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Online Community Unconference:
Book of Proceedings
Held June 10, 2009 in Mountain View, CA
Notes gathered and compiled by ...
Executive Summary
We had an amazing day at the Online Community Unconference yesterday. Over 220
people attended the event...
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................5
...
OPEN SPACE FOURTH SESSION TOPICS............................................93
ACCELERATING COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE SCORIN...
Introduction
June 29, 2009 | Sonoma, CA
Dear Reader,
Our intention in continuing to host the Online Community Unconference...
Bill Johnston welcoming
the crowd during
opening remarks.
A glance at the
Agenda in between
sessions
Jim Cashel assisting ...
Open Space First Session Topics
Morning conversations over coffee anticipating the start of the Online Community
Unconfere...
How to Defend the Value of Your Communities: ROI (1A)
Convener: Jim Weldon, @jimwsourcen
Notes-taker(s): Christine Tran
Ot...
To figure out your ROI:
Know what the point of your community is
Look at behavioral – what are people doing in your commun...
Managing the Mob- When Things Go Wrong (1B)
Convener: Melissa Daniel
Notes-taker(s): Valerie Kameya
Other Members:
Marilyn...
webprofile.blog.com
Staff- Y! dark grey background for staff comments so users can scan, see that Y! employees
are respond...
read deeper into report.
MD Yahoo uses words- frustrated. #s subjective- Words engage ppl, more broadly understood.
Q: How...
Scott Moore- when worked for nonprofit, set org principles up front to set expectation. Modified
over time.
Diff to manage...
How To Manage Multiple Personalities (1C)
Convener: Chip Roberson, ClickMarkets chip@clickmarkets.net
Notes-taker(s): Jays...
hear your thoughts.
Thanks again for your participating in this session. I found it stimulating and informative.
Chip Robe...
Q: How can I keep multiple platforms updated?
A: http://Ping.fm provides a single interface from which a person can select...
Social CRM (1D)
Convener: Ajay Ramachandran
Notes-taker(s): Scott Dodds
Other Members:
Scott Dodds
Jill Finlayson
Linda Sh...
Mine these conversations to get insights on tone or topics
Today its all manual, you need to automate it and scale.
there ...
Product ideas from the community are also being added to the product - shows
business impact.
Trying to define a customer ...
Key successes of the Netapp community is the relationships they've built - putting out
more information can build respect ...
Online Recommendations (1E)
Convener: Garett Engle
Other Members:
Jim Scott
Carole McManus
Katherine Kornas
Brenna Roberts...
Toolbox.com
Helping people do their job better
Find relevancy
Intriguing content vs. actual helpfulness
Knowledge share
Pe...
Metrics for Measuring Community Health (1F)
Convener: Amber Authier, officialCOMMUNITY
Notes-taker(s): Charlotte Ziems
Dis...
Lots of metrics aggregated together = health. Get Satisfaction has a Satisfactionometer,
which allows users to measure kud...
Can’t you just ask the community if they think the community is healthful? It does work.
NPS = Net Promoter Score = Sentim...
How to Nurture a Thriving Open Source Community in a
Commercial Open Source Context (1G)
Convener: Peter Theony
Other Memb...
Metrics for Measuring Community Health (1H)
Convener: Amber Authier
Note Taker: Charlotte Ziems
Other Members:
Arielle Hof...
o Return visits
o Time spent
Do communities create community?
• Measure specific content and posts to assess problems solv...
Communities their value contributing to business? Measure that with affinity.
How to explain to clients the value of the o...
Value has to be back to a tangible business goal
Attributes of a healthy community:
good info, respect, participant ideas,...
Using Other Social Media Networks to Build Your Community
(1I)
Convener: Janet Fouts
Notes-taker(s): Megan Keane
Other Mem...
• When you go to funder, your Twitter influence score matters; something to think
about for nonprofits looking for funding...
• Importance of aggregation to be able to put it all in one place; users will want to
go to one place for all the best stu...
Recovery.Gov – Myth or reality (1J)
Convener: Claude Whitmyer
Notes-taker(s): Claude Whitmyer
Other Members:
Angela Hey
Fr...
Patriot's express loans for Vets is the easiest small business loans to get. You can
apply directly on SBA.Gov for up to $...
size business since it has an even greater actual impact on the economy than the
Fortune blah blah. AND…these businesses a...
Social Media Virgins (1J)
Convener: Claude Whitmyer
Notes-taker(s): Claude Whitmyer
Discussion notes, key understandings, ...
Open Space Second Session Topics
The Trainwreck that is the Distributed Conversation (2A)
Convener: J.J. Toothman
Notes-taker(s): Delia Santiago
Other Memb...
• Do you want to close the loop at some point? Don’t HAVE to, but there can be a
benefit to it.
• Is this a missing visual...
Strategy and Communities (2B)
Convener: Nolifer Merchant
Notes-taker(s): Valerie Kameya
Other Members:
John Todor
Mike Sit...
-Meetings- tough questions in social media enables employees to ask qs not
comfortable asking in public. everyone cloaked ...
Set clear expectation. Authority, delegation, etc. Don't want to set expectation of
listening to ppl and acting on it. Arg...
Bottoms up approach conversations. Let exec get into the club.
Get participants into the club- use multidimensional taggin...
Using Strategy and Communities (2C)
Convener: Nilofer Merchant
Notes-taker(s): Valerie Kameya
Other Members:
John Todor
Mi...
What can we achieve using social media vs. non sm?
-Meetings- tough questions in social media enables employees to ask qs ...
Set clear expectation. Authority, delegation, etc. Don't want to set expectation of
listening to ppl and acting on it. Arg...
Bottoms up approach conversations. Let exec get into the club.
Get participants into the club- use multidimensional taggin...
Online Publications Community Efforst: What’s Wrong,
What’s Not, What’s Next- Online Publications and Sites of
Print Publi...
Side issue: there are too many communities to join! Google friend connect agrees with
you! This can help publications fold...
How Does Online Community Help Local Businesses
Generate Traffic (2E)
Convener: Buddy Teaster
Notes-taker(s): Carole McMan...
Build presence on social networks, AdSense, etc.
Help biz build a following-- 6 month contract ensures the biz is getting ...
Publicity around the tools creates publicity for the biz
• Twitter in the media
• Facebook trickling up from their kids
Ch...
Generals, Colonels and Community (2F)
Convener: Guy Martin
Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, ob...
Social Media Monitoring (2G)
Convener: Jim Cashel
Notes-taker(s): Tezza Yuijuico
Other Members:
Heather Forsythe
Stephano ...
Best Buy Case Study: BestBuys conversations are broadcasted on monitors in the
Exec’s offices, all of a sudden people HAD ...
Others: andiamo, visible technologies, truecast Problem with heavy volume Measure of
sentiment -- what do you do with the ...
Identifying and Engaging Online Influencers (2H)
Convener: Gam Dias
Notes-taker(s): Paul Ardoin
Other Members:
Dana Nourie...
2. A "tree structure" can reward people for different kinds of activity within the
community, such as "member of the week"...
Big Community: Strategy Across Your Ecosystem (2I)
Convener: Rachel Weidinger
Notes-taker(s): Brenna Robertson, Google
Oth...
• Does presence on Twitter and FB replace community forum?
• Using TW to push out blog posts, and putting things on FB sit...
• Stay on mailing lists. Be able to recommend different resources that exist (not
necessarily yours). Then chime in on lis...
Social Psychology 101 for Community Managers (2J)
Convener: Scott Moore
Notes-taker(s): Scott Moore's Notes on the session...
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Transcript of "BoP from Online Community Unconference 2009"

  1. 1. Online Community Unconference: Book of Proceedings Held June 10, 2009 in Mountain View, CA Notes gathered and compiled by Heidi Nobantu Saul and Zoë Hollister
  2. 2. Executive Summary We had an amazing day at the Online Community Unconference yesterday. Over 220 people attended the event and the agenda included 57 breakout sessions throughout the day on topics including: • Identifying and Engaging with Online Influencers • Social Psychology 101 for Community Managers • W.O.M. Branding - Mobilizing Advocates and Brand Citizenship • Online Community for Social Good/Change (Non Profits, Multiple Stakeholders) • Super Tools for Super Users - Next Generation UI and Technology Brainstorm Most session notes are available via the Unconference wiki: http://www.socialtext.net/ocu2009 Key Blog Posts: My take-away from the Online Community Unconference - Open Business Online Community Unconference 2009- the groupery Back From the Online Community Unconference - Tom Humbarger Back from Online Communities Unconference 2009 - Stefano Maffulli #ocu2009 Community Jobs Wanted - Janet Fouts Reflecting on #IABC09 and #OCU2009 - AudioBoo (Bryan Person) Twitter Streams: #ocu2009 #octribe Pictures: http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=ocu2009
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS: INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................5 OPEN SPACE FIRST SESSION TOPICS ..................................................7 HOW TO DEFEND THE VALUE OF YOUR COMMUNITIES: ROI (1A) .................................................... 8 MANAGING THE MOB- WHEN THINGS GO WRONG (1B) .................................................................10 HOW TO MANAGE MULTIPLE PERSONALITIES (1C)........................................................................14 SOCIAL CRM (1D)......................................................................................................................17 ONLINE RECOMMENDATIONS (1E)................................................................................................21 METRICS FOR MEASURING COMMUNITY HEALTH (1F) ...................................................................23 HOW TO NURTURE A THRIVING OPEN SOURCE COMMUNITY IN A COMMERCIAL OPEN SOURCE CONTEXT (1G) ...........................................................................................................................26 METRICS FOR MEASURING COMMUNITY HEALTH (1H)...................................................................27 USING OTHER SOCIAL MEDIA NETWORKS TO BUILD YOUR COMMUNITY (1I)...................................31 RECOVERY.GOV – MYTH OR REALITY (1J)....................................................................................34 SOCIAL MEDIA VIRGINS (1J)........................................................................................................37 OPEN SPACE SECOND SESSION TOPICS ...........................................38 THE TRAINWRECK THAT IS THE DISTRIBUTED CONVERSATION (2A)................................................39 STRATEGY AND COMMUNITIES (2B) .............................................................................................41 USING STRATEGY AND COMMUNITIES (2C) CONVENER: NILOFER MERCHANT................................45 ONLINE PUBLICATIONS COMMUNITY EFFORST: WHAT’S WRONG, WHAT’S NOT, WHAT’S NEXT- ONLINE PUBLICATIONS AND SITES OF PRINT PUBLICATION (2D).....................................................49 HOW DOES ONLINE COMMUNITY HELP LOCAL BUSINESSES GENERATE TRAFFIC (2E) ....................51 GENERALS, COLONELS AND COMMUNITY (2F) ..............................................................................54 SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING (2G)................................................................................................55 IDENTIFYING AND ENGAGING ONLINE INFLUENCERS (2H) ..............................................................58 BIG COMMUNITY: STRATEGY ACROSS YOUR ECOSYSTEM (2I).......................................................60 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 101 FOR COMMUNITY MANAGERS (2J)........................................................63 SELECTING THE RIGHT COMMUNITY PLATFORM (2L).....................................................................70 OPEN SPACE THIRD SESSION TOPICS................................................72 W.O.M. BRANDING (3B)..............................................................................................................73 COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS FOR COMMUNITY MANAGERS (HOW TO EFFECTIVELY BE AN ADVOCATE FOR USERS AND YOUR COMPANY) (3D) ...............................................................................................75 IF YOU BUILD IT THEY WILL COME. NOT. TIPS AND TRICKS FOR GROWING COMMUNITY (3E).............77 B2B COMMUNITIES - WHAT WORKS, BEST PRACTICES FROM THE PAST 10 YEARS OF B2B COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT (3F)..................................................................................................79 HOW TO ENGAGE COMMUNITIES OUTSIDE OF TRADITIONAL DISCUSSION BOARDS (3G) ..................81 ONLINE COMMUNITY FOR SOCIAL GOOD AND CHANGE (3H) ..........................................................82 SOCIAL NETWORK SOCIOLOGY ANALYSIS (3J)..............................................................................87 WHAT IS COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP? (3K).....................................................................................89
