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    BoP from Online Community Unconference 2009 BoP from Online Community Unconference 2009 Document Transcript

    • Online Community Unconference:Book of ProceedingsHeld June 10, 2009 in Mountain View, CANotes gathered and compiled by Heidi Nobantu Saul and Zoë Hollister
    • Executive SummaryWe had an amazing day at the Online Community Unconference yesterday. Over 220people attended the event and the agenda included 57 breakout sessions throughoutthe day on topics including: • Identifying and Engaging with Online Influencers • Social Psychology 101 for Community Managers • W.O.M. Branding - Mobilizing Advocates and Brand Citizenship • Online Community for Social Good/Change (Non Profits, Multiple Stakeholders) • Super Tools for Super Users - Next Generation UI and Technology BrainstormMost session notes are available via the Unconference wiki:http://www.socialtext.net/ocu2009Key Blog Posts:My take-away from the Online Community Unconference - Open BusinessOnline Community Unconference 2009- the grouperyBack From the Online Community Unconference - Tom HumbargerBack from Online Communities Unconference 2009 - Stefano Maffulli#ocu2009 Community Jobs Wanted - Janet FoutsReflecting on #IABC09 and #OCU2009 - AudioBoo (Bryan Person)Twitter Streams:#ocu2009#octribePictures:http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=ocu2009
    • TABLE OF CONTENTS:INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................5OPEN SPACE FIRST SESSION TOPICS ..................................................7HOW TO DEFEND THE VALUE OF YOUR COMMUNITIES: ROI (1A) .................................................... 8MANAGING THE MOB- W HEN THINGS GO W RONG (1B) .................................................................10HOW TO MANAGE MULTIPLE PERSONALITIES (1C)........................................................................14SOCIAL CRM (1D) ......................................................................................................................17ONLINE RECOMMENDATIONS (1E)................................................................................................21METRICS FOR MEASURING COMMUNITY HEALTH (1F) ...................................................................23HOW TO NURTURE A THRIVING OPEN SOURCE COMMUNITY IN A COMMERCIAL OPEN SOURCECONTEXT (1G) ...........................................................................................................................26METRICS FOR MEASURING COMMUNITY HEALTH (1H) ...................................................................27USING OTHER SOCIAL MEDIA NETWORKS TO BUILD YOUR COMMUNITY (1I) ...................................31RECOVERY.GOV – MYTH OR REALITY (1J)....................................................................................34SOCIAL MEDIA VIRGINS (1J) ........................................................................................................37OPEN SPACE SECOND SESSION TOPICS ...........................................38THE TRAINWRECK THAT IS THE DISTRIBUTED CONVERSATION (2A) ................................................39STRATEGY AND COMMUNITIES (2B) .............................................................................................41USING STRATEGY AND COMMUNITIES (2C) CONVENER: NILOFER MERCHANT ................................45ONLINE PUBLICATIONS COMMUNITY EFFORST: W HAT’S W RONG, W HAT’S NOT, WHAT’S NEXT-ONLINE PUBLICATIONS AND SITES OF PRINT PUBLICATION (2D).....................................................49HOW DOES ONLINE COMMUNITY HELP LOCAL BUSINESSES GENERATE TRAFFIC (2E) ....................51GENERALS, COLONELS AND COMMUNITY (2F) ..............................................................................54SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING (2G) ................................................................................................55IDENTIFYING AND ENGAGING ONLINE INFLUENCERS (2H) ..............................................................58BIG COMMUNITY: STRATEGY ACROSS YOUR ECOSYSTEM (2I).......................................................60SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 101 FOR COMMUNITY MANAGERS (2J)........................................................63SELECTING THE RIGHT COMMUNITY PLATFORM (2L).....................................................................70OPEN SPACE THIRD SESSION TOPICS................................................72W.O.M. BRANDING (3B)..............................................................................................................73COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS FOR COMMUNITY MANAGERS (HOW TO EFFECTIVELY BE AN ADVOCATE FORUSERS AND YOUR COMPANY) (3D) ...............................................................................................75IF YOU BUILD IT THEY WILL COME. NOT. TIPS AND TRICKS FOR GROWING COMMUNITY (3E).............77B2B COMMUNITIES - W HAT WORKS, BEST PRACTICES FROM THE PAST 10 YEARS OF B2BCOMMUNITY MANAGEMENT (3F) ..................................................................................................79HOW TO ENGAGE COMMUNITIES OUTSIDE OF TRADITIONAL DISCUSSION BOARDS (3G) ..................81ONLINE COMMUNITY FOR SOCIAL GOOD AND CHANGE (3H) ..........................................................82SOCIAL NETWORK SOCIOLOGY ANALYSIS (3J)..............................................................................87WHAT IS COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP? (3K).....................................................................................89
    • OPEN SPACE FOURTH SESSION TOPICS............................................93ACCELERATING COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE SCORING (4A) ...........................................................94SUPER TOOLS FOR SUPER USERS (4D) .......................................................................................95MISSION ALIGNED TWITTERING (4E) ........................................................................................98MOVING BEYOND METRICS TO ROI (4F) ....................................................................................100CHANGING PLATFORMS AND VENDORS (4G) ..............................................................................103PURPOSEFUL COMMUNITIES (4H) ..............................................................................................105TWITTER FOR DUMMIES BY TWO TWITTER DUMMIES (4I)..............................................................107THE FUTURE OF DISTRIBUTED VS CLOSED COMMUNITIES (4K) ....................................................109OPEN SPACE FIFTH SESSION TOPICS ..............................................112COMMUNITY DRIVEN PRODUCT DESIGN- COLLECTING FEEDBACK FROM YOUR COMMUNITY: SCALE,SUSTAINABLE FUN (5A).............................................................................................................113ARE W E A COMMUNITY TOO? (5E) ............................................................................................115WHAT AND HOW TO MEASURE ENGAGEMENT (5I) .......................................................................120USING ONLINE COMMUNITIES FOR CUSTOMER SUPPORT (5L) ....................................................122
    • IntroductionJune 29, 2009 | Sonoma, CADear Reader,Our intention in continuing to host the Online Community Unconference series is asimple one. We believe that online community and social media professionalsrepresent the best sources of information on creating healthy and sustainable onlinecommunities.There is a rich base of largely untapped knowledge in this emergent community ofpractitioners. Connecting this community, and tapping in to this community’s collectiveknowledge and real world experience is exactly what we intended to do during theUnconference.Whether you attended and participated in the Online Community Unconference, or areexperiencing the Unconference by reading this book of proceedings, I hope you find thecontent valuable and useful in your day-to-day work.I owe a debt of gratitude to several organizations and individuals for their support,guidance and enthusiasm during the planning phase of the Online CommunityUnconference.Our Sponsors: • Boonex – http://www.boonex.com • Egret Endeavors - http://www.egretendeavors.com/ • Omnifuse – http://www.omnifuse.comEvent Staff: • Event Coordination: Zoë Hollister • Facilitation: Kaliya Hamlin • Newsroom Management & Note Coordination: Heidi Nobantu Saul • Marketing & Promotional Support: Heather VirgaI welcome any questions, comments or discussion about the Online CommunityUnconference, and I wish you success in your community-building efforts.Best,Bill JohnstonChief Community OfficerForum One Networks(415) 299.9638 | bjohnston@forumone.com
    • Bill Johnston welcoming the crowd during opening remarks.A glance at theAgenda in betweensessions Jim Cashel assisting at the Agenda grid.
    • Open Space First Session TopicsMorning conversations over coffee anticipating the start of the Online CommunityUnconference 2009.
    • How to Defend the Value of Your Communities: ROI (1A)Convener: Jim Weldon, @jimwsourcenNotes-taker(s): Christine TranOther Members:Amy Garza Rachel RomeroPaul Mikolay Dave WadeAlexa Bruce Jim WeldonJen NestelPerrine CramptonDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Questions to Tackle: How do we get money? How do we defend How do you determine the ROI? Implications of downtown and impact on ROI What are the key metrics? How to use them to show value? How to predict the ROI for a new community? What do people want to measure?The single most difficult problem to solve is how to determine ROI and defendcommunity. What is the outcome you want from your community? Google analytics are aiming low; need to dig in more Southwest Airlines measures everything, from how long you wait in line for every process; they track many pieces to get to one ROI: How happy are our customers? We can track 255 metrics for communities, but what is your goal/outcome? What is the behavior of the members in the community? Get your goal first, and then you can build the metrics. Most people let communities run itself, but usually this is a disaster. Yahoo and Google can do this it’s fine. You need to dig deeper o Did they give us an idea that we generated revenue from? o Did they make a recommendation to another customer? Two types of communities: Affinity brands that don’t have to do anything. Then there’s everyone else who has to figure out what to do to engage. o Start with controversial topics to get them going. o Find out what everybody is pissed off about. o Get them there and then figure out what else to do. o Vanilla communities are lame Using tools to figure out what people are doing on an automated basis o In a community, go in and extract what they’re talking about.
    • To figure out your ROI: Know what the point of your community is Look at behavioral – what are people doing in your community. Dig really deep. It’s really beyond most communities. Have no idea how to prove their value. Figure out the matrix. o Basic rank track stats o Dig into the next piece. What did we want people to do when they were online? Read all the posts Have a tool that pulls it all out for you. Figure out what did they do after that? Look at facilitation – for example, when you were part of a nonprofit and were pulled into doing something you didn’t really want to do. Think like that. This is the key to good community and getting good ROI. If people aren’t coming and posting the right content, then you won’t have any ROI. Moderation – there’s a lot to do to automate. Online communities do a great job of ideation, ask and receiving answers, customer service. Dig into the outcomes of the conversations. Ex. 50 of our largest contributors are leading to % less customer support calls or less calls about basic questions. Perhaps customer support is too vanilla? Senior management must be involved in ROI.
    • Managing the Mob- When Things Go Wrong (1B)Convener: Melissa DanielNotes-taker(s): Valerie KameyaOther Members:Marilyn Jaynes Siko Bouterse Bonnie HoBikramjit Sing Valerie Kameya Dave KimMatt Sharp Lorraine Freeman Kristi HuwerthBrieanne Bogart Christina Lin Carl WatsonMary Walker Adena DeMonte Scott MooreNilofer Merchant Karoli KunsDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Yahoo 360 shutdown. Launched 6 yrs ago; told transitioning 2 yrs ago. coup. long lead time.transitioning to Yahoo Profiles- solution- letting them help design new product. angry. v.positive- preview modules,Why dont you leave it up? Not fixing bugs, so comm satisfaction less.Peanut butter manifesto. Google it (no, yahoo it!)Finding sticky places for customers that they like. Dont find multiple points to fix-make one bigwheel and fix it.360 not part of a unified profile so its being killed. Broken and not fitting it. Migration- blogcontent, comments. Allowed mature content, Yahoo no longer allowing adult content. Peopleleaving for Wordpress where they can talk to about anything. Any Moveable Type contentallowed.Oct. 08 launched Profiles. ask comm. What features do you like? preview contacts beforeaccepting? blogging- added. Other requests not doable or worthwhile. Yahoo large co., takestime.Tell people looking at new product, ask for suggestions (look or dont look at it), then whenrelaunch say "This is what you wanted" Carl WatsonLittle lead time- time to port- feedbacktypical churn rate forChurn rate 5% or less. exit survey. what would have made you stay? I know you can spam meor delete this. People feel their opinion heard.Blog- intensive engagement strategy usu respond 40%- when launching 50-60%?reports back to team, not just lip service.
    • webprofile.blog.comStaff- Y! dark grey background for staff comments so users can scan, see that Y! employeesare responding, its not just users.What do you do when mob is silent? Address ppl individually. keep them safe so ppl hiding willfeel safe when they come out and speak- no dogpile on dissenters, supporters.Melissa- alias to protect her work acctPpl piling on to ppl who say positive things.Quiet ppl will tend to go and post on their blogs, Twitter. Monitor those tooMD doesnt do FB but does twitter, blogsTrack ppl across the network- use answers, blog, stopped using community...Notice whenusage changes, ask them what would bring them back.How leveraging community leaders?Vista client- innovators. early adopter program. Shut down. Comm to Yahoo group that it wasshutting down. Asking ppl who were interested in innovating messenger client. Became thoughtleaders. Help other users- ask Melissa for help rather than customer care- users look smart.Top performers group 40 friends, over 200 messages month. You get a crown Power User. Talkto other power users in group. 90K users. Preview new features. Power users pretty unified inwhat theyre looking for.Yahoo 360: no power user program- a problem.Small group on NDA program 15 users per product. Anyone else can blog or talk about it. Becareful what you say because someone might print it (newspaper).Time mgmt: How much time do you spend managing happy vs. angry users? 70-80% time toboards, emails during a launch. Issues escalated appropriately. Normal time- 30% time10% post 1% post freq 80-90% post infreq. Focus on those getting word out. Dont worry somuch about silent ppl.Tell power users you appreciate them defending your company. Send swag. Do whatever youcan. Post on forum- hey, thanks X user.How do you raise this info to management? Report?MD-weekly post- blog entries, unique users, hot topics, new issues, posts, pulling in criticalprofound or useful comments.Eyelist for every product- weekly distribution, contact me if you have qs.product comm, hybrid comm management roleWork w/PR and Mkting, Customer Care teams. Train agents. Users have suggestions.Rachel McCool- eBay-sentiment barometer. scale 1-10. subjective call on their part. Top levelfor execs. Created expectations for what is normal. Ppl would notice- whats bad this week- and
    • read deeper into report.MD Yahoo uses words- frustrated. #s subjective- Words engage ppl, more broadly understood.Q: How do you separate your feelings about the site from your comm mgr role? A: Sometimesyou agree with user. Let them know youre sympathetic. Mob appreciates it, but higher up execsdont appreciate your not toeing the company line.MD- being neutral is hard. Re-reads emails to make sure emails dont sound terse or bitchy. Iunderstand, this is a great suggestion, Im right on board with you is still fairly neutral vs. Thanksfor the suggestion (flat).Talk to higher ups- youre slightly sympathetic but will agree w/company line.You ARE a user. At some point you become part of the community. Separate out when yourespeaking for yourself vs. community.Conflict can bring in traffic. As long as you can manage the conflict. Ways to fairly present bothsides. Community guidelines everyone is familiar with. Try not to call out specifically what theysaid because they add fuel to the fire. Constructive negativity is OK -MD. Ask them to re-editpost to remove profanity.Communities have diff tolerances about conflict. Some love it; some dont. Who are you losingbecause of the kind of dialogue happening?Has to be some level of conflict or else nothings going on. Southern culture- nice manners, aseemingly pleasant conversation can be tense. Typical NY in your face style- swearing, forgetabout it a few mins later.Screamers- MD will put them on moderation after a warning. Their comments appear in yellow.After a week, they learn.Comments hidden on some sites for certain users- causes weird threaded conversations. Someusers see some, others dont. Adding Viagra or Cialis to comments auto-screened- other userscant see but not deleted.Diff norms for diff comms. All Yahoo comms follow the general guidelines. Groups allowsmature content; profiles and answers dont. Mostly consistent and TOS (terms of service). Brandconsistency? Rules same but the way users are communicated with -Flickr vs Profiles is diff.-developer community. Yahoo voice. speak similarly when product launches.Google - Picasa vs blog forums. Diff personalities of forum and shifts over time. Comm leaderspersonalities trickle down. Try to leave comm alone and only step in to police occasionally.How do users understand the personality of a forum? MD- a Flickr- notice fun tone, short posts,greeting in mult langs vs. Proflies- neutral for users. Blogs- longer posts, instructional, need tounderstand features, product, free speech. Is that culture being reflected back to new users?Groups- yes, Shine-yes. Colors, look and feel diff.Have asked users- look at blog, # of comments- level of user engagement. Color of diffproducts.
    • Scott Moore- when worked for nonprofit, set org principles up front to set expectation. Modifiedover time.Diff to manage entry point. MD worked for Nike community- new users had to watch video aboutLeBron James as part of reg process. But it appealed to their demo and interests.
