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  • We began our Educator Effectiveness Journey in August 2010 and our journey has consisted of many twists and turns.Next Slide
  • At the request of the superintendents from the CESA 6 area districts, CESA 6 School Improvement Services was given the charge of cooperatively leading a planning process so that the CESA 6 districts would have a CONSISTENT process to assist them to successfully recruit, hire, support, assess/ evaluate and train effective teachers and leaders.
  • So as we began the educator effectiveness journey we listened to what educators had to say about educator effectiveness. We conducted extensive research on effective vs. ineffective teaching and leadership. We studied the work of Danielson, Marzano, Saphier, Reeves, and Stronge regarding educator effectiveness, and we collaborated with the DPI, the SE Wisconsin Effectiveness Consortium, and multiple vendors, including Teachscape, Pearson, McKel, and OASYS.Next Slide
  • James Stronge and Associates was chosen by the CESA 6 school districts as the model for evaluation that would best suit the districts needs and help them to achieve their goals. Stronge and Associates research was used to frame the project, facilitate the design teams, prep the handbooks, and assist in providing training.
  • CESA 6 Effectiveness Project is an approved EQUIVALENCY PROCESS on the PRACTICES side of the 50/50.
  • The initial inspiration and design of the CESA 6 Effectiveness Project began in 2010…long before ACT 10 or the submission of the Wisconsin DPI Waiver Request. The project was initiated as a call to action in response to the research regarding effective vs. ineffective teaching and leading. The incredibly positive influence of highly effective teachers and school leaders on student achievement illuminated what educators as well as parents and students have always known: Highly effective teachers and school leaders make a BIG difference in levels of student success. Unfortunately, the research also illuminated the profoundly negative impact that ineffective teaching has on student learning. This research propelled CESA 6 leaders to create partnerships focused on the creation of a research-based, feasible, learning focused professional evaluation system for the educators that interact with our most precious resource: our children. The vision of an effective teacher in every classroom, and effective leader in every school, and an effective educational system in every community is truly a MORAL IMPERATIVE if all children are to succeed at high levels.
  • Increase educator effectivenessthrough the systematic articulation and implementation of a research-based, clearly articulated performance evaluation system for ALL educators within an educational organization; (teachers, educational specialists, school administrators, and eventually… district administrators, central office staff, para-professionals and others).Increase resource efficiencythrough the data-informed collaborative use of professional development resources (time, dollars and professional expertise) across schools, districts and regional CESAs.Insure system sustainability and fidelitythrough a pricing structure that allows equal access to all districts regardless of size and resource capacity; an implementation plan that provides extensive face-to-face and online training support focused increasing the leadership capacity of district-level leaders; and a regional support network to support ongoing systematic monitoring of fidelity implementation, inter-rater reliability and continuous improvement of the Effectiveness Project. While the focus of the CESA 6 Effectiveness Project © is certainly student achievement, the economy of increasing resource efficiency through the collaborative use of the resources of time, expertise and dollars is another imperative in these challenging times. The CESA 6 Effectiveness Project © provides the opportunity for data-driven, standards-focused professional development across grade levels, schools, districts and regionally. Further, the strong implementation plan and provision of ongoing training and support from regional CESA partners ensures that the system is implemented with fidelity.
  • See the “BOLD” words/phrases for the design commitments of the project.
  • According to the National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality, there are 8 components required of a comprehensive professional evaluation system. The CESA 6 Effectiveness Project meets all 8 requirements.System Goals – see previous 3 slidesStakeholder Involvement – approximately 140 educational professionals (teachers, educational specialists, principals, central office administrators, superintendents, post-secondary personnel, a BOE rep, a community rep, multiple WEAC reps and representation from DPI participated in design sessions and conversations. Each design team met for 4 full days to give input into each of the 3 professional evaluation systems: teacher, educational specialist and school administrator. Evaluation Format – See common structure across all systems (6 standards, common components, OASYS data management) on the next 8 slides.Strength of Measures: EP includes multiple measures of professional “practice” (observations, artifacts, surveys) and will incorporate the measures of student achievement as prescribed by the DPI. All data will be managed in the MyLearningPlan OASYS online data management systemEvaluator Training – ALL evaluators are trained in ALL of the systems (TPES, ESPES and SAPES) and attend (2) F2F inter-rater reliability trainings per year (formative and summative). Evaluators are also required to be “certified” as an EP Evaluator through the use of the MyLearningPlan ELEVATE, which will be implemented prior to formal roll out in 2014-15.Alignment with PD and Standards – Data gathered during the evaluation process will provide the basis for standards-based goals for professional development. This will be modeled during the upcoming training on MyLearningPlan OASYSData Infrastructure and Transparency – Both evaluator and evaluatee participate in the evaluation process and engage in shared dialog regarding the requirements of the evaluation process as it is managed in MyLearningPlan OASYS. Timelines for evaluation and the required components are clearly communicated and shared with both evaluator and evaluatee. Systems Evaluation – District “audits” will be conducted annually in the spring and data gathered as a result will inform potential revisions or adjustments to the system. Formal system evaluation will be conducted of all equivalent models by a non-bias party charged by the Department of Public Instruction.