  4. 4. OPEN SPACE FOURTH SESSION TOPICS............................................93 ACCELERATING COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE SCORING (4A) ...........................................................94 SUPER TOOLS FOR SUPER USERS (4D) .......................................................................................95 MISSION ALIGNED TWITTERING (4E)........................................................................................98 MOVING BEYOND METRICS TO ROI (4F) ....................................................................................100 CHANGING PLATFORMS AND VENDORS (4G) ..............................................................................103 PURPOSEFUL COMMUNITIES (4H)..............................................................................................105 TWITTER FOR DUMMIES BY TWO TWITTER DUMMIES (4I)..............................................................107 THE FUTURE OF DISTRIBUTED VS CLOSED COMMUNITIES (4K) ....................................................109 OPEN SPACE FIFTH SESSION TOPICS ..............................................112 COMMUNITY DRIVEN PRODUCT DESIGN- COLLECTING FEEDBACK FROM YOUR COMMUNITY: SCALE, SUSTAINABLE FUN (5A).............................................................................................................113 ARE WE A COMMUNITY TOO? (5E) ............................................................................................115 WHAT AND HOW TO MEASURE ENGAGEMENT (5I).......................................................................120 USING ONLINE COMMUNITIES FOR CUSTOMER SUPPORT (5L) ....................................................122
  5. 5. Introduction June 29, 2009 | Sonoma, CA Dear Reader, Our intention in continuing to host the Online Community Unconference series is a simple one. We believe that online community and social media professionals represent the best sources of information on creating healthy and sustainable online communities. There is a rich base of largely untapped knowledge in this emergent community of practitioners. Connecting this community, and tapping in to this community’s collective knowledge and real world experience is exactly what we intended to do during the Unconference. Whether you attended and participated in the Online Community Unconference, or are experiencing the Unconference by reading this book of proceedings, I hope you find the content valuable and useful in your day-to-day work. I owe a debt of gratitude to several organizations and individuals for their support, guidance and enthusiasm during the planning phase of the Online Community Unconference. Our Sponsors: • Boonex – http://www.boonex.com • Egret Endeavors - http://www.egretendeavors.com/ • Omnifuse – http://www.omnifuse.com Event Staff: • Event Coordination: Zoë Hollister • Facilitation: Kaliya Hamlin • Newsroom Management & Note Coordination: Heidi Nobantu Saul • Marketing & Promotional Support: Heather Virga I welcome any questions, comments or discussion about the Online Community Unconference, and I wish you success in your community-building efforts. Best, Bill Johnston Chief Community Officer Forum One Networks (415) 299.9638 | bjohnston@forumone.com
  6. 6. Bill Johnston welcoming the crowd during opening remarks. A glance at the Agenda in between sessions Jim Cashel assisting at the Agenda grid.
  7. 7. Open Space First Session Topics Morning conversations over coffee anticipating the start of the Online Community Unconference 2009.
  8. 8. How to Defend the Value of Your Communities: ROI (1A) Convener: Jim Weldon, @jimwsourcen Notes-taker(s): Christine Tran Other Members: Amy Garza Paul Mikolay Alexa Bruce Jen Nestel Rachel Romero Dave Wade Jim Weldon Perrine Crampton Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Questions to Tackle: How do we get money? How do we defend How do you determine the ROI? Implications of downtown and impact on ROI What are the key metrics? How to use them to show value? How to predict the ROI for a new community? What do people want to measure? The single most difficult problem to solve is how to determine ROI and defend community. What is the outcome you want from your community? Google analytics are aiming low; need to dig in more Southwest Airlines measures everything, from how long you wait in line for every process; they track many pieces to get to one ROI: How happy are our customers? We can track 255 metrics for communities, but what is your goal/outcome? What is the behavior of the members in the community? Get your goal first, and then you can build the metrics. Most people let communities run itself, but usually this is a disaster. Yahoo and Google can do this it’s fine. You need to dig deeper o Did they give us an idea that we generated revenue from? o Did they make a recommendation to another customer? Two types of communities: Affinity brands that don’t have to do anything. Then there’s everyone else who has to figure out what to do to engage. o Start with controversial topics to get them going. o Find out what everybody is pissed off about. o Get them there and then figure out what else to do. o Vanilla communities are lame Using tools to figure out what people are doing on an automated basis o In a community, go in and extract what they’re talking about.
  9. 9. To figure out your ROI: Know what the point of your community is Look at behavioral – what are people doing in your community. Dig really deep. It’s really beyond most communities. Have no idea how to prove their value. Figure out the matrix. o Basic rank track stats o Dig into the next piece. What did we want people to do when they were online? Read all the posts Have a tool that pulls it all out for you. Figure out what did they do after that? Look at facilitation – for example, when you were part of a nonprofit and were pulled into doing something you didn’t really want to do. Think like that. This is the key to good community and getting good ROI. If people aren’t coming and posting the right content, then you won’t have any ROI. Moderation – there’s a lot to do to automate. Online communities do a great job of ideation, ask and receiving answers, customer service. Dig into the outcomes of the conversations. Ex. 50 of our largest contributors are leading to % less customer support calls or less calls about basic questions. Perhaps customer support is too vanilla? Senior management must be involved in ROI.
  10. 10. Managing the Mob- When Things Go Wrong (1B) Convener: Melissa Daniel Notes-taker(s): Valerie Kameya Other Members: Marilyn Jaynes Bikramjit Sing Matt Sharp Brieanne Bogart Mary Walker Nilofer Merchant Siko Bouterse Valerie Kameya Lorraine Freeman Christina Lin Adena DeMonte Karoli Kuns Bonnie Ho Dave Kim Kristi Huwerth Carl Watson Scott Moore Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Yahoo 360 shutdown. Launched 6 yrs ago; told transitioning 2 yrs ago. coup. long lead time. transitioning to Yahoo Profiles- solution- letting them help design new product. angry. v. positive- preview modules, Why don't you leave it up? Not fixing bugs, so comm satisfaction less. Peanut butter manifesto. Google it (no, yahoo it!) Finding sticky places for customers that they like. Don't find multiple points to fix-make one big wheel and fix it. 360 not part of a unified profile so it's being killed. Broken and not fitting it. Migration- blog content, comments. Allowed mature content, Yahoo no longer allowing adult content. People leaving for Wordpress where they can talk to about anything. Any Moveable Type content allowed. Oct. 08 launched Profiles. ask comm. What features do you like? preview contacts before accepting? blogging- added. Other requests not doable or worthwhile. Yahoo large co., takes time. Tell people looking at new product, ask for suggestions (look or don't look at it), then when relaunch say "This is what you wanted" Carl Watson Little lead time- time to port- feedback typical churn rate for Churn rate 5% or less. exit survey. what would have made you stay? I know you can spam me or delete this. People feel their opinion heard. Blog- intensive engagement strategy usu respond 40%- when launching 50-60%? reports back to team, not just lip service.
  11. 11. webprofile.blog.com Staff- Y! dark grey background for staff comments so users can scan, see that Y! employees are responding, it's not just users. What do you do when mob is silent? Address ppl individually. keep them safe so ppl hiding will feel safe when they come out and speak- no dogpile on dissenters, supporters. Melissa- alias to protect her work acct Ppl piling on to ppl who say positive things. Quiet ppl will tend to go and post on their blogs, Twitter. Monitor those too MD doesn't do FB but does twitter, blogs Track ppl across the network- use answers, blog, stopped using community...Notice when usage changes, ask them what would bring them back. How leveraging community leaders? Vista client- innovators. early adopter program. Shut down. Comm to Yahoo group that it was shutting down. Asking ppl who were interested in innovating messenger client. Became thought leaders. Help other users- ask Melissa for help rather than customer care- users look smart. Top performers group 40 friends, over 200 messages month. You get a crown Power User. Talk to other power users in group. 90K users. Preview new features. Power users pretty unified in what they're looking for. Yahoo 360: no power user program- a problem. Small group on NDA program 15 users per product. Anyone else can blog or talk about it. Be careful what you say because someone might print it (newspaper). Time mgmt: How much time do you spend managing happy vs. angry users? 70-80% time to boards, emails during a launch. Issues escalated appropriately. Normal time- 30% time 10% post 1% post freq 80-90% post infreq. Focus on those getting word out. Don't worry so much about silent ppl. Tell power users you appreciate them defending your company. Send swag. Do whatever you can. Post on forum- hey, thanks X user. How do you raise this info to management? Report? MD-weekly post- blog entries, unique users, hot topics, new issues, posts, pulling in critical profound or useful comments. Eyelist for every product- weekly distribution, contact me if you have qs. product comm, hybrid comm management role Work w/PR and Mkting, Customer Care teams. Train agents. Users have suggestions. Rachel McCool- eBay-sentiment barometer. scale 1-10. subjective call on their part. Top level for execs. Created expectations for what is normal. Ppl would notice- what's bad this week- and
  12. 12. read deeper into report. MD Yahoo uses words- frustrated. #s subjective- Words engage ppl, more broadly understood. Q: How do you separate your feelings about the site from your comm mgr role? A: Sometimes you agree with user. Let them know you're sympathetic. Mob appreciates it, but higher up execs don't appreciate your not toeing the company line. MD- being neutral is hard. Re-reads emails to make sure emails don't sound terse or bitchy. I understand, this is a great suggestion, I'm right on board with you is still fairly neutral vs. Thanks for the suggestion (flat). Talk to higher ups- you're slightly sympathetic but will agree w/company line. You ARE a user. At some point you become part of the community. Separate out when you're speaking for yourself vs. community. Conflict can bring in traffic. As long as you can manage the conflict. Ways to fairly present both sides. Community guidelines everyone is familiar with. Try not to call out specifically what they said because they add fuel to the fire. Constructive negativity is OK -MD. Ask them to re-edit post to remove profanity. Communities have diff tolerances about conflict. Some love it; some don't. Who are you losing because of the kind of dialogue happening? Has to be some level of conflict or else nothing's going on. Southern culture- nice manners, a seemingly pleasant conversation can be tense. Typical NY in your face style- swearing, forget about it a few mins later. Screamers- MD will put them on moderation after a warning. Their comments appear in yellow. After a week, they learn. Comments hidden on some sites for certain users- causes weird threaded conversations. Some users see some, others don't. Adding Viagra or Cialis to comments auto-screened- other users can't see but not deleted. Diff norms for diff comms. All Yahoo comms follow the general guidelines. Groups allows mature content; profiles and answers don't. Mostly consistent and TOS (terms of service). Brand consistency? Rules same but the way users are communicated with -Flickr vs Profiles is diff.- developer community. Yahoo voice. speak similarly when product launches. Google - Picasa vs blog forums. Diff personalities of forum and shifts over time. Comm leaders' personalities trickle down. Try to leave comm alone and only step in to police occasionally. How do users understand the personality of a forum? MD- a Flickr- notice fun tone, short posts, greeting in mult langs vs. Proflies- neutral for users. Blogs- longer posts, instructional, need to understand features, product, free speech. Is that culture being reflected back to new users? Groups- yes, Shine-yes. Colors, look and feel diff. Have asked users- look at blog, # of comments- level of user engagement. Color of diff products.