    • How To Manage Multiple Personalities (1C)Convener: Chip Roberson, ClickMarkets chip@clickmarkets.netNotes-taker(s): Jaysie McLinnOther Members:Jaysie McLinn Alex Parlini, Pew TrustsGam Dias, Overtone Michael Mitchell, IndependentChris Bailey, Gravit8 Marketing Daphne Rocha, Consultant, LiveWorldPaul Ardoin, VisionApp IncSarah Hobbs, Google Patricia Harris-Braun, AARPDelia Santiago, NASA Ames Kaliya Hamlin, Identity WomanMark Dangeard, BlueKiwi Software Sara Leslie, Cisco SystemsJaysie McLinn, Google Chris Bank, EpostmarksRich Reader, WOM-buzzDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Greetings Fellow #OCU2009 Attendees,I have taken the Session Participants sign-in sheet and transcribed it (as best I could)into this spreadsheet. Please check and update your information as appropriate.http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=raY9JGwTzfwooN-nJI9SRBA&inv=ocunotes@gmail.com&t=6547871873470911566&guestIts not an attachment -- its stored online at Google Docs. To open this document, justclick the link above.The notes, nicely taken by Jaysie McLinn, are also available at:http://www.socialtext.net/ocu2009/index.cgi?how_to_manage_multiple_personalities_relationships_onlineAlso see below for notes copied and pasted from the link in case you do not haveaccess to the wiki!I encourage you to review, correct and enhance as you see fit.Finally, I am interested in continuing the discussion we started at the conference. Forstarters I have created a new hashtag, #smpersona, that I would encourage you to usewhen tweeting items of relevance to this topic. Additionally, I am open to other ideashow we can create aspace for dialogue and exchange (e.g. Google Group, Wiki, Ning site, etc.) Id love to
    • hear your thoughts.Thanks again for your participating in this session. I found it stimulating and informative.Chip Roberson, ClickMarketschip@clickmarkets.netWhat are we here? Discussion topics: • How does one interact with all his/her niches without spillover from one creating noise in another? • How can one be authentic online? • Does one merge the personal with the professional or keep them separate?Comments / Questions • Moderation is key. • Balance, how much is too much to share? • Companies create "personalities" to go undercover to get momentum for the company. Is this honorable? • How does this fit with the gaming communitys use of personas? • Be transparant as possible, be open, be engaged - this will strengthen your brand in the long run. • Social fatigue - people may be nervous using technology that appears to be designed by techies for techies; quantify their importance. • Business - foster community - its important to learn how to develop your personality in social media. • Moderation - be honest, never lie, If someone is causing problems, let them know gracefully. • Sharing too much - ex, going on vacation and house gets robbed. Use common sense. If you are not comfortable, dont share. • Boundary - where is that fine line? How much is too much information? (e.g. Facebook friend said something derogatory to a fellow friend can be very challenging). • You have to stay in control of eh product - dont be naive. • Social norms are evolving on the web -- its going to take time. • The Mine Project - you decide where the info goes and who it goes to. http://themineproject.org/ • Community - how do we bring our personality into the community while remaining professional? • Find a balance.Q: How do I monitor all the platforms where Im present?A: http://pipes.yahoo.com might help as it allows one to connect multiple RSS feeds andperform rather complex operations on them
    • Q: How can I keep multiple platforms updated?A: http://Ping.fm provides a single interface from which a person can selectively updatemore than one platform (e.g. Twitter and Facebook) at a time.Key Takeaways from the session • New social norms still evolving in the online space • In order to manage your brand, its important to understand the tools • Personal vs Prefessional, decide if they can be joined or should they remain separate? • Have a plan from the start and know how much you are willing to share and be consistent. • A Generational Shift? - May take time for people to get comfortable with sharing online.New Hashtag for this topic on Twitter: #smpersona
    • Social CRM (1D)Convener: Ajay RamachandranNotes-taker(s): Scott DoddsOther Members:Scott Dodds Natalie LopezJill Finlayson Scott HogrefeLinda Sharp Jeff CamaraDavid Silver Silona BonewaldJohn SummersDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Opportunity & problem: How do we manage customer relationship and the getfragmentedHow do you create a unified framework across these domains- mine the conversations- find and influence the influencers- and how to do that in an authentic and respectful way.Comcast is the leading example, started in a rogue way with the twitter ComcastCares.Just one example, but he raised the bar.One issue that shows, though , is the problems of scale, as the one-to-one interactionsare very resource intensive. One of the benefits of social media is the opportunity toleverage your brand advocates to influence others and gain the network effects. thenthe issue is how to capture the advocates attention span.How does this work in a B2B environment?Getting a snapshot out of what is bubbling up across all networksutilizing social media monitoring to measure activity and buzz and mapping it back tothe profile of that user and report on it.ReframeitMonitor sentiment through comments syndicated out.Tone, sentiment and analysis tools - cant find one that worksWe have budget but we cant show a working model today.The minute something jumps the shark, then the crowd goes and finds another wayCan you keep the conversation going?Keeping the information alive in one place and then starting up new conversations.
    • Mine these conversations to get insights on tone or topicsToday its all manual, you need to automate it and scale.there is an underlying problem - when you are monitoring something, it is not tied toobjectives or business goals.ROI is the underlying tone, but we can prove business impact. Everything funnels into apartner community now that replacesthe tools are not there yet - are you trying to track individuals, or the communicationabout your product. And once you have those things, what can you do with it?There was a report out recently that 80% of social media traffic is unreported. - only80% click the link, the rest is follow on traffic.One of the key values of community is Customer Relationship ManagementBottom lines to two things: revenue and marginWOM and engagement & product improvement: revenue buildingcost savings: self-service, help desk (margin building)What are the key questions and topics we want to address? • WOM advocacy - how to measure it, how do we facilitate that? • Tools for syndicating content • Measurement is a general problem, and how we can measure the business impact and ROI • How can we do this on a one-to-one basis to see how the business is impacting the individual user. • How does market awareness brand affinity affect profit gain? Does that participation translate into improved revenues. • Social identity - people have different identities in different places: who is the consumer, and where are they?What types of technology tools and solutions we are trying to use?You can target users using the knowledge and awareness to action.NetApp:use a business to business site, you must sign up with a real name - no anonymitythe quality of conversation have increased, as the audience ishave had to remove one post in a yearhave 18000 people in the community, 120 sales engineers answering questions - 60%customers & prospects. Anyone can join, but partners can access specific places.Changed partner portal to community.All messaging has to discuss it more link to the community.Content started out mostly employees, now is starting to be created by users - but hedoesnt distinguish between customers and employees - they are all end-users.
    • Product ideas from the community are also being added to the product - showsbusiness impact.Trying to define a customer lifecycle within the community.Have a separate, paid support community that are uploaded into the KB.One problem is conversations are not able to go across different platforms.Using Jive, with multiple instancesNetapp seems to be ahead of the curve in terms of broad-scale engagement with theircustomers, most companies are not engaging at that level.many of Ajays customers have forums, communities, twitter accounts - how do you get a 360 degree view? And how do you understand the individual contacts and mappingthose contacts to your CRM records.Seem to be a the beginning of this in the industry.Social media monitoring solutions like Network Insights that are very targeted, aroundspecific campaigns. The metrics are evolving and going back to the social behavioralmodeling.Other social media monitoring platforms • Relevant noise • Radian 6Problems weve found - a little too fuzzy, give you a general directional signal, and youcan drill down into the post. But they dont do the social graphing.The tools are very poor in identifying a single person across multiple personas, and thecontext of the organization they are participating in.Trying to measure twitter traffic, facebook traffic, and link them back, but to measureacross the different domains.Its hard to tie traffic together across external sources - you know where they are comingfrom, but they dont extend to facebook, etc.One way that social identity is being addressed is via reputation - the data needs to bereciprocated, and they will let you spread the data if they get some value form it (viareputation). Another way is through social equity from your relationships to others.People are willing to give a lot of their data in limited social contexts if they have groupequity.What is the percentage of people who care about privacy of data vs those who dont -hard to measure since the people who care dont respond.
    • Key successes of the Netapp community is the relationships theyve built - putting outmore information can build respect and relationships. Netapp sets the example by beingopen, and they are able to leverage their exisiting reputation.Best strategy is to ask people for their data - "wed like to converse with you onTwitter/Facebook". They then come online and share everything about themselves inexchange for an incentive - to know and hear about the products and some smallamounts of free stuff.free focus groups and product feedbackIdentifying who the influencers areamazing word of mouth marketing through syndicationThose 6000 users areProblem is they may falsify the information to get the gift - the importance is to leveragethe reputation system to prevent that.Is there any interest in allowing community members to share with each other? Theycan if they want.The focus is on the consumers benefit to getting hte information they want, and thebrand monitors the conversation to get the insights - extracting topics from user feedsbased on their conversations to forms a more complete user profile in the CRM aboutwhat tpoics they are interested in.Asking questions in a forums is a demand signal - can identify a prospect in a forum 10-15 weeks before they trigger a demand event on your site or contact your sales team.It takes 18 times to hear the productSwarm marketing - influencing the crowd to move and act together. The intent anddesire starts to turn into action. They socialize together and act to together, and you cancoalesce the intent into and desired action.Seeing in movie we can see how the intent of going to see a movie can turn into boxoffice sales, and we can start to measure that.Surround Marketing: if you know the users identity, you can surround market themthrough multiple channels that is respectful - the right place, channel and time that theywant to engage on.
    • Online Recommendations (1E)Convener: Garett EngleOther Members:Jim Scott Brenna RobertsonCarole McManus Michael RafkoKatherine KornasDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, ifappropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Recommendations strengthen community, improve everythingEgret EndeavorsSimple methodologyImprove recommendations • Accuracy, i.e., make accurate to the individualAmazon suggestions about a group, not customized to YOUNetflix doesnt ask WHY you like a filmContext for recommendations • People like you • Capture more info about YOU • You like A, youre not necessarily going to like B just because a similar group does • Dont ignore the individualCaring.com • Hundreds of thousands of caregiver listingsHow do you get people to rate and comment?This is a community-building problemReputation systems and incentives can help build this type of contentPandora Model • recommendation based on artist • personalized via thumbs up/thumbs downBut if someone doesnt like a song, WHY dont they like it?When are you like the group, when are you not?
    • Toolbox.comHelping people do their job betterFind relevancyIntriguing content vs. actual helpfulnessKnowledge sharePersonalized recommendationSocial circles vs. professional circlesProviding the NEW experience vs. established social networkAttributes-- which pertain to YOUAggregate into a profileRatings from others strengthen attributesWhat is the fall-off rate for clicks?How do you get users to invest their time and give feedbackWhat is the worth of input from people who are constantly recommending things?Who do you trust?Why do you trust them?Attributes of the reviewer
    • Metrics for Measuring Community Health (1F)Convener: Amber Authier, officialCOMMUNITYNotes-taker(s): Charlotte ZiemsDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, ifappropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:We need to define what a healthy community means. This will depend on eachindividual community.The Community Manager defines the type of community (e.g. software developmentcommunity would measure number of downloads, etc… where a musician’s communitymay measure sign in data and mailing list numbers).Unique visitors may be on the rise, but is the unique visitors a real number? Do theyindicate health? Most participants felt that the answer to that question was no.All of us have an intuitive sense of health of a community because we are part of thatfamily. Also a lot of families have rules.Does post frequency = health? What causes post frequency?How to encourage participation? It is based on qualities of community manager.Someone noted that the role of community manager and the role of a community leaderare different. The Community Manager needs to identify the Community Leader.Health = loyalty and usefulness but how do you measure loyalty? Return visits and timespent was the most common.Do Community Managers create community? Measure specific content and posts toassess problems solved.Is counting the number of experts in a community a sign of health? Is expert usefulnessdependant on the number of people listening to or reading that experts’ posts? No – anexpert is an expert regardless of followers.Lithium has issued a free report/white paper called “Community Health Index”. In it theyidentify Growth, Useful Content, Popularity, interactivity, and liveliness as metrics forcommunity health. Metric can change over time but Lithium normalized the info overtime. A “Kudos” rating system was developed. More information can be found withLithium. How to measure “useful content”? Ratings – Positive only = kudos. Users gainreputation so weight of kudos from lots of reps is larger. Why only kudos? A la Digg. Itprevents the gaming of the system. Inferred stuff going wrong. Tagging also enters intoit. 99% of content comes from 10% of users.
    • Lots of metrics aggregated together = health. Get Satisfaction has a Satisfactionometer,which allows users to measure kudos more gradually. Surface best answers to top.Lithium= kudos.Question: If a new user gets a bad rating, do they post again or does it limit growth?That is why Lithium does kudos only. But no rating = a bad rating. Users getting badrating is a moderation problem. Work with users to understand why their posts don’t getkudos.Small community may be valuable to members even though it isn’t big. How to definehealth when not every member contributes or when community isn’t huge. Sometimesgrowth of community ruins health of that community.Twitter is great tool to moderate community and connect with members.How do people measure Twitter? # of followers. Twitterizer. # of retweets. Gettingsentiment across tweets too. Retweets of good tweets and retweets of bad tweets.Communities – what is their value in contributing the business as a whole. Measure thatwith affinity.How do we explain to clients the value of the online world to the offline world?Sentiment. Through research. Through social media monitoring.A human is needed to interpret metrics. Statistics need to be considered with humanjudgment.Some communities are small and don’t have the resources to do sophisticated researchto measure health.Social capital vs. intellectual capital. Health = success? What’s unhealthy? Norm-busting behavior. Crucial Conversation was recommended as a book worth reading. Itcovers how to bring up taboo subjects.Patterns of behavior indicating “unhealthy” are predictable in their path they take sotheir path can be shifted or influenced. Healthy communities need guidelines that need to be defined and enforced. Enforcingguidelines is key – you have to do it consistently and fairly. No cops in every corner.Pre-establishing guidelines and culture influences the health of the community. Affinitysuper hard to measure – requires natural lay-processing.Health is based on community purposes. If your community has no purpose,there is no concern of health.
    • Can’t you just ask the community if they think the community is healthful? It does work.NPS = Net Promoter Score = Sentiment. Some got great results from this tactic. Forsome communities this is helpful and for others it may not be.Is the community part of a healthy ecosystem = pro creation/growthA metaphor of “automated health care” was mentioned. You want to talk with yourdoctorWhy don’t you just ask them – iPerceptions.com has a free tool for asking them.Tying goals of community back to the goals of the business. 3 factors to measure = 1)traffic (data) 2) behaviors (management/downloads/posts/etc…) and 3) ValueProposition (weather your stats are increasing or decreasingValue has to tie back to a tangible business goal to get executive buy-in.Attributes of healthy community = good communication, dialog, good information,respect, participation, ideas, interest, engagement, diversity, inclusive (these were theattributes of what the discussion attendees indicated was the measure of the success ofour session).What tools are people using? Google Analytics (you are on your own to interpret andset up), Omniture (pre-established relationship, assistance with set up)Vendor platforms are fine, but reporting sucks. Jive, Teligent, etc... It is still a manualprocess.
    • How to Nurture a Thriving Open Source Community in aCommercial Open Source Context (1G)Convener: Peter TheonyOther Members:Nick Pollitt Stefano MaffulliKaren McAdams Frankie CallahanJack Herrick Terri PelusoDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:
    • Metrics for Measuring Community Health (1H)Convener: Amber AuthierNote Taker: Charlotte ZiemsOther Members:Arielle Hoffman Keith Savageau Kevin BurnsMyrna Rivera Shana Brennan Jorge DorantesDana Nourie Becky Herndon Raul WescottDaniel Ciomek Jennifer Graziami Melyssa NelsonDebbie Austin Navneet Grewal Estee Solomon GrayRobin Bertelsen Krs Freeman Thomas KnollAmber Authier Kirby Freeman Jessica MargolinGuy Martin Jeff Patrick Michael SharmaRon Liechty Hiren Patel Carole LinJay MacIntosh Amy Muller Marcos PolancoJohn Todor Jordan WilliamsChas Warner Mike RowlandDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Defining health of community depends on type of community. • Community manager defines type of community (eg software dev measures = # of downloads) • Musician community- sign in data and list members • Unique visitors are on the rise • Are unique visitors a real number? • Do they indicate health? NOAll of us have an intuitive sense of “health” of community because we’re all part of afamily. • In families there are rulesPost frequency = health. • What causes post frequency? • How to encourage participation? • Qualities of community leader? • Role of community manager is not same as role of community leader o Manager has to identify leaderHealth= loyalty and usefulness • How to measure loyalty?
    • o Return visits o Time spentDo communities create community? • Measure specific content and posts to assess problems solved.Community’s number of experts is a sign of health • Is expert usefulness dependent on the number of people listening to or reading that experts’ posts? o NO- an expert is an expert regardless of followers?Lithium- report on “Community Health Index” • Growth, useful content, popularity, interactivity, and liveliness • Free report – metrics can change over time but Lithium normalized the information over time. • “Kudos” rating system • Lithium community has more info • Q: New user gets a bad rating- do they post again and does it limit growth? o A: that’s why only kudos are used • Q: But no rating = bad rating o Users getting bad rating is a moderation problem. Work with users to understand why their posts don’t get kudosHow to measure “useful content”? • Ratings: positive only= kudos • Users gain reputation so weight of kudos from lots of reps is larger • Why only kudos? o Prevents gaining of system o Inferred stuff going wrong o Tagging also enters into it o 99% of content comes from 10% of users • Lots of metrics aggregated together = health • GetSatisfaction has “Satisfactionmeter” • Allows users to measure kudos more granularly, surfaces best answers to the topSmall communities are valuable to their members. Even though its not big. How todefine health when not every member contributes or when community is not huge.Sometimes growth of community ruins health of the community.Twitter is a great tool to moderate community and content with members.How to measure Twitter?:# of followers; Twitteralizer; # of return tweets- on both good and bad tweets; Gettingsentiment across
    • Communities their value contributing to business? Measure that with affinity.How to explain to clients the value of the online world to the offline world. Sentiment.Brand. Research social media monitoring.Need a human to interpret metrics. Statistics need to be combined with humanjudgment.Some communities are small and don’t have the resources to measure.Social capital vs. intellectual capital. Health success? Whats unhealthy? Norm-busting behavior, CrucialConversations if you’re never heard about. How to bring up taboo subjects?Patterns of behavior indicating “unhealthy”. Predictable in the path they take so theirpath can be shifted.Community guidelines need to be defined and enforced.Enforcing guidelines is key- have to do it consistently and fairly and make it distributed.No cops in every corner.Pre-establishing culture influences health of community. Affinity super hard to measure-requires natural processing.Health is based on community’s purpose. No purpose = no concern about health.Cant you just ask the community if they think the community is healthful? IT DOESWORK.NPS = net promotor score. Sentiment.Person @ Sun asked community and got great results.For some that’s helpful, for other’s its not.Part of healthy ecosystem = procreation/growth.Metaphor of “automated health care”. You want to talk to your doctor.Why don’t you just ask them- iPerceptions.com has a free tool for asking them.Tying goals of community back to goals of business- 3 factors1. traffic (data)2. behaviors (downloads, posts, etc.)3. value proposition
    • Value has to be back to a tangible business goalAttributes of a healthy community:good info, respect, participant ideas, interest, engagement, diversity, inclusivenessWhat tool or SW are people using? • Google analytics- you’re on your own • Omniture – pre-established relationship • Vendor platform data is fine but reporting sucks!
