• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
International Perspectives on Digital Copyright   Arthur Hoyle, Univ of Canberra
 

International Perspectives on Digital Copyright Arthur Hoyle, Univ of Canberra

on

  • 904 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
904
Views on SlideShare
571
Embed Views
333

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

2 Embeds 333

http://copyrightandtechnology.com 330
http://www.google.com 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    International Perspectives on Digital Copyright   Arthur Hoyle, Univ of Canberra International Perspectives on Digital Copyright Arthur Hoyle, Univ of Canberra Presentation Transcript

    • Arthur HoyleSenior Lecturer in Law and Technology School of Law University of Canberra
    • W ill l k t f l tWe will look at a few relevant cases the history of copyright represents a continual struggle  between public and private rights, with first one and  then other gaining a temporary ascendency I want to look briefly at a number of recent Australian  cases, and in particular:  cases  and in particular:   Ice TV,   Kazaa,   Larrikin Records  iiiNet ; and  Optus
    • Ice TV The pre‐existing relevant law represented a rejection  of the American Feist line on originality in  compilations by the Australian courts The High Court of Australia rejected Nine’s complaint   The High Court of Australia rejected Nine s complaint,  saying that there was little substantial originality in  arranging a list the time and title information in  g g chronological order.
    • The Larrikin Records case Kookaburra Sings in the Old Gum Tree is and old  Australian song created for a competitionCCopyright purchased for $6,000 from an estate sale i h  h d f    f       l Fifty years later Men At Work recorded Do you come  from the Land Downunder which was alleged by  Larrikin to contain elements of Kookaburra in a flute  riff subsequently added by Greg Hay q y y g y
    • Hay Admitted‘It was inadvertent, naive, unconscious, and by the time Men At work recorded the song, it had become unrecognisable.unrecognisable
    • Relevant Materials http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbsfupH8W1o&fea ture=related (play to 1:06) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IT8SHafGIpU&fea ture=related ture related (start at 1:30 and go to 2:36) http://www youtube com/watch?v=OZzm1C‐ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZzm1C‐ NlME&feature=related
    • The Court Found There was objective similarity sufficient to be classified  as breach, but It did not amount to a finding that the flute riff is a   did         fi di   h   h  fl   iff i     substantial part of ‘Down Under’ or that it is indeed  the  hook  of that song the ‘hook’ of that song The 40% to 60% damages claimed were "excessive,  over‐reaching and unrealistic“ g Were assessed as 5% going back only to 2002
    • A Shift in Judicial treatment of A Shift in Judicial treatment of  Copyright? Seen in the context of Ice TV, this was seen by many in  the interested legal community as indicating a  discernible shift in the court s view of copyright and its  di ibl   hift i  th   t’   i   f  i ht  d it   enforceability through a distinct softening in the  sanctions
    • Th Sh K The Sharman or Kazaa case Sharman Networks and certain others associated with  the Kazaa P2P “file sharing” software were liable for  the authorisation of copyright infringement engaged  in by Kazaa users. The Judge expressed the view that “it has long been  The Judge expressed the view that  it has long been  obvious that those (warnings in end user agreements)  measures are ineffective to prevent, or even  substantially to curtail, copyright infringements by  users”
    • Kazaa His Honour stated that he wished to be careful in  protecting copyright whilst balancing the rights of  subscribers to freedom of expression and  communication where no infringement occurs The court could be seen as pushing back against large  scale claims of this type, and this was to at least  yp partially proven to be the case in the later iiiNet case
    • The iiNet case AFACT sent notices to iiNet, attaching information  allegedly demonstrating that iiNet users were using  BitTorrent to infringe the film companies’ copyright to infringe the film companies  copyright the court reviewed not only the Kazaa decision but all  relevant precedent including  Moorhouse, Jain, Metro,  Cooper and K C   d Kazaa It found that “the means by which the applicants  copying is infringed is in iiNet users use of the  users  use of the  constituent parts of the BitTorrent system. IiNet has  no control over the BitTorrent system and is not  responsible for the operation of the BitTorrent system” system
    • The situation in Australia post iiNetThe situation in Australia post‐  the mere provision of the facility to copy is not  considered sufficient to render the supplier of the  service guilty of any act that affects a third party  undertaken using that service  The High Court in its ruling on an appeal from the  Federal Court held that iiNet had no direct technical  power to prevent its customer from using the  BitTorrent system, and that iiNet’s only power was  indirect
    • The Optus Case p Optus used a minimal delay before they rebroadcast  material originally sold by the football codes to Telstra  i l  i i ll   ld b   h  f b ll  d    T l   under a process by which Optus customers can record  and watch matches screened on free‐to‐air television  and replay with delays as short as two minutes on some  devices An appeal panel of the Federal Court overturned the  decision, finding that the Betamax precedent was  inapplicable This reinforced the status quo, and in doing so  restated the validity of contractual arrangements  involving the assignment of copyright
    • The Struggle therefore continues The struggle therefore between public and private  rights in the use of materials produced by others goes  on, but is seems that the ever present pendulum is  now swinging back towards the public interest at the  expense of the private one