  13. 13. Scott Moore- when worked for nonprofit, set org principles up front to set expectation. Modified over time. Diff to manage entry point. MD worked for Nike community- new users had to watch video about LeBron James as part of reg process. But it appealed to their demo and interests.
  14. 14. How To Manage Multiple Personalities (1C) Convener: Chip Roberson, ClickMarkets chip@clickmarkets.net Notes-taker(s): Jaysie McLinn Other Members: Jaysie McLinn Gam Dias, Overtone Chris Bailey, Gravit8 Marketing Paul Ardoin, VisionApp Sarah Hobbs, Google Delia Santiago, NASA Ames Mark Dangeard, BlueKiwi Software Jaysie McLinn, Google Rich Reader, WOM-buzz Alex Parlini, Pew Trusts Michael Mitchell, Independent Daphne Rocha, Consultant, LiveWorld Inc Patricia Harris-Braun, AARP Kaliya Hamlin, Identity Woman Sara Leslie, Cisco Systems Chris Bank, Epostmarks Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Greetings Fellow #OCU2009 Attendees, I have taken the Session Participants sign-in sheet and transcribed it (as best I could) into this spreadsheet. Please check and update your information as appropriate. http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=raY9JGwTzfwooN- nJI9SRBA&inv=ocunotes@gmail.com&t=6547871873470911566&guest It's not an attachment -- it's stored online at Google Docs. To open this document, just click the link above. The notes, nicely taken by Jaysie McLinn, are also available at: http://www.socialtext.net/ocu2009/index.cgi?how_to_manage_multiple_personalities_rel ationships_online Also see below for notes copied and pasted from the link in case you do not have access to the wiki! I encourage you to review, correct and enhance as you see fit. Finally, I am interested in continuing the discussion we started at the conference. For starters I have created a new hashtag, #smpersona, that I would encourage you to use when tweeting items of relevance to this topic. Additionally, I am open to other ideas how we can create a space for dialogue and exchange (e.g. Google Group, Wiki, Ning site, etc.) I'd love to
  15. 15. hear your thoughts. Thanks again for your participating in this session. I found it stimulating and informative. Chip Roberson, ClickMarkets chip@clickmarkets.net What are we here? Discussion topics: • How does one interact with all his/her niches without spillover from one creating noise in another? • How can one be authentic online? • Does one merge the personal with the professional or keep them separate? Comments / Questions • Moderation is key. • Balance, how much is too much to share? • Companies create "personalities" to go undercover to get momentum for the company. Is this honorable? • How does this fit with the gaming community's use of personas? • Be transparant as possible, be open, be engaged - this will strengthen your brand in the long run. • Social fatigue - people may be nervous using technology that appears to be designed by techies for techies; quantify their importance. • Business - foster community - it's important to learn how to develop your personality in social media. • Moderation - be honest, never lie, If someone is causing problems, let them know gracefully. • Sharing too much - ex, going on vacation and house gets robbed. Use common sense. If you are not comfortable, don't share. • Boundary - where is that fine line? How much is too much information? (e.g. Facebook friend said something derogatory to a fellow friend can be very challenging). • You have to stay in control of eh product - don't be naive. • Social norms are evolving on the web -- it's going to take time. • The Mine Project - you decide where the info goes and who it goes to. http://themineproject.org/ • Community - how do we bring our personality into the community while remaining professional? • Find a balance. Q: How do I monitor all the platforms where I'm present? A: http://pipes.yahoo.com might help as it allows one to connect multiple RSS feeds and perform rather complex operations on them
  16. 16. Q: How can I keep multiple platforms updated? A: http://Ping.fm provides a single interface from which a person can selectively update more than one platform (e.g. Twitter and Facebook) at a time. Key Takeaways from the session • New social norms still evolving in the online space • In order to manage your brand, it's important to understand the tools • Personal vs Prefessional, decide if they can be joined or should they remain separate? • Have a plan from the start and know how much you are willing to share and be consistent. • A Generational Shift? - May take time for people to get comfortable with sharing online. New Hashtag for this topic on Twitter: #smpersona
  17. 17. Social CRM (1D) Convener: Ajay Ramachandran Notes-taker(s): Scott Dodds Other Members: Scott Dodds Jill Finlayson Linda Sharp David Silver John Summers Natalie Lopez Scott Hogrefe Jeff Camara Silona Bonewald Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Opportunity & problem: How do we manage customer relationship and the get fragmented How do you create a unified framework across these domains - mine the conversations - find and influence the influencers - and how to do that in an authentic and respectful way. Comcast is the leading example, started in a rogue way with the twitter ComcastCares. Just one example, but he raised the bar. One issue that shows, though , is the problems of scale, as the one-to-one interactions are very resource intensive. One of the benefits of social media is the opportunity to leverage your brand advocates to influence others and gain the network effects. then the issue is how to capture the advocates attention span. How does this work in a B2B environment? Getting a snapshot out of what is bubbling up across all networks utilizing social media monitoring to measure activity and buzz and mapping it back to the profile of that user and report on it. Reframeit Monitor sentiment through comments syndicated out. Tone, sentiment and analysis tools - can't find one that works We have budget but we can't show a working model today. The minute something 'jumps the shark', then the crowd goes and finds another way Can you keep the conversation going? Keeping the information alive in one place and then starting up new conversations.
  18. 18. Mine these conversations to get insights on tone or topics Today its all manual, you need to automate it and scale. there is an underlying problem - when you are monitoring something, it is not tied to objectives or business goals. ROI is the underlying tone, but we can prove business impact. Everything funnels into a partner community now that replaces the tools are not there yet - are you trying to track individuals, or the communication about your product. And once you have those things, what can you do with it? There was a report out recently that 80% of social media traffic is unreported. - only 80% click the link, the rest is follow on traffic. One of the key values of community is Customer Relationship Management Bottom lines to two things: revenue and margin WOM and engagement & product improvement: revenue building cost savings: self-service, help desk (margin building) What are the key questions and topics we want to address? • WOM advocacy - how to measure it, how do we facilitate that? • Tools for syndicating content • Measurement is a general problem, and how we can measure the business impact and ROI • How can we do this on a one-to-one basis to see how the business is impacting the individual user. • How does market awareness brand affinity affect profit gain? Does that participation translate into improved revenues. • Social identity - people have different identities in different places: who is the consumer, and where are they? What types of technology tools and solutions we are trying to use? You can target users using the knowledge and awareness to action. NetApp: use a business to business site, you must sign up with a real name - no anonymity the quality of conversation have increased, as the audience is have had to remove one post in a year have 18000 people in the community, 120 sales engineers answering questions - 60% customers & prospects. Anyone can join, but partners can access specific places. Changed partner portal to community. All messaging has 'to discuss it more' link to the community. Content started out mostly employees, now is starting to be created by users - but he doesn't distinguish between customers and employees - they are all end-users.
  19. 19. Product ideas from the community are also being added to the product - shows business impact. Trying to define a customer lifecycle within the community. Have a separate, paid support community that are uploaded into the KB. One problem is conversations are not able to go across different platforms. Using Jive, with multiple instances Netapp seems to be ahead of the curve in terms of broad-scale engagement with their customers, most companies are not engaging at that level. many of Ajay's customers have forums, communities, twitter accounts - how do you get a 360 degree view? And how do you understand the individual contacts and mapping those contacts to your CRM records. Seem to be a the beginning of this in the industry. Social media monitoring solutions like Network Insights that are very targeted, around specific campaigns. The metrics are evolving and going back to the social behavioral modeling. Other social media monitoring platforms • Relevant noise • Radian 6 Problems we've found - a little too fuzzy, give you a general directional signal, and you can drill down into the post. But they don't do the social graphing. The tools are very poor in identifying a single person across multiple personas, and the context of the organization they are participating in. Trying to measure twitter traffic, facebook traffic, and link them back, but to measure across the different domains. Its hard to tie traffic together across external sources - you know where they are coming from, but they don't extend to facebook, etc. One way that social identity is being addressed is via reputation - the data needs to be reciprocated, and they will let you spread the data if they get some value form it (via reputation). Another way is through social equity from your relationships to others. People are willing to give a lot of their data in limited social contexts if they have group equity. What is the percentage of people who care about privacy of data vs those who don't - hard to measure since the people who care don't respond.
  20. 20. Key successes of the Netapp community is the relationships they've built - putting out more information can build respect and relationships. Netapp sets the example by being open, and they are able to leverage their exisiting reputation. Best strategy is to ask people for their data - "we'd like to converse with you on Twitter/Facebook". They then come online and share everything about themselves in exchange for an incentive - to know and hear about the products and some small amounts of free stuff. free focus groups and product feedback Identifying who the influencers are amazing word of mouth marketing through syndication Those 6000 users are Problem is they may falsify the information to get the gift - the importance is to leverage the reputation system to prevent that. Is there any interest in allowing community members to share with each other? They can if they want. The focus is on the consumer's benefit to getting hte information they want, and the brand monitors the conversation to get the insights - extracting topics from user feeds based on their conversations to forms a more complete user profile in the CRM about what tpoics they are interested in. Asking questions in a forums is a demand signal - can identify a prospect in a forum 10- 15 weeks before they trigger a demand event on your site or contact your sales team. It takes 18 times to hear the product Swarm marketing - influencing the crowd to move and act together. The intent and desire starts to turn into action. They socialize together and act to together, and you can coalesce the intent into and desired action. Seeing in movie we can see how the intent of going to see a movie can turn into box office sales, and we can start to measure that. Surround Marketing: if you know the user's identity, you can surround market them through multiple channels that is respectful - the right place, channel and time that they want to engage on.