    • Using Other Social Media Networks to Build Your Community(1I)Convener: Janet FoutsNotes-taker(s): Megan KeaneOther Members:Robb Miller Bill Jacobson Andrew BishopGail Ann Williams Nathan Gwilliam Randy PaynterHeather Rodde Thomas Miner Lynne SteffinsMegan Keane Buddy Teaster Tom NickelSusan Tenby Will Bunker Brian SullicanHeather Wong Rachel Weidinger Shara KarasicJenee Cline J.J. Toothman Molly RobinsonChris Wolz Mike Rosenthal Cynthia SchroederZoya Fallah Lauren Klein Rachel MakoolHal Bryan Cindy Starks Jennifer KeeverTerry Nagel Christine Sarkis Janice Linden- ReedLuchen Foster Tim Knight Angie RyanRay Eisenberg Jun Shim Tom HumbargerDenise Kalos Debbi DembeckiHeather Forsythe Mary SongDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: • GroupLeaf place to aggregate social media identities of your users together • SocialMention (free), Trackr (free), many paid tracking tools (Radiant6 is one) • A lot of tracking is scrappy • Can use analytics to track where traffic coming from on your social network. Then can do campaign targetting specific social media network & look at results • Get community involved where they live already • Content created on site automatically can update Twitter, Facebook, etc.--bring traffic back in, incentive is one place to go to write that goes out to many channels • Strategy of having tools in one place to push info. out • Every single social network and community has own culture: each have own language & way of speaking, have to tailor message to culture • Dont choose the network first: Understand your audience: segment your audience to figure out who your market is, who you want to connect o, what their behavior on other sites is to get most bang from your effort • Key of Twitter/spread/viral marketing is getting connected to a few key people with large networks, target folks who are interested in what youre interested in, reach out to them
    • • When you go to funder, your Twitter influence score matters; something to think about for nonprofits looking for funding.• Many Twitter ranking tools available to find influential users• Support team at Comcast an example of customer service on Twitter. One individual face w/ team behind it• Southwest another good example of corporation effectively using Twitter, as our JetBlue, Zappos• Some pizza places used by abolishing phone orders in favor of tweeting orders in, give out free coupons• charitywater.org fantastic example of nonprofit using social media in smart ways• Big brands traditionally more support in community• How are you managing all these channels with not a lot of people? Find tools that do double-duty: Ping.fm (selective updating any/all of different social networks), Seesmic, Twirhl good for managing mutliple accounts. Mobile tools: Tweetie,Twitterfon, TweetStack mobile tools• How do you get conversations on social networks aggregated back to your site?• If your conversation is interesting enough, they will go to where it is. You may catch them one site and lead them to your site• Incentivize users can be low-level, give em a t-shirt• Transactional questions in a forum• Easy to forget that some people are allergic to certain kinds of communication: have options for them to participate in the medium they like, be it forums, paper mail, Facebook, etc.• Strategy matters--where do you want your community to live? What do you want to accomplish? and drive the users to where you can achieve your objectives• Ideally you would use both own communtiy & other social platforms• Huge difference between collecting user info. & putting in a database vs having them opt-in• Hopefully reason behind the group isnt to get lead, but instead about the subject matter & community• Any stats on likelihood of joining community of having FB connect vs not? Nice to have convenience of easily clicking into FB. BUT dont necessarily want to share all your community interactions w/ Facebook, most people have many facets of their lives dont necessarily want to share everything cross-platform• Methods for finding discussions? Keyword searches on Google, SocialMention, etc. and get alerts• YouTube success also with tutorials, training videos, etc.• Many marketing YouTube contests w/ mixed success• Small prizes (<$1000) work well• Key is videos dont go away, they are still there builiding traffic• Finding the people who are passionate & give them tools to evangelize behind your cause/campaign/brand• Choose your topic carefully b/c you cant control what they are going to say• Social media great way to re-purpose content for free• Reaching out to content creators to feature their content
    • • Importance of aggregation to be able to put it all in one place; users will want to go to one place for all the best stuff• When you support thought leaders on other networks, they will return the favor in ways you cant imagine
    • Recovery.Gov – Myth or reality (1J)Convener: Claude WhitmyerNotes-taker(s): Claude WhitmyerOther Members:Angela Hey Rajesh PandeyFrancine Hardaway Claude WhitmyerDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Recover.Gov - Reality or Myth?Conclusion: No real community on Recovery.Gov. No dialog. Needs a communitymanager and community software.Reference: This book is a good place to look for a detailed break down of what’sactually going on: Guide To The Stimulus Packages The Definitive Defense Reference.(available on Amazon).The recovery act mandates infrastructure for telecommunications (to finish providingaccess to the Internet for those segments of society that dont currently have it and tohelp schools get wired or upgrade their existing telecommuniationsinfrastructure/Internet access).Convener: Claude Whitmyer, Attendees: Angela Hey, Francine Hardaway, RajeshPandey1. Small businessesinterested in getting funding to create a for-profit company working in the onlinecommunity sector.The Recovery Act is more setup toward vertical segments than small businesses ingeneral.For small business the most important thing is the changes in SBA Loans.*Waivering of fees*Lowering of interest rate*Increasing the guarantee/lowering the collateral*Software = qualifies as a manufactured productReality, its now easier to qualify for an SBA loan, but there are very few "premier SBAlenders," those banks officially allowed to submit the loans. So it is NOT easy to get theloan, though it is possible.
    • Patriots express loans for Vets is the easiest small business loans to get. You canapply directly on SBA.Gov for up to $35,000.The nature of the funding makes it possible to get the software, website development,and training included in the project.2. Telecommunications infrastructure:USDA RUS grants to wire economically depressed rural areas and tie indian reservationsites together."Wiring" is mandated. Video and web conferencing, software/hardware, training to use.Proposal to include creation of and training for learning communities using all thisinfrastructure, make sense. Partnering with local business, local government, indianagencies, ad local colleges seems like a good strategy.3. Telemedicine/Health Records Infrastructure:Again, large amount mandated.*Money for health IT for small providers to move to electronic health records.*Money to get certified by CCIT which is the board to certify what can be used for healthrecords.4. There is green weatherization money.But this probably only releated to green businesses or non=profits who happen to alsowant to build online community. The nature of the funding makes it possible to get thesoftware, website development, and training included in the project.Most money goes to various agencies. From federal governement to state agencies tolocal agencies.Most of the money is goiong to large corporations with established relationships withgovernment agencies.right now recovery.gove is only reporting what has been awarded. Very little isannounced with enough of alead time to submit an application by the deadline5. Higher EdCapital improvements is the easiest way to get a share. One advantage of universitiesis that they can come up with large, "shovel-ready"Conclusion: No real community on Recovery.Gov. No dialog. Needs a communitymanager and community software.Next Steps: Write/blog about the inequities of this system and the neglect of the small(less than 100 employees) business which actually creates more than half of all jobsand numbers as many as 21 million companies. There should be more support for this
    • size business since it has an even greater actual impact on the economy than theFortune blah blah. AND…these businesses are both cheaper to bail out and easier tomake successful.
    • Social Media Virgins (1J)Convener: Claude WhitmyerNotes-taker(s): Claude WhitmyerDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, ifappropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Who do I need a community?Customers are 3X more likely to buy when engaged in communityHow do I engage people without them feeling marketed to?Next step tie on line communities back to traditional social interaction
    • Open Space Second Session Topics
    • The Trainwreck that is the Distributed Conversation (2A)Convener: J.J. ToothmanNotes-taker(s): Delia SantiagoOther Members:JJ Toothman (host, @jjtoothman) Maryam WebsterDave Peck Eric SueszDelia Santiago Amy MullerTom Humbarger Jill FinlaysonKaroli Kuns Scott DoddsMarc Dangeard Debbie DembeckiScott Hogrefe Janice Linden-ReedFrancine Hardaway Chas WarnerDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: • Conversation is happening all around the place about. • Someone might blog, tweet about it, feeds to Facebook. People might reply in all of those places. o What techniques/ practices do people have to deal with that to have singular healthy conversation? o Is that necessary? o Does this distributed conversation make community weaker or stronger? • Prob: Someone might only go to one place and think there isn’t a conversation. Also, it makes things hard to track. A good discussion might take place but only fraction of folks are contributing to. • Can be okay having them distinct, but want way to aggregate for archival purposes. So for example, so you know where the conversations were. 1) discovering it 2) archiving it. • Is this solved by a missing widget for Wordpress. Tumblr. All Top dashboard. • Desire to have it feed into somewhere so you can see who’s seeing what instead of checking everything. • Cross posting link vs. cross posting the content…. • Also issue of OTHERS reposting your content. “Cut and Paste” • So various paradigms include: o Posting same content multiple places o Quoting and reposting (cut and paste) o Post one place and push out links to multiple places. • Upside to distributed conversation: A positive, particularly if there are links back to each other.
    • • Do you want to close the loop at some point? Don’t HAVE to, but there can be a benefit to it. • Is this a missing visualization tool… or more? • Conversation prism. Trackback. Track on Twitter. Bit.ly. • What do folks do to track their content: o Track o Bit.ly o Technorati o Many others… • Connect connect in first place via Yahoo Pipes, Tarpipe. • So: Tools for monitoring, aggregating this is not necessarily there (yet). • Could have conversation all stream/ feed back to the original posting. • Reframe It as another tool—offers more control. But also adds another layer of content, too. • Temporal component, too. 1) how real time show, distributed across networks 2) how tally the impact. Twitter isn’t as easy to search as far back as a blog post. • Folks want this information come/ sent TO them. • “Our messages are traveling faster than we can follow them; that’s necessarily a horrible thing”. • Silo’d communities vs. one unified community. • How do you know if people “care”? • Do the members want to engage with other groups? • Layer of abstraction: persistent identifiers. • Twitter and FB has democratized the conversation. Can follow lots of people at once on Twitter. One to many component of the conversation. • Discussion of Google Wave; have integrated conversations from it, among many other useful features. What standards apps are being written on. • Does distributed conversation strengthen or weaken to community? o Strengthen, but want to monitor it all. o Who is talking about our stuff (as a brand)? o Where can I go to participate? • Complete Web Monitoring by Sean Power • LeedLanderKey question: o How do we facilitate it (the conversation)?Takeaways • We needs better tools to track conversation, linkback. Visualization tool. • You can’t control it. • How can you get users to link content/ conversation back to you? If it’s so easy to distribute content, make it as easy to aggregate the conversation. • Be aware if you’re using the correct network. • Distributed conversation—Do Not Ruin It! This is okay!!
    • Strategy and Communities (2B)Convener: Nolifer MerchantNotes-taker(s): Valerie KameyaOther Members:John Todor Jordan WilliamsMike Sitrin Nikki PavaKrys Franklin Alexa BruceDenise Kalos Valerie KameyaNavneet Grewal Perrine CramptonRay Eisenberg Denise Kalos-BrevidaMary WalkerDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, ifappropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:AOL- Online corporate learning. Taught Web 2.0 tech. Recognized contributers. V.successful. Wrap learning into process so ppl dont go back to habits.Citibank- learning lab.Net app- using external network internally. Move away from distrib lists. No centralresources. Participants can search for info.Emails sent- lost info, cant search others email historically like a forum can.Intranet vs. online community. Intranet- login annoyance.Autodesk- 90% intranet info into sharepoint site. Lessons learned- moved intranet overwith same structure.Success factors workshop- Ppl moving to community from intranet (static). How to applycommunity activities in process. Encourage conversation- brings health to org.REI- Sharepoint- a repository, not a community. Self-selecting- online community fansparticipate. REI for good. Great place to work -Forbes. Yammer- connect around atradeshow. Long tenure workers- reluctance to change. How do you merge oldemail/meeting ppl w/ newer workers more comfortable with it?Sugg: Model the new behavior1-9-90 1 drive , 9 helping, 90 coming along for rideSomething has no value to you because its not you.What can we achieve using social media vs. non sm?
    • -Meetings- tough questions in social media enables employees to ask qs notcomfortable asking in public. everyone cloaked in meeting- safe. collaboration safer.can tell someone five levels up that they dont think their idea is good.AOL- differential levels of buy-in. Denise- Prob w/anonymity. Can communicatew/comm manager about problems and would be answered. Answered in forum so noone singled out. New form of submitting qs on index cards (ppl put qs and names oncards).Prob w/anonymity- 360 review- ppl attack anonymously because they feel protected.Denise feels we need to own our voices- be responsible, considerate.Pros- temporary anonymity- personas. Ongoing identity. Studies- we cant stopourselves from judging ideas based on who we think its coming from. Not listening to 12year old kid, not your demo, not listening. Bob always says that, you stop listening toBob.The strategy/decision making process is a social decision.REI- headquartered in 1 place, locations in many places (85% of customer interactionsoccur here). Good to know if input coming from hourly employee vs manager.Yammer- great way to get ppl engaged in community around a tradeshow. Could befun, a contest. Embed a behavior. Yammer feels friendly, has pic next to it vs. email-very formal- form, white space. Creating open environment.Sustainable Design conference. Frog Design. Write down what your brand is on a pieceof paper. How you want your brand to be seen. Facilitates collab learning in old schoolmethod.Fan of social media but very suspect of it. tweet- social media more about them thanyou. how much of it are problems that wouldnt exist if you sat down and talked to them?Or social media gives us tools to do what we want to do- collaborate. Interact more asequals.Way to build cool things. Community has to happen in person. We are all ppl. Tappinginto what we want as ppl-shake hands, put face with name, feel the persons warmth.Stay connected as ppl.One POV- we dont want to collaborate b/c we dont want things to move slower.Understand theoretically that collab gives buy-in.Strategy- comm decision making body? Prob bad strategy. Or to connect w/whatsgoing on in org?
    • Set clear expectation. Authority, delegation, etc. Dont want to set expectation oflistening to ppl and acting on it. Arg made in Wisdom of the Crowds book- comm madeof diverse indiv w/diff level of knowledge- aggregated decision could be better thansmall group of experts. More buy-in.Comm decision making diff process than exec decision making. Dont combine both-makes it slower. Culture- ppl feel safer when anonymous- is the prob collab decisionmaking or the problem of an unsafe corp culture?Maybe not either/or -spectrum. 100% hierarchical today...decide move to 70%. 10 yrs.ago product innovation 3 yrs. apart- now 6 months apart for cell phones. 50%collab/50% hierarchical? Need for speed.HP- 50% more ideas from other areas of company than from trad R&D dept. We is Mebook example- how do you ascribe acctability to anyone? profits eventually donated tocharity.Someone needs to be responsible in the end.Idea generation. Leader of division- explore it. Then give smaller decision to community-do you like blue or red?Netapps- contest- ideas for apps. 19 workable ideas; 1 in dev. Beta tester group fromcomm.How do you have people shape what the problem is?Comm platforms forcing honesty. Stating the problem- no way to deny if a bunch ofpeople are saying thats the problem.Do you have to ask what the problem is vs. scanning through vibrant communitys poststo derive problem? Q: how many resources do you have to put against it?NLP -Programming to pull tone, comments, buzz in community. Creating dashboards.System in large company- rollout. Upper people bought in, lower level people didnt useit, said they werent talking the same language.Linda- you need to talk to customer and read the comments. Its fine for computer tosegment, but person needs to ask the right questions and listen to answers.Voice of the employee project- company changed strategy from lean and mean. gaveemployees open ended questions. promised confidentiality.Asking questions is traditional. Create conversations around it.
    • Bottoms up approach conversations. Let exec get into the club.Get participants into the club- use multidimensional tagging system. Flippers of interestto some REI stores, not others.Ratings.How to frame and package info so execs can hear. Overwhelmed w/data.Challenge of comm- high volume. Mgrs used to it- execs overwhelmed. Pics? Graphs?How can communities play a part in strategy? not strategy in community. How cancommunity help you achieve your strategy?Execs not distributing info they have; which creates less buy-in for lower ppl.Hierarchical doesnt lend itself to uncontrived conversations. Execs have to speak theirlanguage. Lower level ppl -no workforce training, just bots, cog in and cog out.Is online and social media a tool or a paradigm shift?This is a new way to market. This is a collab tool. How do ppl do online communityalong with their reg job? Wrong question- this is their reg job.How do we monetize this? Dont think its about monetization. Employee engagement-participating in diff way. Talent segmentation. Whos engaged? Whos not? Are theypivotal and critical? Everyone participates in diff ways. Understand where they sit andhow they play. Und how they participate in their diff roles.Social media- vehicle for change- new org. Push-back- give it to me the way I want it.Citibank- put into situation- have to figure out strategy in a few hours. How are yougoing to survive in new environment? John Chambers- Cisco video.Top- bottom- nothing in the middleFocus on strategy and process, not the vehicle or tools. Can you drive comm through atool? sharepoint, twitter.
    • Using Strategy and Communities (2C)Convener: Nilofer MerchantNotes-taker(s): Valerie KameyaOther Members:John Todor Mary WalkerMike Sitrin Jordan WilliamsKrys Franklin Nikki PavaDenise Kalos Alexa BruceNavneet Grewal Valerie KameyaRay Eisenberg Perrine CramptonDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Denise Kalos-BrevidaAOL- Online corporate learning. Taught Web 2.0 tech. Recognized contributers. V.successful. Wrap learning into process so ppl dont go back to habits.Citibank- learning lab.Net app- using external network internally. Move away from distrib lists. No centralresources. Participants can search for info.Emails sent- lost info, cant search others email historically like a forum can.Intranet vs. online community. Intranet- login annoyance.Autodesk- 90% intranet info into sharepoint site. Lessons learned- moved intranet overwith same structure.Success factors workshop- Ppl moving to community from intranet (static). How to applycommunity activities in process. Encourage conversation- brings health to org.REI- Sharepoint- a repository, not a community. Self-selecting- online community fansparticipate. REI for good. Great place to work -Forbes. Yammer- connect around atradeshow. Long tenure workers- reluctance to change. How do you merge oldemail/meeting ppl w/ newer workers more comfortable with it?Sugg: Model the new behavior1-9-90 1 drive , 9 helping, 90 coming along for rideSomething has no value to you because its not you.
    • What can we achieve using social media vs. non sm?-Meetings- tough questions in social media enables employees to ask qs notcomfortable asking in public. everyone cloaked in meeting- safe. collaboration safer.can tell someone five levels up that they dont think their idea is good.AOL- differential levels of buy-in. Denise- Prob w/anonymity. Can communicatew/comm manager about problems and would be answered. Answered in forum so noone singled out. New form of submitting qs on index cards (ppl put qs and names oncards).Prob w/anonymity- 360 review- ppl attack anonymously because they feel protected.Denise feels we need to own our voices- be responsible, considerate.Pros- temporary anonymity- personas. Ongoing identity. Studies- we cant stopourselves from judging ideas based on who we think its coming from. Not listening to 12year old kid, not your demo, not listening. Bob always says that, you stop listening toBob.The strategy/decision making process is a social decision.REI- headquartered in 1 place, locations in many places (85% of customer interactionsoccur here). Good to know if input coming from hourly employee vs manager.Yammer- great way to get ppl engaged in community around a tradeshow. Could befun, a contest. Embed a behavior. Yammer feels friendly, has pic next to it vs. email-very formal- form, white space. Creating open environment.Sustainable Design conference. Frog Design. Write down what your brand is on a pieceof paper. How you want your brand to be seen. Facilitates collab learning in old schoolmethod.Fan of social media but very suspect of it. tweet- social media more about them thanyou. how much of it are problems that wouldnt exist if you sat down and talked to them?Or social media gives us tools to do what we want to do- collaborate. Interact more asequals.Way to build cool things. Community has to happen in person. We are all ppl. Tappinginto what we want as ppl-shake hands, put face with name, feel the persons warmth.Stay connected as ppl.One POV- we dont want to collaborate b/c we dont want things to move slower.Understand theoretically that collab gives buy-in.Strategy- comm decision making body? Prob bad strategy. Or to connect w/whatsgoing on in org?