  • The current tiers of professional evaluation included in the CESA 6 Effectiveness Project include teachers, educational specialists and school administrators. Note the comparability of the components utilized for evaluation. The components are very similar, yet allow for the unique roles and responsibilities of each position to be reflected in the process. The CESA 6 Process is much more that an observation process. These tiers or towers represented the data that is accumulated to document proficiency of each teacher, educational specialist and school administrator implementing the system.
  • Here is a sample of what one of the standards looks like on the summative evaluation form The evaluator will rate each standard using a “preponderance of evidence” from the multiple data sources. We will conduct additional training on this aspect to the system later in the year.
  • Pull it all together…The evaluator evaluation model (50:50) and the use of multiple data sources come together.
  • Diagram shows the relationship of support built into the implementation plan for the CESA 6 Effectiveness Project. The red arrows indicate the support relationships…ie: CESA Liaisons support EPICs, EPICs support Evaluators and Evaluatees, Evaluators support Evaluatee. NOTE: EPICs = Effectiveness Project Implementation CoachesAsk yourselves:Who am I in this system?Who are you in this system?What can we do together?
  • Overview of Annual Effectiveness Project© Trainings. TPES – Teacher Professional Evaluation SystemESPES – Educational Specialist Professional Evaluation SystemSAPES – School Administrator Evaluation System
  • The whole process is completed throughand the accumulation of data is housed in the MLP – OASYS system
  • Home page/Log in for MLPOASYS

03.1.14 weac.cp 2 03.1.14 weac.cp 2 Presentation Transcript

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  • Assist districts to successfully recruit, hire, support, assess / evaluate and retain effective teachers and leaders. 2
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  • We collaborated with National Experts: Heritage professor in the Educational Policy, Planning, and Leadership Area at the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia. James Stronge and Associates, LLC • • • • • • • share the research, frame the project, facilitate the design teams, deliver the handbooks, develop training materials, and provide the first wave of trainings CESA 6 has “restricted copyright” for all districts in Wisconsin 4
  • Wisconsin Act 166 – March 15, 2012 Equal weight: 50% on effective practice 50% will be based on student outcomes. 5
  • Created a system that focuses on a balance between: PROCESS Practices Behaviors Knowledge & Skills Strategies PRODUCT Student Achievement Growth & Attainment • Assures accountability of both teachers & evaluators • Provide standards-based, performance-driven professional development 6
  • CESA EP: A State Approved Equivalency Process… for the Educator PRACTICES 7
  • The Vision…. The OVERARCHING VISION of the CESA 6 Effectiveness Project© is to increase student achievement by insuring there is  an effective teacher in every classroom,  an effective leader in every school, and  an effective educational system in every community. 8
  • The Goals … Increase educator effectiveness Increase resource efficiency Insure system sustainability and fidelity 9
  • The Core Beliefs…. The CESA 6 Effectiveness Project© is: research-based designed around multiple measures of evidence standards-driven customizable to accommodate district culture and initiatives feasible (focused, not cumbersome) consistent in format across all levels of performance evaluation designed, implemented, monitored and revised in partnership with the educational leaders supported by a high quality, web-  equivalent to the Wisconsin Educator based data management system Effectiveness Framework per requirements of Act 166. (Application due April 19, 2013 – Approval by June 15, 2013) 10
  • Components of a Comprehensive Evaluation System 11
  • A Multi-tiered Professional Evaluation System for Educators Note: Superintendent and Central Office Evaluation Systems on deck for design - Spring 2014 12
  • CESA 6 Effectiveness Project Performance Evaluation System Effectiveness is the goal. Evaluation is merely the means. 13