  21. 21. Online Recommendations (1E) Convener: Garett Engle Other Members: Jim Scott Carole McManus Katherine Kornas Brenna Robertson Michael Rafko Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Recommendations strengthen community, improve everything Egret Endeavors Simple methodology Improve recommendations • Accuracy, i.e., make accurate to the individual Amazon suggestions about a group, not customized to YOU Netflix doesn't ask WHY you like a film Context for recommendations • People like you • Capture more info about YOU • You like A, you're not necessarily going to like B just because a similar group does • Don't ignore the individual Caring.com • Hundreds of thousands of caregiver listings How do you get people to rate and comment? This is a community-building problem Reputation systems and incentives can help build this type of content Pandora Model • recommendation based on artist • personalized via thumbs up/thumbs down But if someone doesn't like a song, WHY don't they like it? When are you like the group, when are you not?
  22. 22. Toolbox.com Helping people do their job better Find relevancy Intriguing content vs. actual helpfulness Knowledge share Personalized recommendation Social circles vs. professional circles Providing the NEW experience vs. established social network Attributes-- which pertain to YOU Aggregate into a profile Ratings from others strengthen attributes What is the fall-off rate for clicks? How do you get users to invest their time and give feedback What is the worth of input from people who are constantly recommending things? Who do you trust? Why do you trust them? Attributes of the reviewer
  23. 23. Metrics for Measuring Community Health (1F) Convener: Amber Authier, officialCOMMUNITY Notes-taker(s): Charlotte Ziems Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: We need to define what a healthy community means. This will depend on each individual community. The Community Manager defines the type of community (e.g. software development community would measure number of downloads, etc… where a musician’s community may measure sign in data and mailing list numbers). Unique visitors may be on the rise, but is the unique visitors a real number? Do they indicate health? Most participants felt that the answer to that question was no. All of us have an intuitive sense of health of a community because we are part of that family. Also a lot of families have rules. Does post frequency = health? What causes post frequency? How to encourage participation? It is based on qualities of community manager. Someone noted that the role of community manager and the role of a community leader are different. The Community Manager needs to identify the Community Leader. Health = loyalty and usefulness but how do you measure loyalty? Return visits and time spent was the most common. Do Community Managers create community? Measure specific content and posts to assess problems solved. Is counting the number of experts in a community a sign of health? Is expert usefulness dependant on the number of people listening to or reading that experts’ posts? No – an expert is an expert regardless of followers. Lithium has issued a free report/white paper called “Community Health Index”. In it they identify Growth, Useful Content, Popularity, interactivity, and liveliness as metrics for community health. Metric can change over time but Lithium normalized the info over time. A “Kudos” rating system was developed. More information can be found with Lithium. How to measure “useful content”? Ratings – Positive only = kudos. Users gain reputation so weight of kudos from lots of reps is larger. Why only kudos? A la Digg. It prevents the gaming of the system. Inferred stuff going wrong. Tagging also enters into it. 99% of content comes from 10% of users.
  24. 24. Lots of metrics aggregated together = health. Get Satisfaction has a Satisfactionometer, which allows users to measure kudos more gradually. Surface best answers to top. Lithium= kudos. Question: If a new user gets a bad rating, do they post again or does it limit growth? That is why Lithium does kudos only. But no rating = a bad rating. Users getting bad rating is a moderation problem. Work with users to understand why their posts don’t get kudos. Small community may be valuable to members even though it isn’t big. How to define health when not every member contributes or when community isn’t huge. Sometimes growth of community ruins health of that community. Twitter is great tool to moderate community and connect with members. How do people measure Twitter? # of followers. Twitterizer. # of retweets. Getting sentiment across tweets too. Retweets of good tweets and retweets of bad tweets. Communities – what is their value in contributing the business as a whole. Measure that with affinity. How do we explain to clients the value of the online world to the offline world? Sentiment. Through research. Through social media monitoring. A human is needed to interpret metrics. Statistics need to be considered with human judgment. Some communities are small and don’t have the resources to do sophisticated research to measure health. Social capital vs. intellectual capital. Health = success? What’s unhealthy? Norm- busting behavior. Crucial Conversation was recommended as a book worth reading. It covers how to bring up taboo subjects. Patterns of behavior indicating “unhealthy” are predictable in their path they take so their path can be shifted or influenced. Healthy communities need guidelines that need to be defined and enforced. Enforcing guidelines is key – you have to do it consistently and fairly. No cops in every corner. Pre-establishing guidelines and culture influences the health of the community. Affinity super hard to measure – requires natural lay-processing. Health is based on community purposes. If your community has no purpose, there is no concern of health.
  25. 25. Can’t you just ask the community if they think the community is healthful? It does work. NPS = Net Promoter Score = Sentiment. Some got great results from this tactic. For some communities this is helpful and for others it may not be. Is the community part of a healthy ecosystem = pro creation/growth A metaphor of “automated health care” was mentioned. You want to talk with your doctor Why don’t you just ask them – iPerceptions.com has a free tool for asking them. Tying goals of community back to the goals of the business. 3 factors to measure = 1) traffic (data) 2) behaviors (management/downloads/posts/etc…) and 3) Value Proposition (weather your stats are increasing or decreasing Value has to tie back to a tangible business goal to get executive buy-in. Attributes of healthy community = good communication, dialog, good information, respect, participation, ideas, interest, engagement, diversity, inclusive (these were the attributes of what the discussion attendees indicated was the measure of the success of our session). What tools are people using? Google Analytics (you are on your own to interpret and set up), Omniture (pre-established relationship, assistance with set up) Vendor platforms are fine, but reporting sucks. Jive, Teligent, etc... It is still a manual process.
  26. 26. How to Nurture a Thriving Open Source Community in a Commercial Open Source Context (1G) Convener: Peter Theony Other Members: Nick Pollitt Karen McAdams Jack Herrick Stefano Maffulli Frankie Callahan Terri Peluso Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps:
  27. 27. Metrics for Measuring Community Health (1H) Convener: Amber Authier Note Taker: Charlotte Ziems Other Members: Arielle Hoffman Myrna Rivera Dana Nourie Daniel Ciomek Debbie Austin Robin Bertelsen Amber Authier Guy Martin Ron Liechty Jay MacIntosh John Todor Chas Warner Keith Savageau Shana Brennan Becky Herndon Jennifer Graziami Navneet Grewal Krs Freeman Kirby Freeman Jeff Patrick Hiren Patel Amy Muller Jordan Williams Mike Rowland Kevin Burns Jorge Dorantes Raul Wescott Melyssa Nelson Estee Solomon Gray Thomas Knoll Jessica Margolin Michael Sharma Carole Lin Marcos Polanco Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Defining health of community depends on type of community. • Community manager defines type of community (eg software dev measures = # of downloads) • Musician community- sign in data and list members • Unique visitors are on the rise • Are unique visitors a real number? • Do they indicate health? NO All of us have an intuitive sense of “health” of community because we’re all part of a family. • In families there are rules Post frequency = health. • What causes post frequency? • How to encourage participation? • Qualities of community leader? • Role of community manager is not same as role of community leader o Manager has to identify leader Health= loyalty and usefulness • How to measure loyalty?
  28. 28. o Return visits o Time spent Do communities create community? • Measure specific content and posts to assess problems solved. Community’s number of experts is a sign of health • Is expert usefulness dependent on the number of people listening to or reading that experts’ posts? o NO- an expert is an expert regardless of followers? Lithium- report on “Community Health Index” • Growth, useful content, popularity, interactivity, and liveliness • Free report – metrics can change over time but Lithium normalized the information over time. • “Kudos” rating system • Lithium community has more info • Q: New user gets a bad rating- do they post again and does it limit growth? o A: that’s why only kudos are used • Q: But no rating = bad rating o Users getting bad rating is a moderation problem. Work with users to understand why their posts don’t get kudos How to measure “useful content”? • Ratings: positive only= kudos • Users gain reputation so weight of kudos from lots of reps is larger • Why only kudos? o Prevents gaining of system o Inferred stuff going wrong o Tagging also enters into it o 99% of content comes from 10% of users • Lots of metrics aggregated together = health • GetSatisfaction has “Satisfactionmeter” • Allows users to measure kudos more granularly, surfaces best answers to the top Small communities are valuable to their members. Even though its not big. How to define health when not every member contributes or when community is not huge. Sometimes growth of community ruins health of the community. Twitter is a great tool to moderate community and content with members. How to measure Twitter?: # of followers; Twitteralizer; # of return tweets- on both good and bad tweets; Getting sentiment across
  29. 29. Communities their value contributing to business? Measure that with affinity. How to explain to clients the value of the online world to the offline world. Sentiment. Brand. Research social media monitoring. Need a human to interpret metrics. Statistics need to be combined with human judgment. Some communities are small and don’t have the resources to measure. Social capital vs. intellectual capital. Health success? Whats unhealthy? Norm-busting behavior, Crucial Conversations if you’re never heard about. How to bring up taboo subjects? Patterns of behavior indicating “unhealthy”. Predictable in the path they take so their path can be shifted. Community guidelines need to be defined and enforced. Enforcing guidelines is key- have to do it consistently and fairly and make it distributed. No cops in every corner. Pre-establishing culture influences health of community. Affinity super hard to measure- requires natural processing. Health is based on community’s purpose. No purpose = no concern about health. Cant you just ask the community if they think the community is healthful? IT DOES WORK. NPS = net promotor score. Sentiment. Person @ Sun asked community and got great results. For some that’s helpful, for other’s its not. Part of healthy ecosystem = procreation/growth. Metaphor of “automated health care”. You want to talk to your doctor. Why don’t you just ask them- iPerceptions.com has a free tool for asking them. Tying goals of community back to goals of business- 3 factors 1. traffic (data) 2. behaviors (downloads, posts, etc.) 3. value proposition
  30. 30. Value has to be back to a tangible business goal Attributes of a healthy community: good info, respect, participant ideas, interest, engagement, diversity, inclusiveness What tool or SW are people using? • Google analytics- you’re on your own • Omniture – pre-established relationship • Vendor platform data is fine but reporting sucks!