    • Set clear expectation. Authority, delegation, etc. Dont want to set expectation oflistening to ppl and acting on it. Arg made in Wisdom of the Crowds book- comm madeof diverse indiv w/diff level of knowledge- aggregated decision could be better thansmall group of experts. More buy-in.Comm decision making diff process than exec decision making. Dont combine both-makes it slower. Culture- ppl feel safer when anonymous- is the prob collab decisionmaking or the problem of an unsafe corp culture?Maybe not either/or -spectrum. 100% hierarchical today...decide move to 70%. 10 yrs.ago product innovation 3 yrs. apart- now 6 months apart for cell phones. 50%collab/50% hierarchical? Need for speed.HP- 50% more ideas from other areas of company than from trad R&D dept. We is Mebook example- how do you ascribe acctability to anyone? profits eventually donated tocharity.Someone needs to be responsible in the end.Idea generation. Leader of division- explore it. Then give smaller decision to community-do you like blue or red?Netapps- contest- ideas for apps. 19 workable ideas; 1 in dev. Beta tester group fromcomm.How do you have people shape what the problem is?Comm platforms forcing honesty. Stating the problem- no way to deny if a bunch ofpeople are saying thats the problem.Do you have to ask what the problem is vs. scanning through vibrant communitys poststo derive problem? Q: how many resources do you have to put against it?NLP -Programming to pull tone, comments, buzz in community. Creating dashboards.System in large company- rollout. Upper people bought in, lower level people didnt useit, said they werent talking the same language.Linda- you need to talk to customer and read the comments. Its fine for computer tosegment, but person needs to ask the right questions and listen to answers.Voice of the employee project- company changed strategy from lean and mean. gaveemployees open ended questions. promised confidentiality.Asking questions is traditional. Create conversations around it.
    • Bottoms up approach conversations. Let exec get into the club.Get participants into the club- use multidimensional tagging system. Flippers of interestto some REI stores, not others.Ratings.How to frame and package info so execs can hear. Overwhelmed w/data.Challenge of comm- high volume. Mgrs used to it- execs overwhelmed. Pics? Graphs?How can communities play a part in strategy? not strategy in community. How cancommunity help you achieve your strategy?Execs not distributing info they have; which creates less buy-in for lower ppl.Hierarchical doesnt lend itself to uncontrived conversations. Execs have to speak theirlanguage. Lower level ppl -no workforce training, just bots, cog in and cog out.Is online and social media a tool or a paradigm shift?This is a new way to market. This is a collab tool. How do ppl do online communityalong with their reg job? Wrong question- this is their reg job.How do we monetize this? Dont think its about monetization. Employee engagement-participating in diff way. Talent segmentation. Whos engaged? Whos not? Are theypivotal and critical? Everyone participates in diff ways. Understand where they sit andhow they play. Und how they participate in their diff roles.Social media- vehicle for change- new org. Push-back- give it to me the way I want it.Citibank- put into situation- have to figure out strategy in a few hours. How are yougoing to survive in new environment? John Chambers- Cisco video.Top- bottom- nothing in the middleFocus on strategy and process, not the vehicle or tools. Can you drive comm through atool? sharepoint, twitter.
    • Online Publications Community Efforst: What’s Wrong,What’s Not, What’s Next- Online Publications and Sites ofPrint Publication (2D)Convener: Christine SarkisNotes-taker(s): Robin BertelsenOther Members:Jennifer Keever Mina EngJeff Eddings Adena DeMonteAlex Parlini Jen NestelAngela Hey Rachel RomeroRay Eisenberg Nicole PoindexterBetsy BurroughsDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Questions we all have:Moving beyond PDFsMaking content more interactiveHow do you engage the email list and get them into the forumsHow do you build a community around local news?Repurpose commentSyndicating content/broaden visibility • Fold participation into the email w/ social sharing. Social Media Insider andBudget Travel newsletters are good examples. • try polls and other hooks to get people to jump in. Ask very specific questions toget the conversation going. • Compelling content is required! • Empower your users to do the sharing for you: ShareMe tool barAtomize and distribute - whats the value of your own website? But people need ananchoring point and thats the value of the primary website.Develop relationships to other bloggers. Have then write for you and offer to writesomething for them and reciprocal links.Upper management by off on community and fear of commentsSet clear community guidelines, the brands should listen to the feedback, let peoplegive their own ranks and share, Time magazine lists as an example. They used thegoogle friend connect api. And then they made a re-ranking list app.
    • Side issue: there are too many communities to join! Google friend connect agrees withyou! This can help publications fold in people quickly.What features do people have and want?Better social sharing tools so you dont overwhelm some of the people you interact with.Multiple identities to help manage the streams.People are not using the share tools enough. Static.com which allows user to broadcastcontent to multiple sites: FB, Twitter and MS. This is for both the editor in the CMS andreaders.Where is email useful?When you know a specific person to have the info, rather than share w/ your circle offriends. Have the emails include links to comments.NewspapersThe NYT is not interested in ending their pieces with calls to action to the community toget engagement. But local papers need to do this.Underlying motivationsWhy are you doing what youre doing? You broadcast because you want to beassociated with the content.PollsGive a very low barrier to entry and help bring people into engagement.User Generated Content UsesUser generated comments can be used to target the editorial and the advertising. Bettertargeted ads deliver a better user experience.Do 5-part articles to bring people back on a daily basis.Check lists are popular - and ask users what else should be on the list.Marketing engines run on contribution and recognition - make a hall of fame wallRepurpose contentUse member comments into "new" articles or as a weekly roundup.Use reader-generated content to start a whole new piece.Distinguishing user generated contentUse design, WWE handles this well.PDFsAnyone have any suggestions on how to deal with security, design and other issues - toimprove the experience w/ the same features? Try talking to Adobe.
    • How Does Online Community Help Local BusinessesGenerate Traffic (2E)Convener: Buddy TeasterNotes-taker(s): Carole McManusOther Members:Michael Rowland, Impact Interactions Claude Whitmeyer, FutureUMichael Mitchell, User Experience Shara Karasic, Business.comConsultant Jim Weldon, SourceNLynne Steffens, The GrouperyDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Key Understandings/Observations • Many biz owners say "I dont use (social media) tools, so Im not interested" but their customers DO, so they MUST • Were seeing more and more anecdotal evidence of how Twitter is creating successful word-of-mouth marketing campaigns • Twitter hashtags and tagging helping to build brands • Small business owners need constant contact with their customers. Email marketing doesnt cut it. Twitter and Facebook are cost-effective. • ReachLocal.com is using their platform to convert former Yellow Pages customers • Publicity around social media tools can create publicity around the business (e.g., a story about L.A.s Korean Taco truck is about Twitter, but it benefits the business, too) • Local businesses are in an excellent position to take advantage of local events, school projects, sporting events to market their biz • Hiring college interns and retirees is cost-effective way to run social media marketing campaignsSession NotesImpactsocialmedia.com Small business consulting for local businesses looking to useTwitter, Facebook, etc. and build their online reputation. Also performs competitiveanalysis of local competitors and will execute strategy (tweets, updates, work with criticson third party sites, etc.)Work with local search/partner/co-branded marketingTagging, hashtags on Twitter to help people find themSEO- keywords?
    • Build presence on social networks, AdSense, etc.Help biz build a following-- 6 month contract ensures the biz is getting the hange of itThey monitor social network sitesSmall local biz: help them build online reputationWhat do small businesses do onlineHyper-local communities in the best position to reach out to enthusiastic customers. Bizowner knows their habits (Hot Dog vendor knows what time/day his customers eat lunchthere), local biz can cater to school projects, local sports teams, etc.Twitter success storiesHow do you sell to small businesses?Reach out to local businessesGet them to invest in branding, reputation, couponsGroupery.com using volunteer workforce of parent fundraisers • parents know local merchants • many merchants say coupons not working for them • Repeat exposure thru social media is valuableGroupery outreach • Biz creates profile/billboard -- ads featured on targeted emails • Built into platform • CustomizableSmall businesses need to build awareness • need constant contact with their customers without emailReachLocal are converting Yellow Pages customerscreate pg with phone/email of bizDrive SEM internallyScaling Social Media presence • use interns/college journalism students • use retirees- AARP programs • Recruit volunteer experts in exchange or free products/svs or small stipendMany biz owners say "I dont use these tools, so Im not interested" but their customersDO, so they MUST
    • Publicity around the tools creates publicity for the biz • Twitter in the media • Facebook trickling up from their kidsChamber of Commerce still the rallying point for community businesses
    • Generals, Colonels and Community (2F)Convener: Guy MartinDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, ifappropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Community building is a “contact sport”How do you balance the “carrot” and the “stick”Get community to meet spirit of the law, not just letterFAQ’s are criticalNeed human take on metrics
    • Social Media Monitoring (2G)Convener: Jim CashelNotes-taker(s): Tezza YuijuicoOther Members:Heather Forsythe Patricia Harris- BrownStephano Raffulli Jeff PatrickDavid Kim Chris KentonMatt Sharp Chip RobersonBrieanne Bogart John YamasakiTezza Yujuico John SummersGloria Young Natalie LopezTim Knight Thomas KnollMichael Sharma Sarah HobbsCharlotte Ziems John MooreDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, ifappropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: What are the questions around Social Media Monitoring? What toools are available? What’s are the different solutions out there? Light/Med// Heavy *5-8% of high colume tweets are high reach/high-influence/high-priority that should be addressed directly. How important is it to be everywhere at the same time? Depends on the objectives of the campaign. Who matters? Who in large organizations owns the social media? - tension between marketing and customer service? - Zappo’s – it’s an organizational culture - How does social media avoid being the next CRM fiasco? o It’s not technology, it’s about customer connection and engagement - Who’s doing SM well? Zappo’s, Comcast, Embark.Monitoring to Engagement:What do you do with the data? What are the real costs? Tool is the hammer, cost ofsupporting what you actually do with the data (customer service? Respond to customerissues) is the house.Integrating SM into the fabric of the company:
    • Best Buy Case Study: BestBuys conversations are broadcasted on monitors in theExec’s offices, all of a sudden people HAD to care about Social MediaWho owns SM within an organization?What do small and medium-sized businesses do to handle SM outreach?Monitoring the conversation:How does the content you broadcast reflect what the audience cares about?What are they saying/not saying?SEO-like approach- what are subject interests?Tools Round up:FREE TOOLS:Google Apps BlogpulseSearch.Twitter.com ConnectweetRSS Queries TweetdeckYahoo Pipes Seesmic desktopGoogle reader Retweet radarTechnorati TwitalyzerPAID:Radian6ScoutLabsGeneral Price Points: A) Couple hundred $/month: ScoutLabs B) Couple Thousand $/month: Radian6 C) $50K++: Visible TechnologiesSentiment: Don’t underestimate the value of sentimment. The key is what you do withthe analysis, how you integrate into the workflow.Companies:Andiamo: uses human analysis to measure sentimentAthena East: human analysis to measure sentiment, also deploy response teams toengage on SM on behalf of clientsRandom Notes From: Robert DellImmagine [rdellimmagine@vmware.com]-------------------------------ForumOne uses these social media sites: blogs, twitter, slideshare, scrubscript(documents), youtube, facebook, linkedin How do you monitor?Lightweight tools: radiant 6 -- captures metrics on conversations on the broadest rangeof channels
    • Others: andiamo, visible technologies, truecast Problem with heavy volume Measure ofsentiment -- what do you do with the data is the problem. Approach: generatecategories, e.g spam, computer-generated content, classified ads, splogsOne company is developing a product that identifies high-influence, high-volume placeswhere theres feedback, and highlights that. Then look at content -- is it relevant to yourcompany space and does it include words like "sucks". Then manually review the onesthat score highest. Measure change over time and see if it changes as you domarketing campaigns.- Engage customer support reps to monitor and respond to social media- In a similar fashion, CRM at first failed until organizations integrated with customerservice and marketing processes.- What do you do when you dont have a department to monitor social media?- B2B: fewer people talk about your brand than in B2C communities - Companies should monitor conversations related to their markets, not just thoserelated to our products. - Do we monitor competitors via social media?Tools for monitoring social media:Free tools: Google Alerts, technorati, search.twitter.com, Google Reader + YahooPipes (for RSS), Blog Pulse Cheap Tools: Radian6 (many people recommend this)Expensive: Visible PathMike Rowland session--------------------- Users own B2C communities; companies must participate in B2B- Push twitter & facebook people to a landing page where you can measure how manyyou attracted, then have them log in, and engage.- Highest correlation with purchase for decision-makers was when they visited executiveblogs describing company strategy. Lesson: do exec blogs right.- Impact Interactions: white paper titled "Growing the plateau" -- how to revitalize acommunity that has stalled out.- Intuit moved community from customer support to marketing (2 wks ago)Community-Driven Product Design-------------------------------Google Blogger product manager got all of his engineers on twitter. Goal is to shortenthe feedback loop between engineers and customers. Since it was the productmanager who pushed the idea, the engineers felt like it was their idea; rather than whenthe community manager proposes it, they feel its another task pushed on them.Accept360 for requirements collection and management.
    • Identifying and Engaging Online Influencers (2H)Convener: Gam DiasNotes-taker(s): Paul ArdoinOther Members:Dana Nourie Paul ArdoinHeather Rodde Heather SarkissianCynthia Schroeder Chris BankMatt Warburton Myrna RiveraKevin Burns Marcos PolancoLuchen Foster Andrew BishopLaSandra Brill Tom NickelJosh Stivers Mary SongMolly Robinson Melissa HasanThomas Miner Ron LiechtyWill Bunker Jenee ClineDiscussion Notes: Good Practices identified with context, key understandings,outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion:action items, next steps:Questions from the group:How do you find influencers?1. Identify the top 1% of your user population (AKA "superusers"). Superusers dontalways equal influencers; they must have good reputations, provide positive, valuableinput to community.2. Attempt to convert reviewers to bloggers.3. Look at user forums to analyze frequency of posts, number of responses, and theway responses generate discussion.4. Criteria can include reach and quality.5. Dias shares that he uses pre-built tools to discover whos talking about products andservices online, and to analyze the resulting statistics.6. Rating of the content that people provide can help find new influencers. (Usingweighted rankings, where anonymous users = 1 pt and other influencers = 10 pts, isalso helpful.)7. Challenge: convincing users that involving themselves with your company does notequal "selling out."What value do you provide the influencers?1. Incentives must be non-monetary. Examples: Microsoft MVP program, Walmarts "11Moms"
    • 2. A "tree structure" can reward people for different kinds of activity within thecommunity, such as "member of the week" or corporate rewards (e.g., Suns "DukeDollars")3. Provide early access to new products/services.4. Give influencers increasing levels of responsibilities (such as moderating comments).Organization must maintain "über-moderator," but much of the work can be sourced tothe influencers. (Some attendees have had varying levels of success with thisapproach; seems to change with type of community.)How many people should be influencers?1. Depends on criteria. Some felt their criteria might be too stringent.2. If you just want enhanced feedback, examples are usually under a population of 500.For influencers, population is usually under 50.3. The 1% - 9% - 90% pyramid was suggested as a guideline.4. The size of the corporate group dealing with influencers can shrink if the communityhas a high level of trust with the organization.How can you extract people from other communities into your community?1. Give people the opportunity to define themselves and port your company to theirother activities.2. Example: one participant wanted stronger participation in their online educationcommunity, but more discussion was taking place on an unofficial Facebook group. Justleave it there, or actively try to move it? a. Is this a problem? b. Are participants getting adequate value at community site? c. Are they having to give up too much? d. Are the FB users expectations not matching with what the community offers?When Influencers Attack1. Prepare for multiple scenarios when announcing a change.2. Communicate ahead of time.3. Have a specific point of content for questions.4. Engage with negative commenters within the context that company has set up, notwithin the commenters forum.5. Expect emotional reactions, and know that a cooling-off period is helpful.6. Are you listening to your influencers/users?7. Are you acknowledging their concerns?8. Do you have a process in place to weed out the trolls? (e.g., Walmarts customerservice contacts 1-star reviewers; sometimes the review is fake)9. Never lie.10. It is easier to lose trust than build it.11. Put it in perspective: what percentage of users are complaining? whatpercentage of complainers are influencers?
    • Big Community: Strategy Across Your Ecosystem (2I)Convener: Rachel WeidingerNotes-taker(s): Brenna Robertson, GoogleOther Members:Janet Fouts Robb MillerLauren Klein Brenna RobertsonPaul Wescott Marie GirardetAngie Ryan Jeremy LatimerRajesh Pandey Susan TenbyJun Shim Lily WongBill Johnston Katherine KornasBonnie Ho Jay MacIntoshLori Anderson Amy MullerJorge Dorantes Rachel WeidingerNathan GwilliamDiscussion Notes: Good Practices identified with context, key understandings,outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion:action items, next steps: • How do you decide who is an influencer? o Watch over time and see who has a lot of followers, playing w/ influencer tracker things on Twitter. But now need to expand beyond Twitter. o Tracker tool. o Tracking influence on FB? No. • Whats strategy to work across multiple platforms? o Twitter, Events. o OH community team manages this. • Its not about tracking people who are using different personas. • Have to understand the difference between the different medias / communities • Youre not going to get anywhere saying the same thing to the same people across different networks. • Idea is to have one over-arching umbrella. Use one voice but tailor to different communities • Have a blog. Promote other blogs. LinkedIn. • Strategy - your intention and goals and what does your audience want to do? • Focus on 4 or 5 touch points and evaluate on a quarterly basis. • Itd be a mistake to spit things into a bunch of different communities. • Adjust the way that you write. Be aware of how you communicate and make it more personal. • Didnt plan how to measure and track before starting - figure out which metrics youre going to look at before you start!