  • Teacher Performance Standards 1. Professional Knowledge The teacher demonstrates an understanding of the curriculum, subject content, and diverse needs of students by providing meaningful learning experiences. 2. Instructional Planning The teacher effectively plans using the approved curriculum, instructional strategies, resources, and data to meet the needs of all students. 3. Instructional Delivery The teacher effectively engages students in learning by using a variety of instructional strategies in order to meet individual learning needs. 4. Assessment of/for Learning The teacher systematically gathers, analyzes, and uses relevant data to measure student progress, guide instructional content and delivery methods, and provide timely feedback to both students, parents, and stakeholders. 5. Learning Environment The teacher uses resources, routines, and procedures to provide a respectful, safe, positive, studentcentered environment that is conducive to student engagement and learning. 6. Professionalism The teacher demonstrates behavior consistent with legal, ethical, and professional standards, contributes to the profession, and engages in professional growth that results in improved student learning. 14
  • Educational Specialist Performance Standards 1. Professional Knowledge The educational specialist uses professional knowledge to address the needs of the target learning community while demonstrating respect for individual differences, cultures, and learning needs. 2. Communication and Collaboration The educational specialist communicates and collaborates effectively with learners, families, staff, and the community to promote student learning and well-being. 3. Assessment The educational specialist gathers, analyzes, and uses data to determine learner/program needs, measure learner/program progress, guide instruction and intervention, and provide timely feedback to learners, families, staff, and community. 4. Program Planning and Management The educational specialist effectively plans, coordinates, and manages programs and services consistent with established guidelines, policies, and procedures. 5. Program Delivery The educational specialist uses professional knowledge to implement a variety of services for the targeted learning community. 6. Professionalism The educational specialist demonstrates behavior consistent with legal, ethical, and professional standards, contributes to the profession, and engages in professional growth. 15
  • School Administrator Performance Standards 1. Leadership for Student Learning The school administrator drives the success of each learner through collaborative implementation of a shared vision of teaching and learning that leads to student academic progress and school improvement. 2. School Climate The school administrator fosters the success of all students by advocating, developing, nurturing, and sustaining a safe, positive, and academically engaging school climate. 3. Organizational Management The school administrator fosters the success of all students by supporting, managing, and overseeing the school’s organization, operation, and use of resources. 4. Human Resources Management The school administrator provides effective leadership in the area of human resources by assisting with selection and induction, and by supporting, developing, evaluating, and retaining quality instructional and support personnel. 5. Communication and Community Relations The school administrator fosters the success of all students by effectively communicating, collaborating, and engaging stakeholders to promote understanding, support, and continuous improvement of the school’s programs and services aligned with the school’s vision. 6. Professionalism The school administrator fosters the success of all students by demonstrating behavior consistent with legal, ethical, and professional standards, engaging in continuous professional development, and contributing to the profession. 16
  • Main Components Performance Standard Standard 2: Instructional Planning The teacher effectively plans using the approved curriculum, instructional strategies, resources, and data to meet the needs of all students. Sample Performance Indicators Performance Indicators Examples may include, but are not limited to: The teacher: 2.1 Align lesson objectives to approved curriculum using student learning data to guide planning. 2.2 Plans accordingly for pacing, sequencing content coverage, transitions, and application of knowledge. 2.3 Plans for differentiated instruction. 2.4 Develops appropriate long- and short-range plans, and adapts plans when needed. Performance Appraisal 2.5 Uses resources, including technology, to effectively communicate with stakeholders Rubric regarding curriculum shared in their classrooms. Distinguished Effective In addition to meeting the Requirements for Effective … Effective is the expected level of performance. The teacher actively seeks and uses alternative data and resources, and regularly differentiates plans and modifies instruction to meet the needs of all students. The teacher plans using the approved curriculum, instructional strategies, resources, and data to meet the needs of all students. Developing Needs Improvement The teacher inconsistently uses the curriculum, effective strategies, resources, or data in planning to meet the needs of all students. Unacceptable The teacher does not plan, or plans without adequately using the curriculum, or without using effective strategies, resources, or data to meet the needs of all students. 17