  31. 31. Using Other Social Media Networks to Build Your Community (1I) Convener: Janet Fouts Notes-taker(s): Megan Keane Other Members: Robb Miller Gail Ann Williams Heather Rodde Megan Keane Susan Tenby Heather Wong Jenee Cline Chris Wolz Zoya Fallah Hal Bryan Terry Nagel Luchen Foster Ray Eisenberg Denise Kalos Heather Forsythe Bill Jacobson Nathan Gwilliam Thomas Miner Buddy Teaster Will Bunker Rachel Weidinger J.J. Toothman Mike Rosenthal Lauren Klein Cindy Starks Christine Sarkis Tim Knight Jun Shim Debbi Dembecki Mary Song Andrew Bishop Randy Paynter Lynne Steffins Tom Nickel Brian Sullican Shara Karasic Molly Robinson Cynthia Schroeder Rachel Makool Jennifer Keever Janice Linden- Reed Angie Ryan Tom Humbarger Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: • GroupLeaf place to aggregate social media identities of your users together • SocialMention (free), Trackr (free), many paid tracking tools (Radiant6 is one) • A lot of tracking is scrappy • Can use analytics to track where traffic coming from on your social network. Then can do campaign targetting specific social media network & look at results • Get community involved where they live already • Content created on site automatically can update Twitter, Facebook, etc.--bring traffic back in, incentive is one place to go to write that goes out to many channels • Strategy of having tools in one place to push info. out • Every single social network and community has own culture: each have own language & way of speaking, have to tailor message to culture • Don't choose the network first: Understand your audience: segment your audience to figure out who your market is, who you want to connect o, what their behavior on other sites is to get most bang from your effort • Key of Twitter/spread/viral marketing is getting connected to a few key people with large networks, target folks who are interested in what you're interested in, reach out to them
  32. 32. • When you go to funder, your Twitter influence score matters; something to think about for nonprofits looking for funding. • Many Twitter ranking tools available to find influential users • Support team at Comcast an example of customer service on Twitter. One individual face w/ team behind it • Southwest another good example of corporation effectively using Twitter, as our JetBlue, Zappos • Some pizza places used by abolishing phone orders in favor of tweeting orders in, give out free coupons • charitywater.org fantastic example of nonprofit using social media in smart ways • Big brands traditionally more support in community • How are you managing all these channels with not a lot of people? Find tools that do double-duty: Ping.fm (selective updating any/all of different social networks), Seesmic, Twirhl good for managing mutliple accounts. Mobile tools: Tweetie,Twitterfon, TweetStack mobile tools • How do you get conversations on social networks aggregated back to your site? • If your conversation is interesting enough, they will go to where it is. You may catch them one site and lead them to your site • Incentivize users can be low-level, give 'em a t-shirt • Transactional questions in a forum • Easy to forget that some people are allergic to certain kinds of communication: have options for them to participate in the medium they like, be it forums, paper mail, Facebook, etc. • Strategy matters--where do you want your community to live? What do you want to accomplish? and drive the users to where you can achieve your objectives • Ideally you would use both own communtiy & other social platforms • Huge difference between collecting user info. & putting in a database vs having them opt-in • Hopefully reason behind the group isn't to get lead, but instead about the subject matter & community • Any stats on likelihood of joining community of having FB connect vs not? Nice to have convenience of easily clicking into FB. BUT don't necessarily want to share all your community interactions w/ Facebook, most people have many facets of their lives don't necessarily want to share everything cross-platform • Methods for finding discussions? Keyword searches on Google, SocialMention, etc. and get alerts • YouTube success also with tutorials, training videos, etc. • Many marketing YouTube contests w/ mixed success • Small prizes (<$1000) work well • Key is videos don't go away, they are still there builiding traffic • Finding the people who are passionate & give them tools to evangelize behind your cause/campaign/brand • Choose your topic carefully b/c you can't control what they are going to say • Social media great way to re-purpose content for free • Reaching out to content creators to feature their content
  33. 33. • Importance of aggregation to be able to put it all in one place; users will want to go to one place for all the best stuff • When you support thought leaders on other networks, they will return the favor in ways you can't imagine
  34. 34. Recovery.Gov – Myth or reality (1J) Convener: Claude Whitmyer Notes-taker(s): Claude Whitmyer Other Members: Angela Hey Francine Hardaway Rajesh Pandey Claude Whitmyer Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Recover.Gov - Reality or Myth? Conclusion: No real community on Recovery.Gov. No dialog. Needs a community manager and community software. Reference: This book is a good place to look for a detailed break down of what’s actually going on: Guide To The Stimulus Packages The Definitive Defense Reference. (available on Amazon). The recovery act mandates infrastructure for telecommunications (to finish providing access to the Internet for those segments of society that don't currently have it and to help schools get wired or upgrade their existing telecommuniations infrastructure/Internet access). Convener: Claude Whitmyer, Attendees: Angela Hey, Francine Hardaway, Rajesh Pandey 1. Small businesses interested in getting funding to create a for-profit company working in the online community sector. The Recovery Act is more setup toward vertical segments than small businesses in general. For small business the most important thing is the changes in SBA Loans. *Waivering of fees *Lowering of interest rate *Increasing the guarantee/lowering the collateral *Software = qualifies as a manufactured product Reality, it's now easier to qualify for an SBA loan, but there are very few "premier SBA lenders," those banks officially allowed to submit the loans. So it is NOT easy to get the loan, though it is possible.
  35. 35. Patriot's express loans for Vets is the easiest small business loans to get. You can apply directly on SBA.Gov for up to $35,000. The nature of the funding makes it possible to get the software, website development, and training included in the project. 2. Telecommunications infrastructure: USDA RUS grants to wire economically depressed rural areas and tie indian reservation sites together. "Wiring" is mandated. Video and web conferencing, software/hardware, training to use. Proposal to include creation of and training for learning communities using all this infrastructure, make sense. Partnering with local business, local government, indian agencies, ad local colleges seems like a good strategy. 3. Telemedicine/Health Records Infrastructure: Again, large amount mandated. *Money for health IT for small providers to move to electronic health records. *Money to get certified by CCIT which is the board to certify what can be used for health records. 4. There is green weatherization money. But this probably only releated to green businesses or non=profits who happen to also want to build online community. The nature of the funding makes it possible to get the software, website development, and training included in the project. Most money goes to various agencies. From federal governement to state agencies to local agencies. Most of the money is goiong to large corporations with established relationships with government agencies. right now recovery.gove is only reporting what has been awarded. Very little is announced with enough of alead time to submit an application by the deadline 5. Higher Ed Capital improvements is the easiest way to get a share. One advantage of universities is that they can come up with large, "shovel-ready" Conclusion: No real community on Recovery.Gov. No dialog. Needs a community manager and community software. Next Steps: Write/blog about the inequities of this system and the neglect of the small (less than 100 employees) business which actually creates more than half of all jobs and numbers as many as 21 million companies. There should be more support for this
  36. 36. size business since it has an even greater actual impact on the economy than the Fortune blah blah. AND…these businesses are both cheaper to bail out and easier to make successful.
  37. 37. Social Media Virgins (1J) Convener: Claude Whitmyer Notes-taker(s): Claude Whitmyer Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Who do I need a community? Customers are 3X more likely to buy when engaged in community How do I engage people without them feeling marketed to? Next step tie on line communities back to traditional social interaction
  38. 38. Open Space Second Session Topics
  39. 39. The Trainwreck that is the Distributed Conversation (2A) Convener: J.J. Toothman Notes-taker(s): Delia Santiago Other Members: JJ Toothman (host, @jjtoothman) Dave Peck Delia Santiago Tom Humbarger Karoli Kuns Marc Dangeard Scott Hogrefe Francine Hardaway Maryam Webster Eric Suesz Amy Muller Jill Finlayson Scott Dodds Debbie Dembecki Janice Linden-Reed Chas Warner Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: • Conversation is happening all around the place about. • Someone might blog, tweet about it, feeds to Facebook. People might reply in all of those places. o What techniques/ practices do people have to deal with that to have singular healthy conversation? o Is that necessary? o Does this distributed conversation make community weaker or stronger? • Prob: Someone might only go to one place and think there isn’t a conversation. Also, it makes things hard to track. A good discussion might take place but only fraction of folks are contributing to. • Can be okay having them distinct, but want way to aggregate for archival purposes. So for example, so you know where the conversations were. 1) discovering it 2) archiving it. • Is this solved by a missing widget for Wordpress. Tumblr. All Top dashboard. • Desire to have it feed into somewhere so you can see who’s seeing what instead of checking everything. • Cross posting link vs. cross posting the content…. • Also issue of OTHERS reposting your content. “Cut and Paste” • So various paradigms include: o Posting same content multiple places o Quoting and reposting (cut and paste) o Post one place and push out links to multiple places. • Upside to distributed conversation: A positive, particularly if there are links back to each other.
  40. 40. • Do you want to close the loop at some point? Don’t HAVE to, but there can be a benefit to it. • Is this a missing visualization tool… or more? • Conversation prism. Trackback. Track on Twitter. Bit.ly. • What do folks do to track their content: o Track o Bit.ly o Technorati o Many others… • Connect connect in first place via Yahoo Pipes, Tarpipe. • So: Tools for monitoring, aggregating this is not necessarily there (yet). • Could have conversation all stream/ feed back to the original posting. • Reframe It as another tool—offers more control. But also adds another layer of content, too. • Temporal component, too. 1) how real time show, distributed across networks 2) how tally the impact. Twitter isn’t as easy to search as far back as a blog post. • Folks want this information come/ sent TO them. • “Our messages are traveling faster than we can follow them; that’s necessarily a horrible thing”. • Silo’d communities vs. one unified community. • How do you know if people “care”? • Do the members want to engage with other groups? • Layer of abstraction: persistent identifiers. • Twitter and FB has democratized the conversation. Can follow lots of people at once on Twitter. One to many component of the conversation. • Discussion of Google Wave; have integrated conversations from it, among many other useful features. What standards apps are being written on. • Does distributed conversation strengthen or weaken to community? o Strengthen, but want to monitor it all. o Who is talking about our stuff (as a brand)? o Where can I go to participate? • Complete Web Monitoring by Sean Power • LeedLander Key question: o How do we facilitate it (the conversation)? Takeaways • We needs better tools to track conversation, linkback. Visualization tool. • You can’t control it. • How can you get users to link content/ conversation back to you? If it’s so easy to distribute content, make it as easy to aggregate the conversation. • Be aware if you’re using the correct network. • Distributed conversation—Do Not Ruin It! This is okay!!
