Stem Cell Technologies:Stem Cell Technologies:
New ProgramNew Program
Development,Development,
Sustainability &Sustainabil...
Overview
I.The Biology of Human Stem Cells
I.What is the Impact of the Stem Cell sector on the
Global & US Bioeconomy?
III...
Human Stem Cells
Steve Gschmeissner/Science Photo Library
Key Scientific Stem Cell Discoveries
hESC from Human Blastocysts
(Thomson et al, 1998)
Induced Pluripotent Cell Lines
Deri...
What defines a ‘stem cell’?
• Stem Cells are capable of replication and self-renewal
• They are undifferentiated, and can ...
Stem Cell ‘Potency’
STEM CELLSSTEM CELLS
220 cell-types that make up the ~ 50 trillion cells
in the human body.
Sigmaaldri...
Clinical and Therapeutic Applications
for Stem Cells
 Drug toxicity & efficacy screening (Stemina, InVivo Sciences) .
 S...
Different Types of Stem Cells
Human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC)
Tissue Specific Somatic or Adult Stem Cells
(ASCs)
Indu...
Muscle
Gut
Skin
Brain
Pancreas
Human Embryonic Stem Cells
(hES cells)
•hESCs are PLURIPOTENT.
•Derived from donated IVF em...
Tissue Specific (Adult Stem Cells)
• Limited growth
•Multipotent: able to differentiate into
SOME but not ALL (tissue spec...
Reprogrammed
stem cell
Skin
Stem cell genes
Somatic Cells
Thomson lab, 2008
Yamanaka lab,
2008
Induced Pluripotent
Stem Ce...
• iPS cells are PLURIPOTENT
• They are adult cells (differentiated) that have been genetically ‘reprogrammed’
to an embryo...
Robinton, D.A & Daley, G.Q. (2012) The promise of induced pluripotent stem cells
In research and therapy. Nature 481. 295-...
What is projected impact of stem cells on
the Global & US bioeconomy?
Impact of Stem Cell Science on the
Global Bio-Economy
•200+ Stem Cell Companies worldwide & over 5000 Clinical Trials
•Rep...
NEW YORK STEM CELL SUMMIT 2012
Projected Markets for Stem Cell Products in the US: 2015-2020
(numbers x $1,000). The US co...
How do we meet the demand for a highly
Skilled workforce in Stem Cell Technologies?
NSF ATE-funded Project Grant in
Human Stem Cells (NSF DUE 1104210
II. Stem Cell Instruction Modules for the AAS Biotechnol...
2-semester Certificate Program
Course Content
SEMESTER I Courses: Introduction
to Human Stem Cell Technologies
•Aseptic Te...
Program Development FAQ
I.What equipment and reagents do we need to run a
Stem Cell Course?
II. How what are the costs to ...
Required Equipment
Biological Safety Cabinets (BSLII) $6000.00
CO2 + Temp Incubators $4000.00
Microscopes (inverted) $ Var...
Specialty Bioreagents Per Course
1. Stem Cell Culture Media $200-500 / 500mL X 16
2. bFGF media supplement $161 / 10µg X 4...
• For a 16-week Animal Cell Culturing Course, with 18 students
Expenses for consumables and bioreagents cost ~ $5000.
SUST...
Specialty Bioreagents Per Course
( with in house production)
ESTIMATED REAGENT COST PER
16 WK COURSE / 18 STUDENTS $ ~1500...
HOW CAN WE ACCOMPLISH THIS?
SUSTAINABILITY
1. “in house” cloning & expression of recombinant
factors required to supplemen...
Program Materials Dissemination
Summer 2014 Workshop for Educators
(Biologic Reagents / Cloning & Purification)
Date: TBD
...
Contact Information
•Dr. Lisa Seidman, Ph.D
PI, Biotechnology Program Director
(608) 246-6204
lseidman@matcmadison.edu
•Dr...
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Stem Cell Technologies: New program development, sustainability, and dissemination

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Dr. Thomas Tubon from Madison College talks about keeping stem cell education affordable for students.