  • Sample Summative Evaluation Form (abbreviated) Distinguished Effective In addition to meeting the requirements for Effective… Effective is the expected level of performance. The teacher consistently demonstrates extensive content and pedagogical knowledge, regularly enriches the curriculum, and guides others in enriching the curriculum. The teacher demonstrates an understanding of the curriculum, subject content, and diverse needs of students by providing meaningful learning experiences. Developing /Needs Improvement The teacher inconsistently demonstrates an understanding of curriculum, subject content, and student needs, or lacks fluidity in using the knowledge in practice. Unacceptable The teacher inadequately demonstrates an understanding of curriculum, subject content, and student needs, or does not use the knowledge in practice. Evidence: 18
  • Terms used in Rating Scale Category Description Definition Distinguished The teacher maintains performance, accomplishments, and behaviors that consistently surpass the established standard. • Sustains high performance over period of time • Behaviors have strong positive impact on learners and school climate • May serve as role model to others Effective The teacher meets the standard in a manner that is consistent with the school’s mission and goals. • Meets the requirements contained in job description as expressed in evaluation criteria • Behaviors have positive impact on learners and school climate • Willing to learn and apply new skills Developing/ Needs Improvement The teacher is inconsistent in meeting standards and/or in working toward the school’s missions and goals. • Requires support in meeting the standards • Results in less than quality work performance • Leads to areas for teacher improvement being jointly identified and planned between teacher and evaluator Unacceptable The teacher consistently performs below the established standards or in a manner that is inconsistent with the school’s missions and goals. • Does not meet requirements contained in job description as expressed in evaluation criteria • Results in minimal student learning • May contribute to recommendation for teacher 19 not being considered for continued employment
  • Multiple Data Sources 1.Observations 2. Surveys 3.Goal Setting 4.Artifacts in a Documentation Log 5.Self Reflections Teacher /Educ. Specialist Evaluation 20
  • 50 PRACTICE  Observations  Surveys  Teacher Artifacts in Documentation Log  Self Assessments  Write Professional Goals (2/year) Use: Performance Standards and Indicators : 50 OUTCOMES  Write Student Learning Objectives (SLO) (2/ year) Use: Student Data
  • Roles and Responsibilities Evaluatees: Teachers, Ed. Specs & School Administrators Evaluators : Work collaboratively and reflectively with evaluators and provide evidence of their effective practices Implement evaluation process for teachers, educational specialists & school Internal or External admins . with fidelity. Evaluators support evaluatees. EPICs: Provide implementation support to both & evaluators and evaluatees – Teacher trainings Internal or OASYS External Evaluators: CESA Liaison: CESA TOTs: 16 hours of district-level support per year – Configuration, OASYS, Audit Regional CESA s provide Effectiveness Project© trainings for regional districts 22
  • The Effectiveness Project© Training and Annual PD Overview Initial Year training for Evaluators: Systems Training - REQUIRED (3 Days) •2 days INITIAL TRAINING: TPES, ESPES, SAPES, and MLP – OASYS. •1 day Connecting the 50:50 (Goals/SLOs) Initial and Annual F2F Calibration Inter-rater Reliability Training and Prep for ELEVATE ASSESSMENT… REQUIRED (2 Days) School Administrators / Directors: •1 day Formative (Dec/Jan) (Teachers & ES) •1 day Summative (April/May) (Teachers & ES) Additional EPIC Trainings (4 Days) Topic Options: •OASYS support & resources •Coaching techniques •Assessment literacy •SLO training & support •Data analysis & PD Planning •Others as determined by survey of EPIC needs Superintendents: •1 day Formative (Dec/Jan) (School Admin) •1 day Summative (April/May) (School Admin) 23
  • We Established a Relationship with: MyLearningPlan® OASYSSM, a web-based Observation and Appraisal Management System, offers district leaders Fast and Easy scheduling, managing, completing, and reporting of all components of the evaluation process for teachers, principals, administrators and noninstructional staff, including: • Classroom observations • Informal walkthroughs • Self-reflective assessments • Student learning objectives • Student growth data • Portfolio evaluation • Individual or team action research • Any custom components • MyLearningPlan OASYS is iPad™, iPod Touch™, iPhone™ & Android™ compatible. 24
  • MyLearningPlanOASYS 25