have been a science and not an art.” Sir William Osler (1849-1919)24
  • State of Health Life Expectancy Declining Cost of Healthcare Skyrocketing Global Access Insufficient Population Exploding Earth Traumatized – Jeopardizing Sustainable Growth Environmental Disease Factors are Accelerating Many of today’s medicines are unsafe and ineffective25
  • Emerging “Health” Market… Healthier Genes Surrogate Markers Personalized Proteomics Medical SNPs Intervention Probability of Disease Lifestyle Environmental Modification Impacts Longer Lives Enabling Personalized Health26 Source: http://www.slideshare.net/jcanton/future-of-health-care-presentation
  • Agenda 1 State of Health Disruptive Technology Enabling 2 Personalized Health 3 Catalyzing a Bioeconomy 527 Revolutionizing Global Health
  • Three Vectors that Enable Health28
  • Disruptive Tools to Revolutionize Health LIFE SCIENCES & TECHNOLOGY INFORMATICS GENOMIC ANALYSIS BIOTHERAPEUTICSIMAGING & PATHOLOGY TARGETED SMALL MOLECULE BIOMARKERS CELLULAR SYSTEMS Prevention29
  • The Challenge Facing Our Customers Reverse the Decline in Drug Discovery Productivity $1B / 15 years DNA, RNA Cell Small Animal Tissue Human Protein In Vitro In Vivo Biomarkers Current 99%+ attrition in Focus on Big Need predictive enabling pre-clinical Four - Cancer, industry (adverse drug tests (humanistic personalized CVS, Stroke and models) detection and trends: reactions) Diabetes therapy30
  • The Challenge Facing Our Customers Reverse the Decline in Drug Discovery Productivity DNA, RNA Cell Small Animal Tissue Human Protein In Vitro In Vivo31
  • Revolutionary Technology: I-I-H Bridge Strategic Goal Clinical sequencing capabilities The Issue is the Tissue Clinical High multiplexing Automated tissue Dx platform Human Accelerate pre-clinical imaging Translational imaging probesDATA QUALITY Tissue LDT to IVD capability Global IVD and PMA High content assays platforms Stem cell capabilities QSR/ Dx kit manufacturing Small Animal Multiplex DNA/RNA Pre-Clinical More from less faster better Cell Dx and CDx Informatics systems Integrated informatics; research & development to DNA, RNA clinical trials Protein in vitro to in vivo to human COST OF TESTING32
  • Automated Microfluidic Platforms for Enabling Genomics Integrated Next Gen Sequencing Sample Prep Sample Prep Detection Informatics Next Gen Sequencing33
  • Innovative Biomarkers & Imaging to Enable Translational Research Oncology Hypoxia Folate Her2/Neu Annexin Liver Toxicology Cardiovascular Adaptation of Integrin αvβ3 select serum markers for inInfectious disease Cathepsins B, L, S situ imaging Bacteria MMPs 2, 7, 9, 13 Vascular Neutrophil Elastase Inflammation Cathepsin K Bone Biology Arthritis Hydroxyapatite Gastric Emptying Physiologic Hypertension Renin34 From Bench to Clinic: I-I-H Bridge
  • Traditional Pathology is “Prone to Error” 60X 90,000 Ductal Carcinoma in Multiple biomarker Circulating Tumor Cells situ (D.C.I.S.) accumulated classification cases misdiagnosed Do more with less faster and 1 in 1B more precisely* 35 New York Times, Prone to Error: Earliest Steps to Find Cancer (2010) Improving Clinical Relevance
  • Multiplex Tumor Characterization First application - lung cancer ALK multiplexed others adeno. squamous MET ROS • Shrinking Sample • Multiple Biomarkers • NGS36 Synergistic Technologies Increase Clinical Accuracy
  • “Driving Medicine Below the Symptom Line” Post Treatment Testing Drug / Device Intervention Disease Progression Diagnosis – Symptoms Appear Prognosis Screening Healthy Predisposition TestingSource: millennium Predictive Medicine; Start-up 2000 37Source: http://www.slideshare.net/jcanton/future-of-health-care-presentation Three Vectors that Enable Health
  • PerkinElmer Health Lifestyle Diagnostics Environmental Characteristics Environmental LST Settings Informatics38
  • Agenda 1 State of Health 2 Disruptive Technology Enabling Personalized Health 3 Catalyzing a Bioeconomy 539 Revolutionizing Global Health
  • The President’s Bioeconomy Blueprint – A Roadmap for the US In April 2012, the White House unveiled a “Bioeconomy Blueprint” to harness innovations in biological research to address national challenges in: Health Food Energy Environment40
  • New Fast-Growing Bio Markets Nanotechnology Molecular Diagnostics $1.6 Trillion (by 2015, global) $15 Billion (by 2014, global) Food Safety Metabolomics (contaminants, pathogens, GMOs) $864 Million (by 2018, global) $4.6 Billion (by 2016, US alone)41
  • Strategic Objectives of the Bioeconomy Blueprint Five Strategic Objectives : 1: Support R&D investments that will provide the foundation for the future US bioeconomy 2: Facilitate transition of bioinventions from research lab to markets (translation) 3: Reform regulations to reduce costs & increase speed , while protecting human & environmental health 4: Update training programs & align academic institutions incentives with student training for national workforce needs 5: Identify & support opportunities for public-private partnerships ULTIMATE GOAL: Generate economic growth & address societal needs EXECUTION: Demands a skilled & innovative work force – a new generation of42 biotechnologists
  • Bioeconomy Blueprint – Fostering the Right Workforce The Bioeconomy Blueprint” highlights the critical roll of Community Colleges in building American Skills: Largest component of the Nation’s higher education system Enroll >7.6M students Work with businesses to create tailored programs that meet local economic needs43
  • Bioeconomy – Fostering the Right Attitude Accelerate Disruptive Innovation Implementation Vision Strategic Roadmap Culture - Leadership 360 Market Immersion44
  • Bioeconomy Blueprint – Fostering Public-Private Partnerships Government – Academia – Pharma – Med Inst Collaboration IRB re-invention Bringing technology, discovery, and development closer to patients45
  • Personalized Health Innovation Center of Excellence Located in Hopkinton, Massachusetts Fully operational in late 2012 350 jobs in Center of Excellence Will utilize “state of the art” innovation practices46
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