  41. 41. Strategy and Communities (2B) Convener: Nolifer Merchant Notes-taker(s): Valerie Kameya Other Members: John Todor Mike Sitrin Krys Franklin Denise Kalos Navneet Grewal Ray Eisenberg Mary Walker Jordan Williams Nikki Pava Alexa Bruce Valerie Kameya Perrine Crampton Denise Kalos-Brevida Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: AOL- Online corporate learning. Taught Web 2.0 tech. Recognized contributers. V. successful. Wrap learning into process so ppl don't go back to habits. Citibank- learning lab. Net app- using external network internally. Move away from distrib lists. No central resources. Participants can search for info. Emails sent- lost info, can't search other's email historically like a forum can. Intranet vs. online community. Intranet- login annoyance. Autodesk- 90% intranet info into sharepoint site. Lessons learned- moved intranet over with same structure. Success factors workshop- Ppl moving to community from intranet (static). How to apply community activities in process. Encourage conversation- brings health to org. REI- Sharepoint- a repository, not a community. Self-selecting- online community fans participate. REI for good. Great place to work -Forbes. Yammer- connect around a tradeshow. Long tenure workers- reluctance to change. How do you merge old email/meeting ppl w/ newer workers more comfortable with it? Sugg: Model the new behavior 1-9-90 1 drive , 9 helping, 90 coming along for ride Something has no value to you because it's not you. What can we achieve using social media vs. non sm?
  42. 42. -Meetings- tough questions in social media enables employees to ask qs not comfortable asking in public. everyone cloaked in meeting- safe. collaboration safer. can tell someone five levels up that they don't think their idea is good. AOL- differential levels of buy-in. Denise- Prob w/anonymity. Can communicate w/comm manager about problems and would be answered. Answered in forum so no one singled out. New form of submitting qs on index cards (ppl put qs and names on cards). Prob w/anonymity- 360 review- ppl attack anonymously because they feel protected. Denise feels we need to own our voices- be responsible, considerate. Pros- temporary anonymity- personas. Ongoing identity. Studies- we can't stop ourselves from judging ideas based on who we think it's coming from. Not listening to 12 year old kid, not your demo, not listening. Bob always says that, you stop listening to Bob. The strategy/decision making process is a social decision. REI- headquartered in 1 place, locations in many places (85% of customer interactions occur here). Good to know if input coming from hourly employee vs manager. Yammer- great way to get ppl engaged in community around a tradeshow. Could be fun, a contest. Embed a behavior. Yammer feels friendly, has pic next to it vs. email- very formal- form, white space. Creating open environment. Sustainable Design conference. Frog Design. Write down what your brand is on a piece of paper. How you want your brand to be seen. Facilitates collab learning in old school method. Fan of social media but very suspect of it. tweet- social media more about them than you. how much of it are problems that wouldn't exist if you sat down and talked to them? Or social media gives us tools to do what we want to do- collaborate. Interact more as equals. Way to build cool things. Community has to happen in person. We are all ppl. Tapping into what we want as ppl-shake hands, put face with name, feel the person's warmth. Stay connected as ppl. One POV- we don't want to collaborate b/c we don't want things to move slower. Understand theoretically that collab gives buy-in. Strategy- comm decision making body? Prob bad strategy. Or to connect w/what's going on in org?
  43. 43. Set clear expectation. Authority, delegation, etc. Don't want to set expectation of listening to ppl and acting on it. Arg made in Wisdom of the Crowds book- comm made of diverse indiv w/diff level of knowledge- aggregated decision could be better than small group of experts. More buy-in. Comm decision making diff process than exec decision making. Don't combine both- makes it slower. Culture- ppl feel safer when anonymous- is the prob collab decision making or the problem of an unsafe corp culture? Maybe not either/or -spectrum. 100% hierarchical today...decide move to 70%. 10 yrs. ago product innovation 3 yrs. apart- now 6 months apart for cell phones. 50% collab/50% hierarchical? Need for speed. HP- 50% more ideas from other areas of company than from trad R&D dept. We is Me book example- how do you ascribe acctability to anyone? profits eventually donated to charity. Someone needs to be responsible in the end. Idea generation. Leader of division- explore it. Then give smaller decision to community- do you like blue or red? Netapps- contest- ideas for apps. 19 workable ideas; 1 in dev. Beta tester group from comm. How do you have people shape what the problem is? Comm platforms forcing honesty. Stating the problem- no way to deny if a bunch of people are saying that's the problem. Do you have to ask what the problem is vs. scanning through vibrant community's posts to derive problem? Q: how many resources do you have to put against it? NLP -Programming to pull tone, comments, buzz in community. Creating dashboards. System in large company- rollout. Upper people bought in, lower level people didn't use it, said they weren't talking the same language. Linda- you need to talk to customer and read the comments. It's fine for computer to segment, but person needs to ask the right questions and listen to answers. Voice of the employee project- company changed strategy from lean and mean. gave employees open ended questions. promised confidentiality. Asking questions is traditional. Create conversations around it.
  44. 44. Bottoms up approach conversations. Let exec get into the club. Get participants into the club- use multidimensional tagging system. Flippers of interest to some REI stores, not others. Ratings. How to frame and package info so execs can hear. Overwhelmed w/data. Challenge of comm- high volume. Mgrs used to it- execs overwhelmed. Pics? Graphs? How can communities play a part in strategy? not strategy in community. How can community help you achieve your strategy? Execs not distributing info they have; which creates less buy-in for lower ppl. Hierarchical doesn't lend itself to uncontrived conversations. Execs have to speak their language. Lower level ppl -no workforce training, just bots, cog in and cog out. Is online and social media a tool or a paradigm shift? This is a new way to market. This is a collab tool. How do ppl do online community along with their reg job? Wrong question- this is their reg job. How do we monetize this? Don't think it's about monetization. Employee engagement- participating in diff way. Talent segmentation. Who's engaged? Who's not? Are they pivotal and critical? Everyone participates in diff ways. Understand where they sit and how they play. Und how they participate in their diff roles. Social media- vehicle for change- new org. Push-back- give it to me the way I want it. Citibank- put into situation- have to figure out strategy in a few hours. How are you going to survive in new environment? John Chambers- Cisco video. Top- bottom- nothing in the middle Focus on strategy and process, not the vehicle or tools. Can you drive comm through a tool? sharepoint, twitter.
  45. 45. Using Strategy and Communities (2C) Convener: Nilofer Merchant Notes-taker(s): Valerie Kameya Other Members: John Todor Mike Sitrin Krys Franklin Denise Kalos Navneet Grewal Ray Eisenberg Mary Walker Jordan Williams Nikki Pava Alexa Bruce Valerie Kameya Perrine Crampton Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Denise Kalos-Brevida AOL- Online corporate learning. Taught Web 2.0 tech. Recognized contributers. V. successful. Wrap learning into process so ppl don't go back to habits. Citibank- learning lab. Net app- using external network internally. Move away from distrib lists. No central resources. Participants can search for info. Emails sent- lost info, can't search other's email historically like a forum can. Intranet vs. online community. Intranet- login annoyance. Autodesk- 90% intranet info into sharepoint site. Lessons learned- moved intranet over with same structure. Success factors workshop- Ppl moving to community from intranet (static). How to apply community activities in process. Encourage conversation- brings health to org. REI- Sharepoint- a repository, not a community. Self-selecting- online community fans participate. REI for good. Great place to work -Forbes. Yammer- connect around a tradeshow. Long tenure workers- reluctance to change. How do you merge old email/meeting ppl w/ newer workers more comfortable with it? Sugg: Model the new behavior 1-9-90 1 drive , 9 helping, 90 coming along for ride Something has no value to you because it's not you.
  46. 46. What can we achieve using social media vs. non sm? -Meetings- tough questions in social media enables employees to ask qs not comfortable asking in public. everyone cloaked in meeting- safe. collaboration safer. can tell someone five levels up that they don't think their idea is good. AOL- differential levels of buy-in. Denise- Prob w/anonymity. Can communicate w/comm manager about problems and would be answered. Answered in forum so no one singled out. New form of submitting qs on index cards (ppl put qs and names on cards). Prob w/anonymity- 360 review- ppl attack anonymously because they feel protected. Denise feels we need to own our voices- be responsible, considerate. Pros- temporary anonymity- personas. Ongoing identity. Studies- we can't stop ourselves from judging ideas based on who we think it's coming from. Not listening to 12 year old kid, not your demo, not listening. Bob always says that, you stop listening to Bob. The strategy/decision making process is a social decision. REI- headquartered in 1 place, locations in many places (85% of customer interactions occur here). Good to know if input coming from hourly employee vs manager. Yammer- great way to get ppl engaged in community around a tradeshow. Could be fun, a contest. Embed a behavior. Yammer feels friendly, has pic next to it vs. email- very formal- form, white space. Creating open environment. Sustainable Design conference. Frog Design. Write down what your brand is on a piece of paper. How you want your brand to be seen. Facilitates collab learning in old school method. Fan of social media but very suspect of it. tweet- social media more about them than you. how much of it are problems that wouldn't exist if you sat down and talked to them? Or social media gives us tools to do what we want to do- collaborate. Interact more as equals. Way to build cool things. Community has to happen in person. We are all ppl. Tapping into what we want as ppl-shake hands, put face with name, feel the person's warmth. Stay connected as ppl. One POV- we don't want to collaborate b/c we don't want things to move slower. Understand theoretically that collab gives buy-in. Strategy- comm decision making body? Prob bad strategy. Or to connect w/what's going on in org?
  47. 47. Set clear expectation. Authority, delegation, etc. Don't want to set expectation of listening to ppl and acting on it. Arg made in Wisdom of the Crowds book- comm made of diverse indiv w/diff level of knowledge- aggregated decision could be better than small group of experts. More buy-in. Comm decision making diff process than exec decision making. Don't combine both- makes it slower. Culture- ppl feel safer when anonymous- is the prob collab decision making or the problem of an unsafe corp culture? Maybe not either/or -spectrum. 100% hierarchical today...decide move to 70%. 10 yrs. ago product innovation 3 yrs. apart- now 6 months apart for cell phones. 50% collab/50% hierarchical? Need for speed. HP- 50% more ideas from other areas of company than from trad R&D dept. We is Me book example- how do you ascribe acctability to anyone? profits eventually donated to charity. Someone needs to be responsible in the end. Idea generation. Leader of division- explore it. Then give smaller decision to community- do you like blue or red? Netapps- contest- ideas for apps. 19 workable ideas; 1 in dev. Beta tester group from comm. How do you have people shape what the problem is? Comm platforms forcing honesty. Stating the problem- no way to deny if a bunch of people are saying that's the problem. Do you have to ask what the problem is vs. scanning through vibrant community's posts to derive problem? Q: how many resources do you have to put against it? NLP -Programming to pull tone, comments, buzz in community. Creating dashboards. System in large company- rollout. Upper people bought in, lower level people didn't use it, said they weren't talking the same language. Linda- you need to talk to customer and read the comments. It's fine for computer to segment, but person needs to ask the right questions and listen to answers. Voice of the employee project- company changed strategy from lean and mean. gave employees open ended questions. promised confidentiality. Asking questions is traditional. Create conversations around it.