    • • Does presence on Twitter and FB replace community forum?• Using TW to push out blog posts, and putting things on FB site• FB posts are getting more comments than forum.• Does it matter where its coming in to?• If you can incorporate tagging, that helps• If the convos are happening everywhere, its more impactful than bringing everyone back to you.• People are comfortable w/ the platform they know, so push the content to the different places.• How to combine? How to feed back to community? OpenID helps.• Is the center of gravity moving out to the public sphere?• Difference in strategy - do you want there to be more conversations about X or do you want to own the conversations about X?• If all the SM sites went away, what would your users want?• You need comm. platform to keep the conversation.• Have a place in your comm where you aggregate whats out there.• Aggregate other peoples content to your network. Bring other communities to your network.• Do you get better data from the people who signed up on your site, rather than FB?• Yes, since you have user/acct info. Therefore, thats an argument to keeping comm in your site.• Is FB feedback diluted (since people arent necessarily going there to discuss your topic)?the g• Conversations on FB are much better than on my site, b/c theyre not influencers. More truthful b/c they dont have a specific agenda.• TCs response to FB and TW = build a better site on your own so youre not all over the place. Theyre very defensive and dont want to see us distribute convo.• Take a convo that starts on own community and then post on FB• At what point do you let presence on your comm go? How do you make that decision and how do you make it happen?• Weird when they announce on FB that they committed MySpace suicide. Just stop using MS instead.• But if you just stop w/o announcing, users think we dont care and arent engaging.• Doesnt reflect well on company.• Tell people where to go instead, when you leave somewhere.• Switched FB group to FB page. Put a big note on group and had people go to page. Stop promoting. Dont want to get questions at place you left, and have users go w/o a response.• Whats strategy, getting users engaged w/ each other? Whats your involvement. You getting involved changes the convo b/t users.• How do you switch resources around when convo moves?• Intuit: FB presence, events. Have migrated Yahoo! content over to Intuit platform. Doing little things to drive traffic.• Goals: product support and marketing.
    • • Stay on mailing lists. Be able to recommend different resources that exist (not necessarily yours). Then chime in on lists every once in a while.• Opening conversation vs. owning conversation.• Whats monetization strategy? Ad? Then you have to own convos. If youre just trying a brand, then it doesnt matter where the convo happens.• TW for cust support, PR, start convos about product. Works well. Mix of owning convo and just listening to dialogue.• Just important to be part of convo. Its not about the customer always coming to you. Its about finding the convo.• What happens when you go out to comm and participate in convo?• Everyone has a mic nowadays - so you cant control. You have to join in order to have some influence and participation. Then you gain credibility when they see that youre willing to go out and meet them where they are. This builds a great brand and PR.• No way to bring back to one place now. Have to have a strategy to manage multiple locations• People appreciate when you reach out to them via SM• Timing is good right now b/c people are cutting down on customer service.• Ebay housed the responsibility of listening to SM under Marketing, but marketing got cuts first, so that was the end of that. Should be under a communications group.• Should encourage all depts to participate• But, not all people are good at it, in which case its OK for some people to go through one person (as opposed to all tweeting on their own).• How would you tell someone how to tweet?• Explain what to cover• Corp guidelines are good for SM engagement so everyones comfortable. People want rules and examples.• What about people who are afraid of online identities?• Britney Spears example: she has a team that tweets under the same name, but they all sign w/ their own names. Its obvious when Britney tweets vs someone from her team.• Cotweet - use it.• ROI?• Track URLs you share so you can show that you added x people to list via Twitter link.
    • Social Psychology 101 for Community Managers (2J)Convener: Scott MooreNotes-taker(s): Scott Moores Notes on the session, they do not reflect all that wasdiscussed during the sessionOther Members:Terri Peluso Chris BaileyPeter Thoney BEcky HerdonPerrine Crampton Ganesha BhaskaraHeather Wong Aaron FavaraCarl Wakson Estee Solomon GrayDebbie Austin Gail Ann WilliamsZoya FAllah Keith SavageauMelyssa Nelson Shana BrennanSara Leslie John MooreDiscussion Notes: Good Practices identified with context, key understandings,outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion:action items, next steps:IntroI am not a social scientists, just a Community Manager who has been learning as I go.I want to share the moments of, "I know that, it has a name?" with you.The format is on definitions, examples and some practical applications.The main goal is to get you started in learning from other disciplines.The secondary goal is to improve ourselves as community managers and participantsas community members.(Additional notes: there is a community manager in Poland named Darek Kleczek whoblogs at "Leadership in Social Networks" who was the inspiration for putting this into aspecific form for community managers. Hes worth keeping an eye one as he developsideas about how we can encourage leaders to develop in our communities.)Fundamental Attribution ErrorDefinition:People tend to presume the actions of others are indicative of the "kind" of person theyare rather than their actions being caused by a situation.Based on experiment by Edward E. Jones and Victor Harris (1967). Coined by LeeRoss (1977). Sometimes called "correspondence bias", but not by all social scientists.Examples:Community makes error against their own: First time posters who make a social mistakebeing considered a troll.Community applies attribution error to community host: Considering the hostuncaring/out of touch when tech changes occur suddenly or when the host makes adecision about Terms of Service (accused of playing favorites).
    • Reducing the Effect:The attribution error occurs usually because there is not enough information about thesituation. Studies have shown that when victims of crime learn more about the criminalscircumstances views tend to shift from desiring harsh penalties to compensation forlosses.To prevent yourself from committing the fundamental attribution error, gather situationalinformation:Do people tend to behave the same way in the same situation?What would I do in the same situation?Ask the person for help in understanding their situation.To reduce the effect when others are applying the fundamental attribution error to you,disseminate the situational information.publicly realign yourself/your org with community goals/values.clarify the way the situation is leading to types of behavior.Examples:ask potential spammers for personal situation before assuming they are evil. (They maybe enthusiastic and not realize the norms of your community)Explain situation behind any changes to your community before the changes areimplemented. (You may also enlist aid from community to float preferable changes.)INTERMISSION: A note about conflict management/mediationI will not be covering conflict management or conflict mediation, though many examplesinvolve these skills. I am willing to help anyone with questions about resources. For thewiki, this might be a good place to compile some resources.Actor-observer biasDefinition:We tend to attribute our own behavior to the situation, but the behavior of others to the"kind" of person they are.Developed by Edward E. Jones/ Richard E Nesbett (1971) as the flip side ofFundamental Attribution Error.However, Bertram F. Malle questions actor-observer bias because of a lack of evidence(2006).Example:"I am not a bad person."Reducing the Effect:Awareness that this may be happening (on your part, on the part of the person judgingyou, on the part of two community members towards each other).Use the same methods as the Fundamental Attribution Error: learn more about thesituation.Examples:This is as much about self-reflection as it is observation of others.I once had an argument with a vendor that seemed to be about their customer serviceattitude when the truth was I (and our organization) were asking more than the vendorcould give. Realizing this allowed us to enter future vendor deals with realisticexpectations, fewer conflicts and better results.
    • Confirmation BiasDefinition:We tend to look for, or better remember, information and evidence that supports ourpreconceptions and avoid/overlook/forget evidence that counters our beliefs.Examples:Good luck charms, people who believe in psychics/cold readers, belief that a computerproblem is because of a virus transmitted by your web siteReasons:We may be wired this way. If a successful survival strategy works, its better to repeatthe strategy than experiment. If a prehistoric tribe succeeds in hunting a deer, they arelikely to stick with it rather than risk going hungry. But its a short jump from attributingthe successful hunt to a pretty stone instead and thus the good luck charm is born.The person facing evidence to their belief may feel shame, stubbornness or hope.Other factors that may filter counter-evidence may include tradition, taboos, religion,ideology.Reducing the Effect:View information impartially. Welcome counterarguments. ("Strong opinions, looselyheld" - ******** )Combating this in yourself: imagine a demon, similar to Maxwells Daemon that acts asa gatekeeper to your senses, allowing agreeing facts in and deflecting facts that counteryour beliefs. (aka Mortons Daemon)Social FacilitationDefinition:We tend to do simple tasks that we know well better with an audience than alone. But,we tend to do new or complicated tasks worse in the same situation.Examples:Performance anxietyReducing the Effect:Encourage practice.Provide graduated experiences such as encouraging poll voting or rating beforesubmitting opinions, reviews or other content. Also, allow people to create content andcontrol ever-widening circles of who sees the content.Compliment when a new or difficult task is attempted.Examples:Warm welcomes without correction when someone contributes for the first time.Social LoafingDefinition:When work is pooled and individual performance is not known, people in groups tend toput in less effort.Examples:Reducing the Effect:Reveal individual performance for simple tasks (to avoid problems in Social Facilitation).
    • For complicated tasks, keep performance private until proficient.Examples:Badges in online game systems. Simple acknowledgement of simple accomplishmentsand difficult accomplishments. People sometimes complain when a game does notprovide badges showing the power of revealing individual performance.Bystander EffectDefinition:Individuals are less likely to offer help in an emergency situation when other people arepresent.Specific to online communities, groups dont handle conflict situations when there is aperception that someone else will handled it faster or with more authority.Originated around Kitty Genovese who was stabbed to death in 1964 and "no onehelped". The story is dramatic, but not entirely true. The media failed to contact thepolice for information before reporting the story and possibly committed confirmationbias in avoiding information undermining the belief in the bystander effect. In fact, thepolice were contacted at least once during the attack and "bystanders" heard, but couldnot see the attack.The Bystander effect was demonstrated in experiments in 1968 by John Darley andBibb Latane.Examples:In the late 80s the a gaming service called The ImaginNation Network was havingproblems with users harassing each other. There was no formal reporting process somembers were a bit on their own with few ways to contact the service. The serviceadded a "report abuse" button and, quickly, the number of reports increased. Themembers stopped trying to resolve the problems themselves and resorted to the abusebutton first.Reasons:Social influence. We tend to look at how others are reacting in situations for cues onwhat to do. If everyone is waiting to see what others do, no one will act.Assumption that others will intervene and feel no special responsibility.Fear of being evaluated (Social Facilitation), embarrassment, or being superseded bysomeone more skilled.Uncertain help is wanted.In online communities, when authority moves fast or decisively.Reducing the Effect:As a Community Manager, drag your feet a little. Give the space for others to step inand encourage them when they do. (Once I had someone who was great at helping inthe community in a specific way, he was so fast and so good, others were commentingon him "beating them to it". I praised him for being a great example and ask him to be alittle slower off the mark. When he did, others were able to step in. This took thepressure off him and eventually lead to a strong culture of helping in a specific way.)As a Community manager, do not use your admin tools first or often. Resolve conflictspublicly as a way to demonstrate to others how they too can handle them. This wouldbe a literal empowerment of your community.
    • Instill a sense of responsibility and empower the members by following up when theyhelp or get in over their heads. Allow the community to help you spot spam and dealwith items they flag. IF someone attempts to resolve a conflict and has trouble, thenstep in (and later privately help the person improve their skills).Other social theoriesThese were not covered during the session. They are presented briefly to provide somebackground to common terms a community manager will encounter as they read deeperinto social psychology and sociology.Small World ExperimentStanley MilgramAverage path length for social networksDropped letter with a note asking to send to person they know who is likely to know thetarget on letter.Multiple factors could have accounted for the average path length he foundMilgram never used the phrase "six degrees of separation"Work in disease transmission indicates that removing the supernodes of a network haslittle impact on average path length.Dunbar NumberRobin DunbarTheoretical cognitive limit to the number of people humans can maintain a stable(grooming) relationship.Based on primate grooming habits. Max grooming contacts seems limited to volume ofneocortex.1992 - Dunbar extrapolated up to human size brain and derived the number 150Then compared this to human groups (tribes, basically)Dunbar says communities must have high incentive to remain together (stablerelationships). Speculated that humans may spend up to 42% of their time in socialgrooming.For much, much more, read what Christopher Allen has to say about group size startingwith his three-part series,Community by the Numbers, which also links to an additional 6 article examining theDunbar Number and online group sizes.Fixing Broken WindowsGeorge Kelling and Catherine ColesFix small problems to dissuade larger problems and, eventually, huge problemsNYC Experiment:NYC Transit Authority 1985 - 1993+Gulianis zero tolerance 1993 -Major crime did go down. But it also went down in cities that did not have zero tolerancepolicies. (See Confirmation Bias)Robert Cialdini - Influence
    • Appeal to majority"Many guest waste towels. Please dont." - Little effect on reusing towels."Most guests reuse towels. We thank you." - Increase in reuses of towels.Influence reciprocationWhen a waiter brings mints with the check, there is a slight increase in tips.CommitmentLearned from NPO event days. If you ask people to sign up, but do not charge,attendance will be significantly lower than expected. If you ask people to pay $20 duringsign up, attendance will be much closer to expected.Conformity - social proofmonkey see, monkey do.Be the alpha monkeyTeach others to be the alpha monkey.Scarcity - In the midst of a credit crisis with people being told to stop using their creditcards, what does VISA do? They create a new "exclusive" card. The VISA Black Card.The exclusiveness will generate desire despite rational.When one member of a couple is trying to convince the other to make a change, thosewho mention the existing relationship before requesting the change had better success.Think to current Obama phrasing that our problems are "American problems".Reminding us of current relationship as Americans before asking Republicans forchange.Notes-taker(s): Christine TranDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: 1. Fundamental Attribution Error: We presume that actions of other people result from what kind of person they are, rather than circumstances a. Ex: Trolls, we don’t think people come from different backgrounds or didn’t understand the community well b. Ex: You make a sudden change in the community, like Facebook TOS and everyone hates you c. Reduce effect when presenting by giving more information and transparency (Ex. When victims of crime hear more about perpetrator’s circumstances they shift from wanting revenge to restitution) i. Elicit more information from the “offender” ii. Give more information 2. Actor/Observer Bias: Mirror above; We attribute our own behavior to situations, but assume others behaviors are based on who they are. “I’m not a bad person.” a. Ex: When we do something in our own community, we know why we did it. b. So we need to communicate our situation to the community, especially at the slightest whiff of controversy 3. Confirmation Bias: We look for or better remember evidence that supports our perceptions; we avoid/forget evidence that doesn’t support our beliefs a. Ex. Good luck penny, fortune tellers
    • b. Why? If our survival strategy works, we’re wired not to experiment with new c. When 2 people are presenting they feel strongly about, they may ignore some facts which leads to conflict d. Community ground rules should include: i. We respect research based information ii. We respect and are open to opinions iii. No personal attacks4. Social Facilitation: We do simple tasks well better if there’s an audience, then when alone. But we do new or complicated tasks worse. Basically, performance anxiety. a. Ex. Twitter – making first tweet is public b. Think about this in your community; give people opp to contribute first time privately c. When people contribute first time, welcome them d. Don’t correct people publicly at the beginning (Ex. If their first contribution was spammy)5. Social Loafing: When work is pooled and individual contribution is not known, then drive to perform better is reduced. Assumption that other people are doing the work. a. Reveal the individual contributions in group efforts.6. Bystander Effect/Social Proof: When people unsure what to do in situation, you look to others. But if others don’t know what to do, then no one does anything. a. Ex. “Report abuse” button on website leads to skyrocket in # of reports because people abdicate responsibility b. Sometimes OK to drag your feed in regards to conflict between 2 people c. Create a vacuum and let other people fill in sometime. Set the model first and then distribute the work7. Some more terms to think about: a. Small world experiment: Stanley Milgrim dropped a letter with note asking to send note to person you think would know the person in the note. Like 6 degrees of separation. b. Dunbar number – Theoretical cognitive number of stable relationships humans can sustain. 150, but this was done pre-industrial. c. Broken windows theory: Violent crime correlates to broken windows, discarded cars, etc. Ex. Spam d. Robert Cialdini’s Influence: i. Appeal to majority. Ex. “Most people reuse towels. Thank you.” Sign at hotel. ii. Influence reciprocation. Ex. If waiter gives mint, tip goes up iii. Commitment. Ex. Free vs. $20 for an event. iv. Conformity. Ex. Alpha monkeys, monkey see monkey do, teach others to be alpha
    • Selecting the Right Community Platform (2L)Convener: AjayNotes-taker(s): Carol LinOther Members:Chris Kranyak Karen McAdamsKaren Robbins Ganesha BhaskaraDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Any new techniques to enourage interaction?How to build community with parents, children and teachers in regards to music - Facebook not appropriate, but how to create new demographics in these sources? - Protect kids experienceGlue browser community - social browserWhat’s your criteria? Platform dependent on criteria (generally boils down to 2 reasons) 1. Revenue 2. MarginAmEx members community: - UGC - Members apply for grants - Youtube channel - Card members vote - Crowd sourcing - Great brand awarenessThere’s a social causeTo decide on platform, need to determine: 1. what is primary goal and objective of community? 2. what are criteria requirements?UGC is very present in communities: - YouTube - Ustream, Justin.tv - Tokbox video chat - Oovoo multi person chat
    • - Kyte.tv have both public/private channelsMobile “nagging” programsMake sure content is portable culture going towards mobile products, less oncomputers1.0 Webforms Php, bulletins, evolved to blogging platforms Merged with contect management systems (Drupel), forums, wikisRunning one community sometimes failingTurn towards other sources (myspace, facebook) and loop them in to one platform
    • Open Space Third Session Topics
    • W.O.M. Branding (3B)Convener: Ajay RamachandranNotes-taker(s): Alexa BruceOther Members:Cynthis Schroeder Bonnie HoAngie Ryan Jenee ClineBetsy Burroughs John SummersAlexa Bruce Chris BankChistine MasonIntro from AjaySourceN background - was in services, now in product world; built all types ofcommunities • WOM branding - how to encourage brand evangelizatoin • Brand marketing is changing; budgets are lowered -> performance-based marketing (brand advocates vs. running ads) • Size of community doesnt matter if you are getting the required infoQuestions • How to manage the outreach and how to feed info to advocate • How to motivate and grow brand evangelists • How do you know it is working? • Psychology of word of mouth - what gets people to respond, retweet? • How to syndicate? • How to tie in the Brand Ambassador program with the forum?Case Studies • American Express action - contribute social projects, AmEx will fund and card holders decide which to fund result - positive awareness and affinity and revenue potential (card members are engaged -> loyalty/NPS 9 which is 2 pts higher than other card holders) • United Airlines action - Twitter promotion to offer discount to tweeter result - retweet rate high • Dell action - Twitter deals result - $1M of product in 30 days
    • • Burger King action - how many of friends sacrifice for a burger? result - awareness and press (shut down by facebook)• Autodesk Education goal - awareness and brand awareness; feedback on the programs action - on campus advocates; passionate about the product and want access to more info, training; 5 come to conf each year; monthly incentives ($100/mo gift card) result - on the ground advocates to drive people to the community; can measure # of users from each school (is it rep or other campaigns) so compare campuses with and without reps; viral impact on professors, students etc.• How to reach audience• Channel: Twitter, YouTube• Who: get users of the product/service on• What: real-time info/time sensitive questions to know answer to - polls, feedback generosity - passing on good stuff from others • dont post new article and our site, needs to be engaging so post snippets/subject line to email• How incentive-based system to create a larger audience (points/rewards) and make action public so everyone knows (network effect) behind the scenes reach out to brand influencers• Measure NetPromotor score to see before and after for loyalty and retention Twitter - Measure what posts lose or gain followers; who to reply to and engage with Impressions on ads - sponsored ads and engagement ads Create ap on top of Facebook to capture data to understand (who the influencers are, top topics, tonality/sentiment)
    • Communications Skills for Community Managers (How toeffectively be an advocate for users and your company) (3D)Convener: Adena DeMonteDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Tools to see where your users are going / which SM sites they are using: • Identify • social mention - http://www.socialmention.com • rapleaf - http://www.rapleaf.com/Different angles of relationships w/ community management: • CEO/business • Engineers • Customer Service • Customers • Marketing • PRMarketing needs are sometimes different than those of the users.Ebay had their own community management group • Team was required to understand business strategy. Need good communication skills to internal and external audiences. Need to understand what community needs. • Did your move from PR to Marketing affect your group? No. A lot of autonomy.Lithium engineering hasnt had that experience. How to communicate w/ marketing? -Ebay spoke for customer and understood what their users wanted. Asked users underNDA (w/ other areas of eBay listening in) what they thought of new idea, feature,product, etc.Does the title "community manager" give wrong idea? Were just facilitatingconversation.Engineers - Ways that you can be an advocate for the community to your engineers(and other parts of the company). How do you convince folks? • Always present clear proposal w/ steps, include ROI. • Be patient • Empower engineers / developers to understand what your goal is. • Analytical evidence - engineers are driven by numbers • Have to have a partnership w/ engineer and developer. 1:1.