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Stem Cell Technologies: New program development, sustainability, and dissemination

  1. 1. Stem Cell Technologies:Stem Cell Technologies: New ProgramNew Program Development,Development, Sustainability &Sustainability & Dissemination WorkshopDissemination Workshop Photo: Cody Davis
  2. 2. Overview I.The Biology of Human Stem Cells I.What is the Impact of the Stem Cell sector on the Global & US Bioeconomy? III.NSF ATE-Funded Project Grant in Stem Cells -Program Development -AAS, Certificate Program, Short Course, & Workshops IV.Sustainability V. Dissemination
  3. 3. Human Stem Cells Steve Gschmeissner/Science Photo Library
  4. 4. Key Scientific Stem Cell Discoveries hESC from Human Blastocysts (Thomson et al, 1998) Induced Pluripotent Cell Lines Derived From Human Somatic Cells (Yu et al, 2007; Takahashi et al., 2007) 1981 Evans, Kaufman, & Martin: Mouse ES cells from the inner Cell mass Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived from SCNT (Tachibana et al, 2013)
  5. 5. What defines a ‘stem cell’? • Stem Cells are capable of replication and self-renewal • They are undifferentiated, and can be induced to differentiate into multiple cell types. (Cell Potency)
  6. 6. Stem Cell ‘Potency’ STEM CELLSSTEM CELLS 220 cell-types that make up the ~ 50 trillion cells in the human body. Sigmaaldrich.com
  7. 7. Clinical and Therapeutic Applications for Stem Cells  Drug toxicity & efficacy screening (Stemina, InVivo Sciences) .  Spinal Cord Injury (Neuralstem, NSI-566), Heart Disease (Capricor), and Diabetes (Stemedica Cell Technologies).  Cranio-facial reconstruction & bone replacement using 3D biodegradable matrices (UW Madison SCRMC) .  Macular degeneration (Advanced Cell Technologies).  Blood banks & blood-based disease therapies.  Tissue engineering & replacement.  Cell therapies for neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimers, Parkinsons, Huntington’s, ALS).
  8. 8. Different Types of Stem Cells Human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC) Tissue Specific Somatic or Adult Stem Cells (ASCs) Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Human Nuclear Transfer ESCs (NT-ESCs / SCNT) (Mitalipov, Cell 15 May 2013)
  9. 9. Muscle Gut Skin Brain Pancreas Human Embryonic Stem Cells (hES cells) •hESCs are PLURIPOTENT. •Derived from donated IVF embryos. •Currently, there are 156 eligible hESC cell lines listed under the NIH registry for use in government-sponsored research. •15 hESC cell lines, including H9s (WAO9) originate from and are distributed through WiCell. •“Gold standard” for the stem cell field.
  10. 10. Tissue Specific (Adult Stem Cells) • Limited growth •Multipotent: able to differentiate into SOME but not ALL (tissue specific) cell types •Most promise for ‘ready’ autologous and Brain cells
  11. 11. Reprogrammed stem cell Skin Stem cell genes Somatic Cells Thomson lab, 2008 Yamanaka lab, 2008 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC)
  12. 12. • iPS cells are PLURIPOTENT • They are adult cells (differentiated) that have been genetically ‘reprogrammed’ to an embryonic cell-like state through forced expression of a subset of genes. • Morphologically identical to hESCs in culture. • Used for drug screening and toxicity assays, modeling of human diseases, and Autologous transplantation for cell-based therapies. • Can be induced to differentiate into each of the 3 germ cell lineages. iPShESC Image: Jeanne Loring, Scripps Research Institute Thomson: Oct4, Sox2, NANOG, & LIN28 Yamanka: Oct3/4, Sox2, KLF4 & c- Myc Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC)
  13. 13. Robinton, D.A & Daley, G.Q. (2012) The promise of induced pluripotent stem cells In research and therapy. Nature 481. 295-305 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) & Personalized Medicine
  14. 14. What is projected impact of stem cells on the Global & US bioeconomy?
  15. 15. Impact of Stem Cell Science on the Global Bio-Economy •200+ Stem Cell Companies worldwide & over 5000 Clinical Trials •Reported Global forecasts of $7.3 Billion in revenue by 2014, and over $16 Billion by 2020 •Market expansion driven by new stem cell treatments and increased uptake of technologies towards drug development assays •Global impact of clinical stem cell therapeutics include: Diabetes, HIV, and Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). In addition: Cardiovascular Disorders, Autoimmune Diseases, Metabolic Disorders, and other conditions with projected breakthroughs in commercial-based treatments by 2020. In 2012, much of the revenues from transplants of bone marrow, peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood form the base of the marketplace. This leading edge is predicted to drive the first tangible clinical therapeutics by 2020. https://www.asdreports.com/shopexd.asp?id=18426&desc=Stem+Cell+Technologies%3A+World+Market+Outlook+2012%2D2022
  16. 16. NEW YORK STEM CELL SUMMIT 2012 Projected Markets for Stem Cell Products in the US: 2015-2020 (numbers x $1,000). The US covers 60% of the Stem Cell Market Impact of Stem Cell Science on the US Market
  17. 17. How do we meet the demand for a highly Skilled workforce in Stem Cell Technologies?