  48. 48. Bottoms up approach conversations. Let exec get into the club. Get participants into the club- use multidimensional tagging system. Flippers of interest to some REI stores, not others. Ratings. How to frame and package info so execs can hear. Overwhelmed w/data. Challenge of comm- high volume. Mgrs used to it- execs overwhelmed. Pics? Graphs? How can communities play a part in strategy? not strategy in community. How can community help you achieve your strategy? Execs not distributing info they have; which creates less buy-in for lower ppl. Hierarchical doesn't lend itself to uncontrived conversations. Execs have to speak their language. Lower level ppl -no workforce training, just bots, cog in and cog out. Is online and social media a tool or a paradigm shift? This is a new way to market. This is a collab tool. How do ppl do online community along with their reg job? Wrong question- this is their reg job. How do we monetize this? Don't think it's about monetization. Employee engagement- participating in diff way. Talent segmentation. Who's engaged? Who's not? Are they pivotal and critical? Everyone participates in diff ways. Understand where they sit and how they play. Und how they participate in their diff roles. Social media- vehicle for change- new org. Push-back- give it to me the way I want it. Citibank- put into situation- have to figure out strategy in a few hours. How are you going to survive in new environment? John Chambers- Cisco video. Top- bottom- nothing in the middle Focus on strategy and process, not the vehicle or tools. Can you drive comm through a tool? sharepoint, twitter.
  49. 49. Online Publications Community Efforst: What’s Wrong, What’s Not, What’s Next- Online Publications and Sites of Print Publication (2D) Convener: Christine Sarkis Notes-taker(s): Robin Bertelsen Other Members: Jennifer Keever Jeff Eddings Alex Parlini Angela Hey Ray Eisenberg Betsy Burroughs Mina Eng Adena DeMonte Jen Nestel Rachel Romero Nicole Poindexter Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Questions we all have: Moving beyond PDFs Making content more interactive How do you engage the email list and get them into the forums How do you build a community around local news? Repurpose comment Syndicating content/broaden visibility • Fold participation into the email w/ social sharing. Social Media Insider and Budget Travel newsletters are good examples. • try polls and other hooks to get people to jump in. Ask very specific questions to get the conversation going. • Compelling content is required! • Empower your users to do the sharing for you: ShareMe tool bar Atomize and distribute - what's the value of your own website? But people need an anchoring point and that's the value of the primary website. Develop relationships to other bloggers. Have then write for you and offer to write something for them and reciprocal links. Upper management by off on community and fear of comments Set clear community guidelines, the brands should listen to the feedback, let people give their own ranks and share, Time magazine lists as an example. They used the google friend connect api. And then they made a re-ranking list app.
  50. 50. Side issue: there are too many communities to join! Google friend connect agrees with you! This can help publications fold in people quickly. What features do people have and want? Better social sharing tools so you don't overwhelm some of the people you interact with. Multiple identities to help manage the streams. People are not using the share tools enough. Static.com which allows user to broadcast content to multiple sites: FB, Twitter and MS. This is for both the editor in the CMS and readers. Where is email useful? When you know a specific person to have the info, rather than share w/ your circle of friends. Have the emails include links to comments. Newspapers The NYT is not interested in ending their pieces with calls to action to the community to get engagement. But local papers need to do this. Underlying motivations Why are you doing what you're doing? You broadcast because you want to be associated with the content. Polls Give a very low barrier to entry and help bring people into engagement. User Generated Content Uses User generated comments can be used to target the editorial and the advertising. Better targeted ads deliver a better user experience. Do 5-part articles to bring people back on a daily basis. Check lists are popular - and ask users what else should be on the list. Marketing engines run on contribution and recognition - make a hall of fame wall Repurpose content Use member comments into "new" articles or as a weekly roundup. Use reader-generated content to start a whole new piece. Distinguishing user generated content Use design, WWE handles this well. PDFs Anyone have any suggestions on how to deal with security, design and other issues - to improve the experience w/ the same features? Try talking to Adobe.
  51. 51. How Does Online Community Help Local Businesses Generate Traffic (2E) Convener: Buddy Teaster Notes-taker(s): Carole McManus Other Members: Michael Rowland, Impact Interactions Michael Mitchell, User Experience Consultant Lynne Steffens, The Groupery Claude Whitmeyer, FutureU Shara Karasic, Business.com Jim Weldon, SourceN Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Key Understandings/Observations • Many biz owners say "I don't use (social media) tools, so I'm not interested" but their customers DO, so they MUST • We're seeing more and more anecdotal evidence of how Twitter is creating successful word-of-mouth marketing campaigns • Twitter hashtags and tagging helping to build brands • Small business owners need constant contact with their customers. Email marketing doesn't cut it. Twitter and Facebook are cost-effective. • ReachLocal.com is using their platform to convert former Yellow Pages customers • Publicity around social media tools can create publicity around the business (e.g., a story about L.A.'s Korean Taco truck is about Twitter, but it benefits the business, too) • Local businesses are in an excellent position to take advantage of local events, school projects, sporting events to market their biz • Hiring college interns and retirees is cost-effective way to run social media marketing campaigns Session Notes Impactsocialmedia.com Small business consulting for local businesses looking to use Twitter, Facebook, etc. and build their online reputation. Also performs competitive analysis of local competitors and will execute strategy (tweets, updates, work with critics on third party sites, etc.) Work with local search/partner/co-branded marketing Tagging, hashtags on Twitter to help people find them SEO- keywords?
  52. 52. Build presence on social networks, AdSense, etc. Help biz build a following-- 6 month contract ensures the biz is getting the hange of it They monitor social network sites Small local biz: help them build online reputation What do small businesses do online Hyper-local communities in the best position to reach out to enthusiastic customers. Biz owner knows their habits (Hot Dog vendor knows what time/day his customers eat lunch there), local biz can cater to school projects, local sports teams, etc. Twitter success stories How do you sell to small businesses? Reach out to local businesses Get them to invest in branding, reputation, coupons Groupery.com using volunteer workforce of parent fundraisers • parents know local merchants • many merchants say coupons not working for them • Repeat exposure thru social media is valuable Groupery outreach • Biz creates profile/billboard -- ads featured on targeted emails • Built into platform • Customizable Small businesses need to build awareness • need constant contact with their customers without email ReachLocal are converting Yellow Pages customers create pg with phone/email of biz Drive SEM internally Scaling Social Media presence • use interns/college journalism students • use retirees- AARP programs • Recruit volunteer experts in exchange or free products/svs or small stipend Many biz owners say "I don't use these tools, so I'm not interested" but their customers DO, so they MUST
  53. 53. Publicity around the tools creates publicity for the biz • Twitter in the media • Facebook trickling up from their kids Chamber of Commerce still the rallying point for community businesses
  54. 54. Generals, Colonels and Community (2F) Convener: Guy Martin Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Community building is a “contact sport” How do you balance the “carrot” and the “stick” Get community to meet spirit of the law, not just letter FAQ’s are critical Need human take on metrics
  55. 55. Social Media Monitoring (2G) Convener: Jim Cashel Notes-taker(s): Tezza Yuijuico Other Members: Heather Forsythe Stephano Raffulli David Kim Matt Sharp Brieanne Bogart Tezza Yujuico Gloria Young Tim Knight Michael Sharma Charlotte Ziems Patricia Harris- Brown Jeff Patrick Chris Kenton Chip Roberson John Yamasaki John Summers Natalie Lopez Thomas Knoll Sarah Hobbs John Moore Discussion notes, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: What are the questions around Social Media Monitoring? What toools are available? What’s are the different solutions out there? Light/Med// Heavy *5-8% of high colume tweets are high reach/high-influence/high-priority that should be addressed directly. How important is it to be everywhere at the same time? Depends on the objectives of the campaign. Who matters? Who in large organizations owns the social media? - tension between marketing and customer service? - Zappo’s – it’s an organizational culture - How does social media avoid being the next CRM fiasco? o It’s not technology, it’s about customer connection and engagement - Who’s doing SM well? Zappo’s, Comcast, Embark. Monitoring to Engagement: What do you do with the data? What are the real costs? Tool is the hammer, cost of supporting what you actually do with the data (customer service? Respond to customer issues) is the house. Integrating SM into the fabric of the company:
  56. 56. Best Buy Case Study: BestBuys conversations are broadcasted on monitors in the Exec’s offices, all of a sudden people HAD to care about Social Media Who owns SM within an organization? What do small and medium-sized businesses do to handle SM outreach? Monitoring the conversation: How does the content you broadcast reflect what the audience cares about? What are they saying/not saying? SEO-like approach- what are subject interests? Tools Round up: FREE TOOLS: Google Apps Search.Twitter.com RSS Queries Yahoo Pipes Google reader Technorati Blogpulse Connectweet Tweetdeck Seesmic desktop Retweet radar Twitalyzer PAID: Radian6 ScoutLabs General Price Points: A) Couple hundred $/month: ScoutLabs B) Couple Thousand $/month: Radian6 C) $50K++: Visible Technologies Sentiment: Don’t underestimate the value of sentimment. The key is what you do with the analysis, how you integrate into the workflow. Companies: Andiamo: uses human analysis to measure sentiment Athena East: human analysis to measure sentiment, also deploy response teams to engage on SM on behalf of clients Random Notes From: Robert Dell'Immagine [rdellimmagine@vmware.com] ------------------------------- ForumOne uses these social media sites: blogs, twitter, slideshare, scrubscript (documents), youtube, facebook, linkedin How do you monitor? Lightweight tools: radiant 6 -- captures metrics on conversations on the broadest range of channels
  57. 57. Others: andiamo, visible technologies, truecast Problem with heavy volume Measure of sentiment -- what do you do with the data is the problem. Approach: generate categories, e.g spam, computer-generated content, classified ads, splogs One company is developing a product that identifies high-influence, high-volume places where there's feedback, and highlights that. Then look at content -- is it relevant to your company space and does it include words like "sucks". Then manually review the ones that score highest. Measure change over time and see if it changes as you do marketing campaigns. - Engage customer support reps to monitor and respond to social media - In a similar fashion, CRM at first failed until organizations integrated with customer service and marketing processes. - What do you do when you don't have a department to monitor social media? - B2B: fewer people talk about your brand than in B2C communities - Companies should monitor conversations related to their markets, not just those related to our products. - Do we monitor competitors via social media? Tools for monitoring social media: Free tools: Google Alerts, technorati, search.twitter.com, Google Reader + Yahoo Pipes (for RSS), Blog Pulse Cheap Tools: Radian6 (many people recommend this) Expensive: Visible Path Mike Rowland session -------------------- - Users own B2C communities; companies must participate in B2B - Push twitter & facebook people to a landing page where you can measure how many you attracted, then have them log in, and engage. - Highest correlation with purchase for decision-makers was when they visited executive blogs describing company strategy. Lesson: do exec blogs right. - Impact Interactions: white paper titled "Growing the plateau" -- how to revitalize a community that has stalled out. - Intuit moved community from customer support to marketing (2 wks ago) Community-Driven Product Design ------------------------------- Google Blogger product manager got all of his engineers on twitter. Goal is to shorten the feedback loop between engineers and customers. Since it was the product manager who pushed the idea, the engineers felt like it was their idea; rather than when the community manager proposes it, they feel it's another task pushed on them. Accept360 for requirements collection and management.