    • • Leave wiggle room so engineers can add in their own creative. Explain issue in a broad, conversational way. Give timeframe.Do surveys work? • User voice has worked. Community votes on which features they want implemented. This creates loyalty and interest in product w/ users, b/c theyre involved. • Lithium does this - ideation. • Have to close the loop back to users. • You can say no to feature requests, just have the dialogue. • This tool can be effectively used w/ engineering - product development. • If you dont use this strategy, remember that engineers arent interacting directly w/ customers.Engineers want to know what goals are - what are you trying to achieve, vs what exactfeature you want. Also add in prioritization. Purpose and priority. Engineers can vary,though.Chat support. Engineers working directly w/ customers via chat. Gets engineers to startthinking differently. Does this work w/ a big company? Everyone in company has tounderstand what guidelines are. • Have to understand what youre asking of engineers. • Look at your company strategy - rotate between departments so everyone gets a chance to interact w/ users.What about overlap between comm. management and marketing. • Be open about who your audience would be. • How do you decide when do you get involved? • Etienne Wenger - designing, developing and launching communities. Co-create together. http://www.ewenger.com/ • Have to understand that youre not just publishing content by posting a blog post, but youre adding to the community and engaging in the community. • Think about how your additions and content adds to the community as a whole.CEO relationships - advice? • Lithium white paper about communicating community health • Show CEO metrics of whats coming out of your community - e.g. deflection from call center, sales, etc. • Webinar next week at Lithium about this topic - Community Health Index • Before you present something, ask yourself where holes are, so youre prepared for counter arguments. • Lithium has a community for community managers - ask questions, start discussions
    • If you build it they will come. Not. Tips and Tricks forGrowing Community (3E)Convener: David PeckNotes-taker(s): Christine TranOther Members:Carole Watson Jay MacIntoshMyrna Rivera Lori AndersonDenise Kalos Carol LinLorraine Freeman Sara LeslieChristine Tran Jen NestelJaysie McCinn Rachel RomeroDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Heard a lot: We built a community but we didn’t know what to do with it. Do we want to drive more people? Do we want existing users to be more engaged? Do you want a user community or do you want to market your product? Twitter feed shouldn’t just be you posting content pr or newsfeed. No engagement, no talking with customers. Twitter can be a great engagement channel. Better description on page. o Comment back to people using key words on Summize. o 80/20 – 80 personal and engagement, 20 marketing re: contents of tweets SEO of key words on tweets, blogs and such helps with online presence Create interesting conversations through controversial links Do timely blog posts o Ex. Sat on a post about features until now because Facebook adding vanity URLs and this would be a good trending topic on Twitter. Added #vanityurl. Should be on as many social networking sites as possible o Hellotext, ping.fm, Linkedin, BrightKite, Clerk, Yahoo Pipes o Be careful about cross posting o Monitor and respond to feedback o Make sure to use bit.ly to track your links and data Everybody should have Facebook connect A couple people said there Facebook fan pages are growing, and getting traffic to their site How do you know where your target audience is? o Twitter and FB biggest but there’s much more. 40 year olds, 50 year olds? o Survey your customers and ask them where they go
    • o Must do proper market segmentation before you engage in social network. Who’s your target, where do they go, how to engage them, and get them to return. o You’re better off with 1000 hits from people interested in your product, rather than 100,000 random peopleSites need editorial leadership whether internal or external. Establish editorialcalendar. Use tools like RSS to pull stuff in, doesn’t to be original everyday.Tweetlater to time delay your tweetsDoes anyone know if there a cycle of eyeballs on Twitter at certain times of day?Perhaps use Xefer? Pay Radian6. CMD uses a lot of tools including Radian6.Poll the community and ask them what they wantTraditional marketing activities to drive traffic to siteOffline eventsRegister on Digg, StumbleUpon, and LinkedIn Questions and Answers
    • B2B Communities - What works, Best Practices From thepast 10 years of B2B Community Management (3F)Convener: Mike RowlandNotes-taker(s): Shara KarasicOther Members:Ray Eisenberg Angela HeyJohn Moore Ron LiechtyDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Key takeaways: • You cant apply B2C practices to B2B communities. Tie your efforts to clearly defined objectives - business results, not traffic results. • Mike doubts the community managers myth of 90-9-1 participation ratio. In B2B space, blog metrics have a ratio closer to 99-.9-.1. In support communities where people can ask a quick question, the 9% expands. In Impact Interactions experience with B2B communities, the participation results are all over the map. And those participation numbers dont account for declines in participation as members age. • B2B communities are very different than B2C in terms of function, objectives, members, and participation. • "B2B communities should have higher participation levels because members come to find information and build relationships with the company offering the community. If they find what they want, they return." • A good way to bring social elements into a B2B community without being too personal is to elevate not only a person, but also their company. • Promotion-->Conversion-->Lead in CRM. • Usage-->Member Response-->Cost Avoidance • Dont confuse traffic and behavior with value. Value = revenue, leads, lower support costs, awareness, purchases, insight. • Pass the skeptic test by being realistic - economics are important. Soft value propositions = soft budget. • Speed and time are of essence in reaching business decision makers. Higher level execs want to interact with peers only. • In a B2B community, lack of company involvement decreases ROI. Strong company participation = higher brand loyalty, customer satisfaction. Company involvement is expected in B2B community as opposed to B2C - where company involvement may be frowned upon. In B2B community, you as host must participate a lot (as an information provider). • Senior executives use communities to get case studies - they delegate information gathering to lower-level employees.
    • • B2B survey research from multiple client communities: 60+% of members are influenced to buy based on something they read or saw in the community.• B2B survey research from multiple client communities: 35-40% of B2B community visitors gather information for purchasing decisions.• "Not all value is economic value - there is value in customer service satisfaction. Its not always ROI."• Work data from CRM and community database to find economic value.• "Dont start a community just because others are doing it. It will not revolutionize the way business is done."• Execs want results - so get your reporting in shape before launch. Detailed enough, avoid overload. Executive summary should be focused on value insight into why community is performing or not.• Cisco NetPro community - slow growth in 2000. Now, growth curve is only slight faster. If you expect to get 20-30,000 users among 600,000 customers, could take 12-18 months at least.• Dont give overly optimistic projections - expect cost overruns for tools, services, development• 3 measurement categories - traffic, behavior within the community, value - what did we gain by offering the community?• For B2B communities, dont lead with qualitative insights.• If you are going after business decision makers, they want success stories.• For B2B communities, criticism of brand is always an issue, Know the resources required.• When talking to top-level management, talk about business objectives, not touchy-feely stuff.• Large enterprises should use Twitter/Facebook to send traffic to specific landing pages. Give them a call to action. Measure B2B referrals from each third party application (your clicks)• Dont ever use email list to executives. If not opt-in, they will have their admin assistant call your CEO.• Focus B2B community efforts and resources on key drivers of economic value for your organization.• Most BDMs dont participate in forums due to time constraints. No shiny tools for their own sake. Have to make sense for goals.• Dont be all things to all people in your community. C-level, BDMs, upper level influencers want to engage with peers• If you are going after business decision makers, they want success stories. Make it easy for them to find what they want. Speed and time are of essence.• In young B2B communities, you need to work to build relationships. Your ratio of activity needs to be higher at first. No, it doesnt scale• In low involvement B2B communities such as Q & A, you need a team to start with. 2-10 depending on breadth, activity.• Re: marketing in B2B communities. Higher expectations than B2C. Expect a professional environment. But, they expect to be marketed to (some marketing is okay - but providing info, not hard sell).
    • How to Engage Communities Outside of TraditionalDiscussion Boards (3G)Convener: Amber AuthierNotes-taker(s): Shara KarasicOther Members:Maryam Webster Carole McManusTerri Peluso Keith SavageauNavneet Grewal Marilyn JaynesHeather Wong Shana BrennanDave Kim Frankie CallahanDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:How to engage communities outside of traditional discussion boards • Has the discussion board method reached its peak? Resource intensive. • Yahoo no longer has traditional message boards except of Yahoo Finance. o Yahoo Answers is the current solution. Let the user control. o Traditionally message boards filled the role, now going deeper with groups (Babycenter) • Rich deep content that cant be produced on our own • Man they keep these rooms cold, don’t they. • Commenting • How do you start engagement? Sometimes the best way is to seed the conversation, plant some of your own internal users to catalyze the conversation. • Give the community room to grow and learn. • Reputation is increasingly important in communities. • Be careful how you reward and recognize users, some of them don’t actually want it. • Realize the involvement and “density” of the role you’re assigning people as moderators and “gurus”. o Watch their activity and gauge interest in that participation. • Be careful with incentives, you don’t want your superusers to expect it. • Almost any conversation on your site is good. You want to keep them engaged on your property and not on others. “Watercooler” topic. • Don’t let the superusers overpower you. It’s still your site • Post an article in the boards and let people respond on the boards. • You only have a problem if your users think you have a problem. • Any examples of engaging online communities offline? o Find common interests to create a local offline community. o Yelp is a good example of bringing communities offline. • Hunch.com is a new crowdsourcing tool to help resolve community questions. It has potential to be a powerful support channel in the future.
    • Online Community for Social Good and Change (3H)Convener: Jill Finlayson from SocialedgeNotes-taker(s): Valerie KameyaOther Members:Katherine Kornas Luchen FosterJanet Foots Brian SullivanJessica Margolin Nathan GwilliamTerry Nagel Hiren Patelhris Wolz Julia BoonMatt Sharp Andrew BoonAlex Parlini Tiffany vonEmmelSusan Tenby Krys FreemanChas Warner Rachel WeidingerDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Why are you having an online community? why/who/what you want to do?non profits- mult stakeholders- donors, execs...where is this discussion going to happen? decentralized convohow do you get ppl to make social change? social actions and petitions, fundraising,creating evangelists. micro fundraising or spam? microfriendraising? online fundraisingimpact offline fundresearch, cultivate evangelists?Group concerns, backgrounds:add features w/o disrupt current commhow ppl track social change affectingfb for familyonline interactions to valuationcollab and comm around prof audienceshow foundations/grantees fit into online commprogram to develop proposalsSuccess stories-Blogging- picked up by people following org- internationally. not nec paying membersbut spreading the message. no desig spot for ppl to have community.Look at corp side of nonprofits- what are they doing? who could be key evangelist?often corp looks to nonprofits to lead charge w/few resourcesGroupery- focused on PTAs. SAS. online reg for school year. saved 20K pieces of
    • paper for 500 kids registered for school. saved 600 copies. Carbon footprint analysissavings.Twitter-search, other apps search for self id social entrepreneurs. supporters of educcommunities.whos in comm? whos it for?are staff part of community? y/n?wallmart- associates active part of comm. saving $ and being green. over 40% of ideasgenerated by associates (staff).constituency or beneficiaries part of comm?bridging geographic divides for employees. feel like you know them- work better well.corporate- soc networking based comm as employee portal. US employees interestedin life in India. Way to bridge communities.Some bridges between open and closed communities.Go where traffic is or drive traffic to site?Care2 -other ppl leverage current community.Posting issues in own online community- but got more traffic on FB discussion group.focus on unique products on site.Cons- going outside own comm- piecemeal. ppl discussing your issue everywhere-putting out your msg out- checking content in mult places. control, data access,reporting.both/and strategy. picnic blankets at music festival- do you set up your blanket and joinbig party? own blanket? keep food at your blanket for people who come by but go toother party?ppl in email and SMS. options that work for them, serves them.SEM- search engine mkt.FB and home comm overlapping but differentWhat are you trying to do and what are the objectives.Dont repurpose same content in all channels. We all start like this- but innovate.Twitter- time- info source. as decision made, tweeted out. relationship with subscribers.
    • journalists value RT info.Dont just jump to the tools. Non-siloed approach- mission- what are you trying to do.starting comm -figure out where they are technologically, where aud is, then go there.Alternately- try diff types of comm.Stamina impt. Ppl assume they will be viral overnight. Hard work to get it.500K email list- how long to acquire? How long does it take to build a following of 500K?As Oprah joins, becomes a norm to be on it. Becomes a conquest- territory buildinginstinct- be on Twitter, FB. Competitors- if theyre not there, it could be a good place forme to be. Alt: everyones there, we should be there too. Bad strategy but against humannature.Competitors vs. collabs in nonprofit space. Build in incentive- no $ buyout when yousave the forest besides your morals.Go there first, let the others follow. Collab with them- they raise the ship. You benefit themost by being best known.3 tree orgs- When one org sees tweet (or RTs) another, cross pollination betweenorgs audiences.Schools- my child vs. comm of children. Focused on revenue. Balancing indiv vs groupneeds.Non-profit- coalition work solution. Inefficient, diff to manage. Model that works wheneveryone has a mutual interest. ex: Equality CA- bringing in faith-based comm. , othercomm they didnt reach out to earlier.Coalitions- no one stepping back and examining a consolidated approach foroffline/online campaigns.Obama/Howard Dean fundraising. How does it work now (tweeting from Obama) afterelection?Soc networking democratizes the platform. interact together to get more done morequickly. avg person gives to 7 org. half cant remember name of org.comm by default- ppl all over map, memb of other orgs, bring all orgs in. rising tide pplwho have diff interests for the same cause. democ -peer to peer. all orgs will benefit insame comm.87 diff petitions on same thing not as effective as 1. help or silo?
    • petitions effective or making work b/c ppl think its good for ppl to do action.grass tops (petition legislators) vs grass roots work.Letter to Obama- petition. letter. ppl put emotion into it. more successful.define success. ecrm solutions, delete multiple copies of email. how much of contentactually get through? most of house and senate- put little stock in emails. believe allplagiarized, dont believe those ppl sent them.sierra club got home depot to change a policy. illegal to sell baby harp seal pelts ineurope. combination of grass roots. supplement to legislation.how do we enable real social change.kiva- allow one on one loan to ppl. ppl vote w/dollars.tweetdeck for legislators- look at their feedbackepa ignores emails b/c the look identicalclick to send- slacktivismsocial actions- aggregates things to do appearing next to articles.the extraordinaries. extraordinaries- organized microvolunteering.from cell phones.private industry- get tech support questions answered by volunteers.non-profits- aggregation of social media.tipjoy on twitter- issues. make sure platforms work for your org.what doesnt work? allow users to select where resources go for non-profits- makes thisnot a strategic decision. Microfinancing- spam or help? Idealblob -tweetsgiving.Staffhours getting ppl to vote. Exhausting donors.FB causes- model that doesnt work. Web 1.0 model. Tell ppl I have it, you should give.Unless get them guilty because they didnt give. Not loyal donor. MIcroamounts socialnetworking obligations, not thoughtful. Opposite of yellow brick road. Most votes = bestorg? What does this popularity signify? Are you helping you constituents?Tweeting 1K $1 a piece to retweet. tipjoy- everyone set up tipjoy acct. 30% fee. namesdont go to nonprofit.Collab and contribute to a project. Geog dispersed. Volunteer opp. matching. Peer topeer volunteering. post all over web.How to make this not patchwork? or not an all-in-one solution? Get volunteers to do it;power users to help you. Non-profit skeletal staff. Give power users power to beevangelists.
    • same content, diff audblog --> newsletter highlights of blogreal time ppl can tweet before blogbillboards, radio, satellite tveach channel- cost structure, audroot cause- can but dont need to be on all of them.before you start investing significantly, articulate it. strategy. trial and error.teaching groups together- twitter, using wikis
    • Social Network Sociology Analysis (3J)Convener: Mark A SmithNotes-taker(s): Gail Ann WilliamsDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:NodeXL -- runs on Excel 2007.Analysis of relationships within a social network requires a lot of math, complexdiagrams... and coding.Complex diagrams can be "ties that blind" -- very confusing. "Who replies to who"charts can show who are the Question people and who are the Answer people in aconversation. (Determining roles from charts allows you to later track or contact valuedparticipants.)Roles, flavors of participation: - Minimal - 66% of participants. Isolates, single posts - Regular contributors - 2% of participants (prolific and can be broken into distinctroles)Answerers, discussion starters, discussion (continuers)... all roles within the 2% whoare "People of high degree" of connections. Connections are in or outbound(sometimes both between a pair of participants) - High outbound count for a node (a person) defines an Answerer - Discussion node (person) has both in and outbound contacts, etc...To use NodeXL - grab stats and transform into an edge list. Make an A to B list...username1 username2 ... for responses, friending, or any action... generate graphs."Harvest" is the commerical Telligent consumer product based on this project.Important concepts you may learn while using this include "Clustering Coeficient"(precent based on possible connections among nodes.) The "Eigen Vector" is the hotconcept.NodeXL download is for highly specialized mapping of wha is going on in thecommunity -- licensed for free use, has had 9000 downloads. What is an influencer in the graph? A node that is a high and DISCERNING connector.Look up the Adamic study of Yahoo Answers on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~ladamic/ <http://www-personal.umich.edu/%7Eladamic/>for examples of "egonets." Perhaps the most valuable visual. There is a difference between Q&A, discussion and emotional support environmentsthat is easily seen in patterns of nodes and connections.