  18. 18. NSF ATE-funded Project Grant in Human Stem Cells (NSF DUE 1104210 II. Stem Cell Instruction Modules for the AAS Biotechnology Program Variations of a Theme: I. 2-Semester Certificate in Human Stem Cell Technologies III. 1-Day Workshops in Human Stem Cell Technologies IV. 5-Day Short Course
  19. 19. 2-semester Certificate Program Course Content SEMESTER I Courses: Introduction to Human Stem Cell Technologies •Aseptic Techniques •Discovery and Derivation of human Stem Cells (hESC, iPS, & Adult) •Bioethics, Policy and Regulations. •PSC Culture, passage, & maintenance. •Cryostorage & Cell Banking. •Feeder-Dependent & Feeder-Independent culturing systems. •Microscopic and molecular characterization of cell pluripotency. SEMESTER II: Advanced Human Stem Cell Technologies •Comparative analysis of human embryonic stem cells & inducible pluripotent stem cells (hESC H9/iPS IMR90-4). •Techniques for genetic reprogramming and establishment of human iPS Cell lines. •Comparative Methods for generation of PSC cell aggregates – EBs. •Spontaneous and Directed PSC differentiation into Neurons, Cardiomyocytes, & Hepatocytes
  20. 20. Program Development FAQ I.What equipment and reagents do we need to run a Stem Cell Course? II. How what are the costs to run a human Stem Cell Course? III. What instructional materials are available? IV. Where can course instructors get exposure to handling human Stem Cells in culture?
  21. 21. Required Equipment Biological Safety Cabinets (BSLII) $6000.00 CO2 + Temp Incubators $4000.00 Microscopes (inverted) $ Varies Pipette Aids (Serological) $300.00 Dedicated 4C Storage (Fridge) $1000.00 Dedicated -20C Storage (Freezer) $1000.00 LN2 storage tank $ Varies REQUIRED EQUIPMENT: $15-20K Biological Safety Cabinets (BSLII) $6000.00 CO2 + Temp Incubators $4000.00 Microscopes (inverted) $ Varies Pipette Aids (Serological) $300.00 Dedicated 4C Storage (Fridge) $1000.00 Dedicated -20C Storage (Freezer) $1000.00 LN2 storage tank $ Varies REQUIRED EQUIPMENT: $15-20K
  22. 22. Specialty Bioreagents Per Course 1. Stem Cell Culture Media $200-500 / 500mL X 16 2. bFGF media supplement $161 / 10µg X 4 3. Biomatrices for seeding cells $400 / X 1 4. Serum / KOSR $283 / 500mL X 1 5. Human Stem Cells $1000 / vial X 1 1. Stem Cell Culture Media $200-500 / 500mL X 16 2. bFGF media supplement $161 / 10µg X 4 3. Biomatrices for seeding cells $400 / X 1 4. Serum / KOSR $283 / 500mL X 1 5. Human Stem Cells $1000 / vial X 1 ESTIMATED REAGENT COST PER 16 WK COURSE / 18 STUDENTS $ 11,000 ESTIMATED REAGENT COST PER 16 WK COURSE / 18 STUDENTS $ 11,000
  23. 23. • For a 16-week Animal Cell Culturing Course, with 18 students Expenses for consumables and bioreagents cost ~ $5000. SUSTAINABILITY • For a 16-week Human Stem Cell Course, with 18 students Expenses for consumables and bioreagents cost ~ $11,000.
  24. 24. Specialty Bioreagents Per Course ( with in house production) ESTIMATED REAGENT COST PER 16 WK COURSE / 18 STUDENTS $ ~1500.00 ESTIMATED REAGENT COST PER 16 WK COURSE / 18 STUDENTS $ ~1500.00
  25. 25. HOW CAN WE ACCOMPLISH THIS? SUSTAINABILITY 1. “in house” cloning & expression of recombinant factors required to supplement specialized media (Lucigen, Expresso Enzyme Free Cloning) 2.“in house” production of iPS Stem Cells at MATC Invitrogen Cyto-tune Technology (one time cost) 3. Switch to powdered DMEM/F12 Base media (Sigma Aldrich, 50L of Media = $289)
  26. 26. Program Materials Dissemination Summer 2014 Workshop for Educators (Biologic Reagents / Cloning & Purification) Date: TBD Lab Manual / WiCell Protocols Lecture Materials (Bio-Link Clearinghouse)
  27. 27. Contact Information •Dr. Lisa Seidman, Ph.D PI, Biotechnology Program Director (608) 246-6204 lseidman@matcmadison.edu •Dr. Thomas Tubon, Ph.D. Co-PI, Faculty (608)246-6875 tubon@matcmadison.edu Dr. Jeanette Mowery, Ph.D. Co-PI, Faculty jmowery@matcmadison.edu

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