  58. 58. Identifying and Engaging Online Influencers (2H) Convener: Gam Dias Notes-taker(s): Paul Ardoin Other Members: Dana Nourie Heather Rodde Cynthia Schroeder Matt Warburton Kevin Burns Luchen Foster LaSandra Brill Josh Stivers Molly Robinson Thomas Miner Will Bunker Paul Ardoin Heather Sarkissian Chris Bank Myrna Rivera Marcos Polanco Andrew Bishop Tom Nickel Mary Song Melissa Hasan Ron Liechty Jenee Cline Discussion Notes: Good Practices identified with context, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Questions from the group: How do you find influencers? 1. Identify the top 1% of your user population (AKA "superusers"). Superusers don't always equal influencers; they must have good reputations, provide positive, valuable input to community. 2. Attempt to convert reviewers to bloggers. 3. Look at user forums to analyze frequency of posts, number of responses, and the way responses generate discussion. 4. Criteria can include reach and quality. 5. Dias shares that he uses pre-built tools to discover who's talking about products and services online, and to analyze the resulting statistics. 6. Rating of the content that people provide can help find new influencers. (Using weighted rankings, where anonymous users = 1 pt and other influencers = 10 pts, is also helpful.) 7. Challenge: convincing users that involving themselves with your company does not equal "selling out." What value do you provide the influencers? 1. Incentives must be non-monetary. Examples: Microsoft MVP program, Walmart's "11 Moms"
  59. 59. 2. A "tree structure" can reward people for different kinds of activity within the community, such as "member of the week" or corporate rewards (e.g., Sun's "Duke Dollars") 3. Provide early access to new products/services. 4. Give influencers increasing levels of responsibilities (such as moderating comments). Organization must maintain "über-moderator," but much of the work can be sourced to the influencers. (Some attendees have had varying levels of success with this approach; seems to change with type of community.) How many people should be influencers? 1. Depends on criteria. Some felt their criteria might be too stringent. 2. If you just want enhanced feedback, examples are usually under a population of 500. For influencers, population is usually under 50. 3. The 1% - 9% - 90% pyramid was suggested as a guideline. 4. The size of the corporate group dealing with influencers can shrink if the community has a high level of trust with the organization. How can you extract people from other communities into your community? 1. Give people the opportunity to define themselves and port your company to their other activities. 2. Example: one participant wanted stronger participation in their online education community, but more discussion was taking place on an unofficial Facebook group. Just leave it there, or actively try to move it? a. Is this a problem? b. Are participants getting adequate value at community site? c. Are they having to give up too much? d. Are the FB users' expectations not matching with what the community offers? When Influencers Attack 1. Prepare for multiple scenarios when announcing a change. 2. Communicate ahead of time. 3. Have a specific point of content for questions. 4. Engage with negative commenters within the context that company has set up, not within the commenters' forum. 5. Expect emotional reactions, and know that a cooling-off period is helpful. 6. Are you listening to your influencers/users? 7. Are you acknowledging their concerns? 8. Do you have a process in place to weed out the trolls? (e.g., Walmart's customer service contacts 1-star reviewers; sometimes the review is fake) 9. Never lie. 10. It is easier to lose trust than build it. 11. Put it in perspective: what percentage of users are complaining? what percentage of complainers are influencers?
  60. 60. Big Community: Strategy Across Your Ecosystem (2I) Convener: Rachel Weidinger Notes-taker(s): Brenna Robertson, Google Other Members: Janet Fouts Lauren Klein Paul Wescott Angie Ryan Rajesh Pandey Jun Shim Bill Johnston Bonnie Ho Lori Anderson Jorge Dorantes Nathan Gwilliam Robb Miller Brenna Robertson Marie Girardet Jeremy Latimer Susan Tenby Lily Wong Katherine Kornas Jay MacIntosh Amy Muller Rachel Weidinger Discussion Notes: Good Practices identified with context, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: • How do you decide who is an influencer? o Watch over time and see who has a lot of followers, playing w/ influencer tracker things on Twitter. But now need to expand beyond Twitter. o Tracker tool. o Tracking influence on FB? No. • What's strategy to work across multiple platforms? o Twitter, Events. o OH community team manages this. • It's not about tracking people who are using different personas. • Have to understand the difference between the different medias / communities • You're not going to get anywhere saying the same thing to the same people across different networks. • Idea is to have one over-arching umbrella. Use one voice but tailor to different communities • Have a blog. Promote other blogs. LinkedIn. • Strategy - your intention and goals and what does your audience want to do? • Focus on 4 or 5 touch points and evaluate on a quarterly basis. • It'd be a mistake to spit things into a bunch of different communities. • Adjust the way that you write. Be aware of how you communicate and make it more personal. • Didn't plan how to measure and track before starting - figure out which metrics you're going to look at before you start!
  61. 61. • Does presence on Twitter and FB replace community forum? • Using TW to push out blog posts, and putting things on FB site • FB posts are getting more comments than forum. • Does it matter where it's coming in to? • If you can incorporate tagging, that helps • If the convos are happening everywhere, it's more impactful than bringing everyone back to you. • People are comfortable w/ the platform they know, so push the content to the different places. • How to combine? How to feed back to community? OpenID helps. • Is the center of gravity moving out to the public sphere? • Difference in strategy - do you want there to be more conversations about X or do you want to own the conversations about X? • If all the SM sites went away, what would your users want? • You need comm. platform to keep the conversation. • Have a place in your comm where you aggregate what's out there. • Aggregate other people's content to your network. Bring other communities to your network. • Do you get better data from the people who signed up on your site, rather than FB? • Yes, since you have user/acct info. Therefore, that's an argument to keeping comm in your site. • Is FB feedback diluted (since people aren't necessarily going there to discuss your topic)?the g • Conversations on FB are much better than on my site, b/c they're not influencers. More truthful b/c they don't have a specific agenda. • TCs response to FB and TW = build a better site on your own so you're not all over the place. They're very defensive and don't want to see us distribute convo. • Take a convo that starts on own community and then post on FB • At what point do you let presence on your comm go? How do you make that decision and how do you make it happen? • Weird when they announce on FB that they committed MySpace suicide. Just stop using MS instead. • But if you just stop w/o announcing, users think we don't care and aren't engaging. • Doesn't reflect well on company. • Tell people where to go instead, when you leave somewhere. • Switched FB group to FB page. Put a big note on group and had people go to page. Stop promoting. Don't want to get questions at place you left, and have users go w/o a response. • What's strategy, getting users engaged w/ each other? What's your involvement. You getting involved changes the convo b/t users. • How do you switch resources around when convo moves? • Intuit: FB presence, events. Have migrated Yahoo! content over to Intuit platform. Doing little things to drive traffic. • Goals: product support and marketing.
  62. 62. • Stay on mailing lists. Be able to recommend different resources that exist (not necessarily yours). Then chime in on lists every once in a while. • Opening conversation vs. owning conversation. • What's monetization strategy? Ad? Then you have to own convos. If you're just trying a brand, then it doesn't matter where the convo happens. • TW for cust support, PR, start convos about product. Works well. Mix of owning convo and just listening to dialogue. • Just important to be part of convo. It's not about the customer always coming to you. It's about finding the convo. • What happens when you go out to comm and participate in convo? • Everyone has a mic nowadays - so you can't control. You have to join in order to have some influence and participation. Then you gain credibility when they see that you're willing to go out and meet them where they are. This builds a great brand and PR. • No way to bring back to one place now. Have to have a strategy to manage multiple locations • People appreciate when you reach out to them via SM • Timing is good right now b/c people are cutting down on customer service. • Ebay housed the responsibility of listening to SM under Marketing, but marketing got cuts first, so that was the end of that. Should be under a communications group. • Should encourage all depts to participate • But, not all people are good at it, in which case it's OK for some people to go through one person (as opposed to all tweeting on their own). • How would you tell someone how to tweet? • Explain what to cover • Corp guidelines are good for SM engagement so everyone's comfortable. People want rules and examples. • What about people who are afraid of online identities? • Britney Spears example: she has a team that tweets under the same name, but they all sign w/ their own names. It's obvious when Britney tweets vs someone from her team. • Cotweet - use it. • ROI? • Track URLs you share so you can show that you added x people to list via Twitter link.
  63. 63. Social Psychology 101 for Community Managers (2J) Convener: Scott Moore Notes-taker(s): Scott Moore's Notes on the session, they do not reflect all that was discussed during the session Other Members: Terri Peluso Peter Thoney Perrine Crampton Heather Wong Carl Wakson Debbie Austin Zoya FAllah Melyssa Nelson Sara Leslie Chris Bailey BEcky Herdon Ganesha Bhaskara Aaron Favara Estee Solomon Gray Gail Ann Williams Keith Savageau Shana Brennan John Moore Discussion Notes: Good Practices identified with context, key understandings, outstanding questions, observations, and, if appropriate to this discussion: action items, next steps: Intro I am not a social scientists, just a Community Manager who has been learning as I go. I want to share the moments of, "I know that, it has a name?" with you. The format is on definitions, examples and some practical applications. The main goal is to get you started in learning from other disciplines. The secondary goal is to improve ourselves as community managers and participants as community members. (Additional notes: there is a community manager in Poland named Darek Kleczek who blogs at "Leadership in Social Networks" who was the inspiration for putting this into a specific form for community managers. He's worth keeping an eye one as he develops ideas about how we can encourage leaders to develop in our communities.) Fundamental Attribution Error Definition: People tend to presume the actions of others are indicative of the "kind" of person they are rather than their actions being caused by a situation. Based on experiment by Edward E. Jones and Victor Harris (1967). Coined by Lee Ross (1977). Sometimes called "correspondence bias", but not by all social scientists. Examples: Community makes error against their own: First time posters who make a social mistake being considered a troll. Community applies attribution error to community host: Considering the host uncaring/out of touch when tech changes occur suddenly or when the host makes a decision about Terms of Service (accused of playing favorites).

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