    • Plenty of tools for good coders, the NodeXL approach is for those who are not coders.Pajek (an app from Slovenia) is very good but assumes high skills. See codeplex.com(mentioned other examples) There is a (somewhat out of date) NodeXL tutorial. Future of the product is to improvescale, clarity ad connection. There is more to come."OCD drives the internet" Chart a ratio of inbound degree to outbound degree, thendays since answered. The top answerers often participate 333 days per year, and 8days off signals trouble.See Marcs powerpoint at http://slideshare.com/Marc_A_Smith (Alsohttp://twitter.com/marc_smith )
    • What Is Community Leadership? (3K)Convener: Scott MooreNotes-taker(s): Scott DoddsDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Community Leadership has a lot of definitionsInterested in hearing about what the definitions are and how we foster leadership withinthe communitiesWhy are people here?Tech advancements have societal implications, and someone needs to lead - how doesleading a social media community differ from leading a department in a company or afamily?Scott had some great ideas in the last session (social psychology 101), and wanted tohear more. Also hear from other community leaders and the lessons they have to shareMore interested in learning how models prosper, since only know what we have donebeforeHow to nurture an open source community in a commercial context - more interested inthe human aspect, and how to mediate conflict between members.Work with internal communities, and view leadership as synonymous with being achampion and facilitation - how to spread the wealth.From innovation/technology community, and helping the influencers, power users andgrowlearn more about how other communities treat leadership and enable leadershave found there needs to be a driving force and purpose, then it is not so hard todelegate and get others to do things for you. And how important recognition is - how doyou translate that into an online modelScott Moore: in the past, he had been avoiding personal leadership as much aspossible, so looked to find leadership and cultivate it. Interested in the study of tribes(Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches by Marvin Harris), particularly the Big Man role thatdoes not lead directly (not the Chief) but facilitates the economic activity, etc. thedifference between authority and leadership. "The power behind the throne"
    • Worked for WebMD communities and blog network - in the process of beingindependent and involved in the political scene, saw how communities can make adifferenceHelping to develop the Microsoft MSN communities, but also in the grassroots politicalsense.tend to be in a leadership position, first instinct is to do it herself - how to learn how todelegate to others in the community.finds the question of how leadership is going to happen is neglected, if the company isnot going to do it themselves, how to make it possible for the community to takeleadership themselves.Speaks to the difference between community leadership and community moderation.Having a clearing defined governance model is essential - found the Ubuntu communitymodel very good.BDFL: benevolent dictator for life - that person appoints Community Council members,in charge of defining and refining the rulesTechnically Board - works with the community to define high levelTask group: forms and is approved by the community council membersHow is the Community manager not the BDFL?Way we understand it is the BDFL is the spiritual leader, with power to put on the brake(veto)CM is the day-to-day leader, within the councilSort of like church and state modelAnother model is the Product managers lead (dictators) and the community managersits in the middle, a liaison between the two interests. Its a good thing the roles are split,since the company has its own interests, and the members have theirs - the companyBDFL cant argue against his companys interests, but the CM can play that role.Ubuntu members felt exploited, the CM steps in to mediateEvery community is different, but how do you identify and solicit those roles?They will exhibit the desired behaviors, and then you would approach them (back-channel, email). Through observation, and integrity check/trusted by the community.The way to promote them is to encourage others to view their contentthe subject matter expert and the leaders are often separate. Connectors are a skill inthemselves.
    • The connector is the host of the party, the welcoming committee.There are conversationalists, who stir the post, keep the conversations going.Wiki communities, leadership flows to those who do the most work - most content,highest quality edits, etc. may not have the people skills. Lead by exampleTrying to take SMEs and supplementing them with those with people skillsVeterans/elders are a good source for leadership within the community, becausetheyve been there and know the lay of the land - also come with baggagehas anyone tried anything formal to improve the people skills of the leaders? Onemember tried to bring some training on non-violent communication into their community- how to have conflict without abuse or pushing all the buttons.there are methods of communication that can be used to diffuse conflict.Question: have you floated that to the community? members are unlikely to say they arenot a good communicator. Have tended to try to teach by example.people mimic, so maybe theyll mimic the taking of the trainingCommunity guidelines, rules and expectations that are user-facing as opposed to thelegaleseThou Shalt vs Thou Shalt NotJamie Wales of wikipedia created high-level principles, and then the teams developedtheir own.Guidelines were different per region/culture, but the rules were the same. Allows forcultural differences.TechSoup - moderators wanted to change the rules to make them more enforceable.They try to keep the forums and products separate, and avoid letting members sell theirservices/products. So they are really strict on self-promotionhave a back-channel/private forum for the volunteer moderators to discuss issues, andrecently made a change base don what they said.have anyone used a mentor program to keep new members successful? WebMD had abuddy-to-buddy weight loss program, all volunteer - just created a place for them to doit. Smoking cessation was another.Any additional functionality? no, just a forum - though they would have liked to do more.
    • Status and badges for reputation can assist with promoting good behavior andleadership.Private messaging through backchannel let moderators talk people down and coachthem into better behavior. Talks some of the heat out of it.Set up guiding principles were equally important for internal teams, and be very explicitabout that, and used those principles to make big decisions.Peer recognition was good, spotlights to feature content of interest, leader boards ongood content, others will emulate that. also improves quality of the community. But itdepends on what motivates the people in your community. Counter-example: parents ofkids with disabilities. Mentioned there is a core group that contributes the most - 10%,members said they didnt want ot be in that group (and it was all of the 105 who weresaying this). other counter example: Welcoming community. Since the first impression isthe one that lasts, wanted to make that good. made a complicated system for membersto join, one person came in and said - why dont you make it really simple, givingmembers a badge. it allowed more people in the community to participate. avoidedmaking cliques and made it more distributed. What motivates people is what isimportant.Point systems can provide unintended consequences. Make sure it is for the behaviorsthat you want to encourage.Rep club in a tech forum, gave a new dimension to the community. Also leverage themoderators to help supply rewards. And give rewards to the moderators staff.tangible rewards are not effective, unless they are associated with increased access orrecognition. When community mangers provided tangible rewards (gift cards, discounts,free software) the superusers overwhelming responded with “I appreciate it, but that’snot why I’m doing this”."Currency of leadership is access and trust" - Scott Moore
    • Open Space Fourth Session Topics
    • Accelerating Collective Intelligence Scoring (4A)Convener: Rich ReaderNotes-taker(s): Rich ReaderDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:
    • Super Tools for Super Users (4D)Convener: Chas Warner, LithiumNote-taker: Carole McManus, Platform AssociatesOther Members:Jim Weldon, SourceN Robb Miller, KickAppsJohn Summers, NetApp Michael Rosenthal, InfieldGail Williams, Salon Gam Dias, Overtone.comCindy Starks, HP Karen McAdams, KM Web ProductionHeather Rodde, Google Tim Knight, Clear CapitalKey Understandings/ObservationsThis was more of a "Wish List" session, with participants tossing out ideas of toolstheyd like to have. Is it possible to meet the objectives below with existing tools or toolsin development? Is Google Wave the answer to all our problems? • Most are using Google Analytics to track traffic. We want an easier way to get to the more granular information about individual URLs. • Community Managers want to know how to find the high quality content. Is there a quantitative way to get that information? • Engagement metrics: are potential customers participating, downloading content, white papers, etc.? Related to: Tracking monetization • Looking for better ways to track patterns of behavior: question answerers, discussion leaders, eloquent vs. not • Most of us would like a Master Social Media Dashboard-- what is going on in all social media outlets? • The best knowledge base tools would de-duplicate existing information, and would be smart enough to give you similar content even if you misspelled something or worded a query "wrong" • Tools for Power users: Access to special content, incentives/recognition, filter out ads • Reputation systems: should be positive (e.g. "Thumbs up") only • Allow users to authenticate and participate across multiple communitiesSession NotesLooking for shortcomings of existing tools, dreams for tools thatDashboard for MetricsKey Performance Indicator predictorsCan I discern where my community is going?CEO: what does the community do for our biz?
    • PR substituteIntegrate with CRM web tracking, etc.Bubble up for community mgr, what is high quality?Sentiment extraction—how do you pull that out of the community?Pulling details, granularity from Google Analytics on individual URLsDetails about conversationsMain site vs. communityTie-ins to sales/businessAre they downloading marketing info/whitepapers—otherwise engaged?EloquaTrack patterns of behaviorUsers who answer questionsAre they eloquent as well as helpful?Symantic toolsMaster Social Media feed toolGoogle API/Yahoo PipesBlog – Twitter – retweetManaging multiple personas across many systemsPush with contextGoogle WaveTwitter searchSalesforce integration – tracking monetizationUse forum or community app as a front end for SalesforceStellant -- integrate info into Knowledge BaseIntegrating customer service, developers, customer baseSuper Users create value -- how can you help them?De-dupe questionsYahoo AnswersKB often is not intelligent enough to give you similar info if you word it wrongIncentivizing power usersbringing them onsite, giving them access to developers
    • Super users blog and create tons of content around the visitKB: make it drop-dead easyGet rid of Ads for power users-- filter outCool toolbarsPeople want to feel that theyre not just given tools, but get help to understandRecognitions -- de-automate, put more control into community managers handsSuper users, hall of fameBadge, reputationPrivate messagesSpot rewardsReputation systemsThumbs down -- very negative, very abused featurePositives only...How do we bridge different communities for different reasonsHow to authenticate, how to post across different communitiesUser model-- bring powerful systems togetherVideo--YouTube not appropriate for Internal videoPay svcs-- associated costs are very highTraining videosKickApps upload video to your private area
    • Mission Aligned Twittering (4E)Convener: @socialedgeDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Basic topics and top 10 ways to use Twitter described in more detail here:http://www.socialedge.org/blogs/the-edge/archive/2009/05/04/twitter-and-the-social-entrepreneurDont use Twitter just for marketing or Pr - align with your organization objectives. Makeit part of your programs, and let whole organization leverage it (rather than silodapproach).Keys are listening and learning and discovering key influencers and information in yourfield.Overview: 10 ways to use twitter:NetworkingKnowledgeResearchEducatingIncreasing AwarenessFilteringEvents/conference converageFundraisingAnnouncementsFriendraisingTips and Tools:finding people and subjects (search by keyword, hashtag, or name) search.twitter.comtwitterfall.com tweepsearch.com mrtweet.comunderstanding your twitter community quantify growth: twittercounter.com tag cloudfrom followers bios: twittersheep.commapping your followers: pipes.yahoo.com/mmmeeja/twitterfriends tweemap.comtracking and url shorteners - http://bit.lyalerts monittor.com and tweetbeep.comclustering on issues besides hashtags - twitter groups and twibes.com (there is atwibes.com/socialentrepreneurship)Also talked about: • having two twitter accounts - personal and professional - the latter being mission focused, yet still personal
    • • who to follow - still unclear - reciprocal nature =follow everyone who follows you versus selective - provide a filter for others seeking info on who to follow in your field can look at your very selective list. • having the CEO twitter - often people will have more followers than orgs esp if it is the CEO - people like having a direct channel to leadership • twitter has a timely component - being the first to share information, sharing deadlines, etc. • twitter has a perishability - comments are generally gone within 24 hours. If you retweet - wait ~8 hours, try to include an update or additional info • twitter content should not be vague - Please no "Ive updated my blog" comments (thats what RSS is for) - instead choose a key learning or message from the new post and then link to the post (saying it is new doesnt help anyone, and really is a given on Twitter) • listening on Twitter can result in responding to reporter inquiries and getting mentioned in articles (reporters using Twitter for quick research) • Zappos uses Twitter well and rewards staff NOT on the sale but on the lifetime value of the customer - so quick responses, resolving issues even if there are returns adds to lifetime value. Community and twitter relationship can add to lifetime value of a donor.Mashable was recommended for lists on how to Twitter (and how not to Twitter)
    • Moving Beyond Metrics to ROI (4F)Convener: Mike RowlandNotes-taker(s): Brenna RobertsonOther Members:Dave Wade Jordan WilliamsMichael Sharma Bryan PersonJohn Moore Daphne RochaRon Leichty Mary WalkerMyrna Rivera Lily WongPaul Ardoin Jay MacIntoshBrenna Robertson Becky HerndonChristina Lin Christine TranHeather Forsythe Garett EngleNikki PavaDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Have to first identify what the economic Value: (Dont confuse traffic or behavior metricswith value) • Cost Avoidance • Increased subscription • More frequent purchase • Higher Purchase level/amts • Faster close • Lead generation cost3 buckets to look at communities: • Traffic - PV, visits, visitors, etc. • Behavior - What they do when the get there, who they are, download/visit, contribution/member, responses by goog vs. customers • Value - can attach an economic value to it. Need $ to get to a true ROI model. See above list.Have to build relationships w/ the folks in your company. Need access to other systems.You cannot build ROI from community analytics provided by software vendorsROI Frameworks: • Cost Avoidance
    • o The person who proposes the question needs to verify the answer. This is a feature needed in the platform. o # of community support resolutions X $ complimentary support resolution (1-800 number) = total cost avoidance -> economic value o Track over set period of time (e.g. quarterly or yearly) o ROI = (total economic value - total costs - like cost to set up forum) / total cost --> over one period and as a percentage • Increased subscription o Customer database compared to community database o cust. database = Average churn rate (e.g. the number of months the avg user subscribes) X price/subscription = customer value o Community database - look at active members and see if the churn rate is better or worse. o Price will be the same, so youll have to see if the churn rate was more or less.If subscriptions are longer, than you have a higher customer value for communitymembers.Shows you slowed the churn rate down. • More frequent purchase or Higher Purchase level/amts o eCommerce DB o What is the avg amt customers spend/purchase? o go back to comm DB and parce out active members and compare to ecommerce DB (which ones spend more/purchase?) o Do comm members have a higher spend/purchase? active comm users X avg $ they spend = economic value o Need to trend this and see how it fluctuates. o what is the average number of items in completed shopping activity? (e.g. 1.6 items) Do comm members buy more? o Avg cost/item X avg # items = economic value • CRM decrease cost o Want to find what avg value of customer is • Faster close of sale (Good for large purchases like software or hardware systems) o How fast are organizations moving through your CRM system to sale? o Identify active organizations in community DB to compare them to avg organizations. o How long does it take the avg. organization to go through sale stages? Whats the cost/sale? Do active organizations in your community go through more quickly and spend more? • Lead generation cost o Similar to above, but use cost to generate a lead for average customer versus those which originate in community/social media campaigns
    • How can you tell if a user came to your comm and then bought your product through a3rd party reseller? You cant.Users of support communities become brand neutral after their issue becomesresolved.Hidden costs of community for ROI Analysis, make sure you count these: • Servers • development costs • customizations • widgets • maintenanceParticipate.com whitepaper by Joe Cothrel - Return on community investments" -->http://www.onlinecommunityreport.com/images/presentations/Business_Forum_ROI_final.pdf
    • Changing Platforms and Vendors (4G)Convener: Bill JohnstonDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:DRIVERS1) Tech failure (just stops working)2) Performance3) Integration (with corp site or other tech solutions inplace)4) Vendor support5) flexibility and ability to add features6) vendor relationship (esp support pricing)7) Angst/spite8) management change9) licensing pricing10) Bright shiny object syndrome11) Acquisition12) Legacy CMS13) OwnershipTRYING TO WORK IT OUT WITH THE VENDORexpectations setting and managing themvendor providing historical data to back up decisionsKEY CONSIDERATIONSbuild vs. buytechnologyhosted vs. in housefeaturesdata retentionchange managementusabilityuser status/rep pointsinternal resourcesgap analysis (core vs. extra 20%)analyticsmoderationavailable product roadmapwhat does success look like?HOW TO SOURCE1) Quick, initial specing of feature set, interface, etc.2) engage existing community (power users)
    • 3) dynamic data mappingcheck out Matthew Lees report on white label community platform
    • Purposeful Communities (4H)Convener: Linda Sharp and Bill JacobsonOther Attendees:Scott Moore Delia SantiagoEstee Solomon Gray Jaysie McLinnDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Purpose1. Share projects that bring spiritual, ecological, economic, and social vitality tocommunity2. Discuss how to invigorate existing communities with more purpose3. Explore how a communitys purpose(s) and funding sources drive the methods andtools needed to make it workDiscussionLinda and Bill shared community projects they are working on • Calling Back the Salmon--to bring together a community, local and global, to help salmon return to their indigenous watersheds • Customer Relationship Intelligence (CRI) Community--to evangelize and collaborate on a new way to measure and manage sales and marketing by measuring and managing the relationship, tied to profit • A Potential Business Services Community--to help community members keep on a program/path • World Peace Garden--to foster peace and understanding, starting by inviting people around the world to share what is beautiful to them in nature and how it inspires them as a way to start the conversation Estee has a long history of developing successful communities, particularly in the non-profit (?) world. She made the point that pre-Internet all communities had to have apurpose to get the necessary funding. She also pointed out the importance of beingable to map the relationships of the people in the network to each other. And she posedthe question: "Is it the community or is it the network?"Delia was interested in getting the people in her scientific community more involved inthe local physical community. What USC is doing to involve their researchers in theirlocal community was pointed to as an example. At USC researchers are givensomething like 5% of their time to apply their science to community issues.
    • Jaysie cared about bringing more of a community feeling to the community she is doingfor Picasa, while still keeping the community self-sustaining. Taking from the WorldPeace Garden themes, Linda suggested posing a question to the photographers in thecommunity like "What is beautiful?" Jaysie related that to the question posed on Twitter,but having the community answer with a photo post. Scott related the importance ofbeing clear with the community that it is to be self sustaining and let them do it.Scott noted that the purpose ought to drive the methods and tools, not the other wayaround, which is sometimes the case.Linda and Bill shared how the purposes and funding sources of their communities drivethe methods and tools. The tables they prepared can be a useful guide for establishingthe strategic importance of communities and priority for funding.In the table youll find 12 strategic purposes for communities, 7 funding sources (thesubscription model was a new idea from the unconference, Will Bunkers idea?), and awishlist of 29 methods and tools broken up into Part One: Participation, Collaboration;Part Two: Management; Part Three: Events and an Information Archive. Please findthem in the following files--sorry so many, but necessary to keep within the size limit :)Purposeful Communities Purposes Checklist.docPurposeful Communities Funding Checklist.docPurposeful Communities Methods-Tools Checklist Part One.docPurposeful Communities Methods-Tools Checklist Part Two.docPurposeful Communities Methods-Tools Checklist Part Three.doc
    • Twitter for Dummies by two Twitter dummies (4I)Convener: Betsy Burroughs and Charlotte ZOther Members:Carl Watson Thomas KnollLynn Steffens Zoya FallahNaveet Grewal Angie RyanFrankie Callahan John YamasakiHellene Biante Heather WongPatricia Harris- Braun Hal BryanW. Norwood Debbie DembeckiDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Best to start by identifying a few people to follow. Look to see who follows that personand review previous tweetsWefollow is a good place to look for others who might be good for you to followSearch.twitter.com is a good twitter search engine.Can do RSS for specific search terms, not all those tweets are searched by google sothis is twitter specific.Big question is how to actually use it.Direct messaging is good but doesn’t benefit the entire group with the answers toquestionsTweetdeck is a favorite application to manage Twitter accounts, groups, etc as isSeesmicTwitterverse by Brian Solis is a great overview of all Twitter appshttp://www.briansolis.com/2009/05/gazing-into-twitterverse.htmltwitterstalker allows you follow people without their permissionqwitter allows you to find out who is unfollowing you. http://useqwitter.com/companies/brands and people both use twitter.Don’t recommend saying anything negative about competitors
    • If you’re going to use Twitter to really support a community you have to love to do it.have to be careful with how you reply; don’t forget that it’s all publicHashtags: can be helpful but don’t overuse itNot all people use twitter to complain about customer service but not all expect ananswer.What is purpose of retweet (RT): just like telling a friend about something interestingand giving that person the credit.If you are writing something you expect might be RT, only use 120 charactersMicrosyntax.org is a site to stay current on twitter language and abbreviationsURL shortening sites allow you to use highly customized URLs for tracking messagesand responsesYou can delete your own tweets but often those don’t go away from other apps.Assume it’s in the public domain forever.Tweetups are just meetings organized by twitterOften makes sense to have separate accounts for products/brands and individuals.
    • The Future of Distributed vs Closed Communities (4K)Convener: Chip RobertsonNotes-taker(s): Mike Rafko, Toolbox.comOther Members:Aaron Favara, West Corp Mike Rafko, Toolbox.comJenna Woodul, LiveWorld Mike Sitrin, Plum.comJessica Margolin, The Groupery Ray Eisenberg, AutodeskKrys Freeman, Sustainable Life Media Susan Tenby, TechSoupLauren Klein, Executive Networks Tiffany von Emmel, DreamfishMarc Dangeard, BlueKiwi-Software Ganesha BhaskaraDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: • What is Distributed vs. Closed? Its a hybrid description for "distributed vs centralized" and "open vs. closed". Another term for "closed" is a "walled garden". Some describe Facebook as a walled garden but some could argue that Facebook is part of an emerging distributed social network. A social network hosted by a company for a particular class of customers would be an example of a "closed" network. • Autodesk has 20 communities: 1 SMM members in 20 communities plus yahoo groups. • communities that you control (e.g. companys) and ones you do not control - should you manage them? Can you "manage" them or can we really only "engage" with them? • What is the natural evolution of social networks? Will it follow the same path from centralized to distributed that computing took in the 1980s? Similarly, networks went from a loose collection of disjoint and disparate networks to one integrated inter-network unified over a set of common protocols? Will social networks follow a similar evolutionary path? • One cannot manage to speak on all the networks where presence is possible or even necessary. Utilize distributed authority - provide "evangelists" the information and power to speak on your behalf. • Closed networks can be more conducive to hosting a conversation; The same could be achieved in an open network if one has the means and intention to do it. • eCairn is a site that allows for "blogosphere asset management". • Plum - a closed system, divided by groups. Conversation happens within the group. Small groups have all members active because they are comfortable in smaller groups. Its the strength of the relationships that makes it work. By nature it becomes/stays very topical. • Facebook Family Tree is an example of an application in an "open" network that enables only conversation with family members.
    • • SAP has a very effective closed community for a select community of high-level, high-power users which also seems to be thriving.• Need to distinguish between inbound vs outbound messaging. Is the focus on public relations and risk management or asset building? There is value in each.• Can we get to a "universal profile" where we provide only select pieces of information to particular types of networks? Will networks begin to cluster together in some fashion? What about standalone networks? Can we manage multiple personas across the various networks? An "onion" was presented as one way at looking at managing ones identity in world of social networks - each layer provides deeper insight at the person in the core.• Relationships in open networks could be managed at the inter-personal level - allowing each person to decide which set of attributes they reveal to the other based on context (e.g., this session, this conference, a network, personal, etc).• We need to be careful about tying networks and relationships together. The type of content posted should map to only the appropriate networks (e..g. configuring Twitter to automatically forward to Facebook but there are two status updates). Some people use the networks for different purposes (e.g. Twitter and Facebook) Twitter is often based on contemporary relationships and we dont know necessarily who is following us; Facebook, on the other hand, is built on a long history of friendships. The two worlds may not have the same interests.• Twitter could be viewed primarily as an information feed and a real time sensing medium to listen to what customers may be saying. One person, for example, chooses not to follow anyone who is following more than 1000 people. For another, its not the number of followers that matters but the quality of the information shared -- look for "mavens" who can act as a first-pass filter.• We need to look at "open vs. closed" in terms of "technology platforms" and "relationships". When we are talking about open versus closed, are we referring to the technology platform (e.g. can platforms interoperate and share information) or the relationships (e.g. how people control access and share their information). We could argue that the technology may become more open allowing for distributing social media functions across platforms while some human networks and relationships will naturally remain closed to protect and facilitate their stated intent.• Can we "manage" distributed communities or are we really just shepherding them? What is shepherding? Suggestion: one monitors on a regular basis and provide input to make sure the conversation goes the right way. Is that just semantics? Isnt "shepherding" really a lighter touch than "managing" which can come across as heavy handed.• We not only want to dissuade and diffuse negative behavior but we also want to reinforce and encourage positive behavior in our social networks. Negative does not equate to proactive.• One can use tools like Radian6 to identify conversations where and people who one might want to engage.• ThinkStudies.com (VERIFY) is a tool that can help one build relationship matrices from social networks.
    • Key Takeaways from the session 1. Stratification - Important to distinguish between technology vs relationships when talking about open vs. closed and distributed vs. centralized. 2. There are applications for both open and closed networks. 3. Virtually distributed networks are out there and will keep coming - we have to find ways to deal with them; 4. There is a comprehensive synergy in careful utilization of both open and closed networks.New Hashtag for this topic on Twitter: #distcomm
    • Open Space Fifth Session Topics
    • Community Driven Product Design- Collecting Feedbackfrom your Community: Scale, Sustainable Fun (5A)Convener: Siko BouterslNotes-taker(s): Christina LimOther Members:Terri Peluso Lori AndersonChris Bailey Ajay RamachandranChristina Lin Katherine KornasCindy Starks Delia SantiagoSarah Hobbs Garth LewisJeremy LatimerDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:What are the best ways to build systems that collect feedback?Question to think about: Are you trying to provide forum for customer self-service ortrying to structure high quality feedback into the backend feedbackGrace schools: We email power-users wireframes and they send feedback via theforum with regard to their thoughts on parenting and schools.Jeremy Latimer (Impact Workforce):Q: How do you scale qualitative feedback and have that compete with quantitative data.How can 10 people stand up to the thousands of usability points? • You can only set the expectations that we may not act on the feedback. • All of Blogger engineers are now on Twitter. Must tie back the feedback loop.Q; Has anyone put a survey in the forum and get nothing back? • Surveys in the forum that are too long might not be very effectiveQ; how do you judge a good survey?- Garth Lewis (MSFT). It returns actionable results- People with feedback tends to have complaints. Recruiting is a really important interms of getting the right audience. You can have different response rates in differentarenas.Q: Are you guys extracting sentiments? Keyword extraction?- A few years ago, there was a study to measure health of the forums (automatically) to
    • gauge the responses. There’s a lot of work going on.- Seems that you need more robust techniques to combine these automatically collectquantitative data with the qualitative data.Q: Why not build a product for beginners and advanced users?- Firefox has tips and tricks for the beginner, medium user and advanced user- One approach is to have Google keeps things simple but is very powerful & fast.- For Adwords, making the tools simpler hasn’t been the answer because there are somany different types of people using the product. • Apply insights on feedback that fits with the business objective.Q: Is anybody using a feedback platform suc as Dell Ideastorm?- Ajay: We made one called “Accept (Except?) Software” A lot of companies don’t makethe backend process transparent. If you want to collect feedback you must let themknow what’s going to happen to their idea. This platform allows you to gain followersand it bubbles up. The challenge is you’re self-selecting a group of people- Allow the user to tag escalated bugs in the forum.- The ideal platform should be able to sort several ways. i.e. sort by recent date, TopContributor’s idea, relevancy.- Using currency: You have $100 bucks and you can invest in an idea.Q: has anyone mobilized the 1% from the less talkative? • The poweruser has some admin power to give feedback to the team. • Matt: Private forum where developers meet the users. A term limit would be good.Q: Does anyone have forums for pre-teens? • Matt: @Yahoo! There was IM product for teens. Created a private forum that allows the kids to see mock-ups and get their thoughts. • Idea: Micro-survey. An activity based survey that’s not given to the user all in one shot, but rather over time after they’ve done an action. i.e. Filled out the profile.
    • Are We a Community Too? (5E)Convener: Gail Ann Williams & Scott MooreNotes-taker(s): Daphne RochaDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:What is going on?Professional Organization(www.community-roundtable.com)membership-based - $750-$1k/yrno vendorstwitter: @thecrOnline Community Research Network(www.onlinecommunityresearch.com)Membership-based - $795 / yr (w/ group licensing available)twitter: @ocreportOnline Conferences – No traditional forum or follow up Yahoo groups – onlinefacilitation Friendfeed groups Connie Bernson facebook group Linkedin groups –spammy #cmtychat – FridaysWhat do we want? • Thoughtful writing by our community experts • - how do you tap into the expertise? (curation) • really good and complete Q&A of the 200 most asked questionswith good thoughtful answers – similar to an FAQ to reference to fromexperts/practitioner • easy access of Forms/templates/surveys of what’s been and howit worked – something lightweight to make it helpful to engage. • Community support among community managers – areas to helpproblem solve, peer venting. • Journals/publications – journal of community (i.e.”First Monday”, Jerry Michelski, podcast/talk shows • Book • Readwriteweb
    • • ID community aggregate blog • Community Management group through Linked in – spammy • “Social media super phantom” planet - aggregationEncourage attendees to write a blog topic: “Big Aha from this OCU2009?” and use as aconversation starter to test the concept but importantly get the involvement started oftrying to aggregate the information (tag)
    • How To Mobilize Brand Advocates (5F)Convener: Heather Forsythe and Rachel WeidingerNotes-taker(s): Heather ForsytheDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:DO ANY OF YOU HAVE “SUPER USERS” IDENTIFIED IN YOUR COMMUNITY?HOW DO YOU USE THEM?WikiHow: Lots of super users. An admin status; you have to reach a hurdle to get extrapowers.Tech Soup: We have super users helping us moderate our super forum. The ones thatare the best we give them access to a private forum and give them admin privleges,then after several years, we give them a stipend of $150….only 10-12.AWARE OF ANY TOOLS TO IDENTIFY/MOBILIZE BRAND ADVOCATES?PayCycle: Zuberance does. I researched them while at SanDisk. Their platform helpsyou identify brand advocates AND provide tools to help them spread the word abouttheir thoughts on your products/service.DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY ACTIVE ADVOCATE PROGRAMS/COMMUNITIES?Autodesk: Has a student ambassador program . Brand ambassadors drive awarenessof free products available online for students. We are trying to promote usage oncampus. We recruited the brand ambassadors on campus. We do incentivize themwith Visa gift cards, but that’s not why they do it. They want the product education wegive them. We train our uber-users to help them influence their departments at schoolto use the product.Nokia: Forum Nokia only supports developers, not product users, so our advocates arethose that help others. We set up 100 champions – about 60 from the community. Wereward them with insider information, free admittance to trade shows, and free hotel andflights for some of those. This builds networking between the champions as well asbetween champions and Nokia.WHAT OTHER WAYS TO YOU INCENT/REWARD ADVOCATES/UBER-USERS TOSPREAD THE WORD? - Insider info - BETA testing of products - Free admission to trade shows - Access (to people at the company) - Travel - Personal reward - Gift cards - Acknowledgement - Call them! - Recognition as ‘expert’ – ie, LindedIn expert rating for questions answered
    • - WhikiHow: New article boost. When you use this feature, all results of your edit shows up in the feed. Helps you edit articles quicker, which can help you build credibility. - NOKIA: on our discussions we have levels with more power and better title with each level - Not sure you NEED to offer an incentive IF you identify the people who are really passionate about your brand/product/service. - Watch Ted Talk by Barry Schwatz: “Incentives are BAD.” - There’s a difference between incentive for behavior vs. rewarding/thanking them afterwards - Give them a reason to feel good - GIVE THEM PRIVLEDGES - info first, then voice/input - give them tools to enable their evangelism (widget to show they are ebay sellers), - status (feedback scores, title “evangelist”) giving them a collective impact measurement tool - offline events - Badges with their feedback rating - Profiling them in the media. - Autodesk: People have no idea that student reps are incentivized. Once we posted the names on facebook, we got a flood of questions about ‘how to become a rep’? JUST FLAGGING our reps created an influx of applications.HOW DO YOU IDENTIFY PEOPLE WHO ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT YOURBRAND/PRODUCT/SERVICE? - LISTEN and search online: twitter, blog posts, forums, etc. - Drive people to a survey and ask: - (1) How likely are you to recommend this brand/product/service to a friend, on a scale of 1-10 - (2) How active are you in social media, on a scale of 1-10? Do you have a LinkedIn/Twitter/Facebook account? - Then…talk to the people who scored high on BOTH questions.ANY TIPS AND LESSONS LEARNED FROM COMMUNITY/BRAND ADVOCATEPROGRAMS?• TechSoup: We’ve learned we need to share more, and share more quickly.• Include on their online profiles what other networks they are part of.• Need to be transparent• When you use incentives, it’s important to use on-brand, on-mission incentivesHOW CAN YOU HAVE ANY “CONTROL” OF YOUR COMMUNITY – esp. w/r/tnegative feedback? - You’re going to get bad feedback. If you do, you need to react to it. - You mobilize them in a direction you don’t intend. - EARN loyalty. Listen to them and react to them and you can turn them.
    • -Community polices itself and you’re in a much better position. -Community in 2nd life is very volatile. They feel a lot of ownership. -You’ve done your job in user loyalty when you don’t have to go in and defend anything b/c there are others defending you outside of your organization.HOW DO YOU MODERATE? - TechSoup: I am a strong moderator. I have weekly meeting. I set agenda for the meeting. The rest of the time I let them deal with it. It’s a distributed community, with second life, google group, twitter. Only when I’m there will I chime in. I don’t participate in side discussions.
    • What and How to Measure Engagement (5I)Convener: Charlotte ZiemsNotes-taker(s): Christine TranDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:How are we measuring engagement and does it mean different things in differentcommunities? - For us, it’s about return visits, since we’re not a sales customers - Content creation o # of blog posts o Pictures uploaded o Comments - Content consumption o Time on sites o Return visits o Downloads o Sharing/invitingWhat about engagement on Twitter or Facebook? Is it# of followers, friends ormentions?What about negative engagement? Does that count? How do you distinguish?How to measure blog posts or comments? Get it out of your system. Developers build ascript to pull it out of the database.How often do you ask your developers to do this kind of thing? Busy lately, but usuallyonce a month. A lot of times building the script once, it’s easy to do it again.Measuring ROI on building a community. That sounds passive to me. Must have apurposeful campaign on your part as a business and measure how effective thatcampaign is. How can you measure ROI if you don’t have a monetization strategy?Advertising not appropriate within the community, but its okay to market depending oncontext and how you do it.How do you measure investment?What do executives want to see? I’ve seen that they want to see the same reports theysee from everyone else, like Net Promotor Score a marketing formula not things likedownloads, page views, etc.
    • If you survey your community, depends on sample size and response rate, but 300 isoften a number cited as minimum viable sample size.Marketing is the new finance, lots of people struggling ROI.
    • Using Online Communities for Customer Support (5L)Convener: Waladeen NorwoodDiscussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and,if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:Companies represented with support sites:-HP-Google-REI-SymantecWhat is the standard engagement level?-It depends on the goal of the community-Measure how long does it take to get a first response-Measure how many less phone calls you divertSuper users-Top contributors-few to many reach-give feedback-have access to private forum – get info before everyone else-issue: have to worry about super user leaving forum and staring community—find away to keep them engageTwitterone to many tool*for big time problems, but not for small problems*you have to love twittering*you can put Twitter feeds on your home page, but the problem tweeted many onlyeffect only 2% of customers – do you want to host a problem that does not effect 98% ofcustomers*can use tweet deck to monitor product*Have you handcuffed yourself to respond on Twitter –direct user to company site orzendeck.com, rightnow.com, etc.*user expectations on Twitter low because tweets only 140 characters*If company has a presence on twitter, the users expect an answer and can you meetthat expectation long term;*but if company has no outward presence, users will be pleasantly surprised when thecompany reaches out to them because the intent of the tweet was just to rant.*Twitter mainly used by companies for marketing --new product announcement ORsupport –“how can we help you”
    • “Tweet Clouds” – see words related to products*twitter is a good triage point – let me help you get to the right person -can useicrossing.com services to watch your company’s name being mentioned on other sitesTwitter Support Industry Benchmarks-Comcast Cares – Frank on twitter-Zappos – Tony on twitter-does your compnay want to have one user handling support? –there may be an issuewith one person having this much power—what if they leaveFacebook-people want to know your listening-people use facebook for personal reasons – they do not go there for business – that iswhat linkedin is forKnowledgebase-provide ratings for discussion topics and after a certain amount of ratings then promoteto knowledgebase-combine all answers from call centers, forums, etc. into one knowledgebaseWki-repository of user generated contentSites/Tools:google.com/analytics/www.google.com/alertswww.Help.comwww.Tweetdeck.comwww.Zendesk.comwww.Rightnow.comwww.Fixya.comwww.notify.me