IBM Accessible Air Travel Kiosk
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Presentation on IBM Accessible Air Travel Kiosk, delivered on September 12, 2011 at the US Access Board Public Meeting in Dallas, Texas.

Presentation on IBM Accessible Air Travel Kiosk, delivered on September 12, 2011 at the US Access Board Public Meeting in Dallas, Texas.

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  • Collage of images including two "IBM100" logos for Accessible Workplace and Innovating the Self-Service Kiosk, and "THINK" motto with images of an x-ray, game console, researchers, female profile, and buildings
  • Collage of images including an older man using laptop, Asian businesswoman and businesswoman in wheelchair using a mobile device while a male co-worker looks on
  • Collage of IBM self-service air travel kiosk products including two different kinds of enclosures (large free-standing and table-top versions), Kiosk Manager 4.2.41 user interface, and Kiosk Check-In Application user interface
  • Research: Image of blind man using air travel self-service kiosk with headsets on, and listing of two key research reports: (1) The need for accessible self-service travel kiosks, IBM Human Ability & Accessibility Center (2008); and (2) Accessible self-service kiosks can help companies innovate, Check-In: The Magazine (2008). Standards: Image of checklist and human head silhouette showing brain with gears, and listing of three key standards activities: (1) HW Self Contained, Closed Product Guidelines, IBM Human Ability & Accessibility Center (2001); (2) Input to US Section 508 Standards (1998, 2008); (3) Participation in IATA CUSS Accessibility Dialogue (2007). Solutions: Image of US Postal Automated Postal Center accessible kiosk with three key IBM solutions listed: (1) Automated Postal Center® Kiosk (IBM), Trace Center Case Study (2004); (2) Accessible Travel Kiosk, Design@IBM Gallery (2007); (3) Accessible Self-Checkout, Design@IBM Gallery (2009).
  • The USPS’ Section 508 Program’s GUIDANCE is helping support development of accessible IT systems that are providing value beyond compliance. For example, the Postal Service’s Automated Postal Centers (APCs) are an award-winning kiosk that has been designed with Section 508 compliance in mind. Postal customers can access 80% of transaction types available at full-service Post Office retail counters from these kiosks, allowing Postal workers to concentrate on more complex transactions. The USPS Automated Postal Center offers a touch screen with extended accessibility features that make it possible for citizens with disabilities to use it. For example, IBM implemented a headset jack and Embedded ViaVoice (http://www-306.ibm.com/software/pervasive/embedded_viavoice_enterprise/) to support speech output of onscreen text for people who are blind or visually-impaired. An innovative 4-button keypad from University of Wisconsin Trace Research Center, called EZ Access®, was combined with the voice output to provide complete access to any onscreen text, images and controls for people who cannot see, cannot read, cannot reach the screen, or cannot make fine movements with their arms, hands, or fingers. The Automated Postal Centers kiosks are providing much VALUE BEYOND COMPLIANCE. They have helped increase Postal Service revenue and exceeded all financial targets. The remote network monitoring has helped the Postal Service reduce replenishment costs versus the traditional approach to scheduled service visits. As a side note, JANET WEBSTER – the Manager Retail Service Network and Access Management for the Postal Service – was named Deployer / Leader of the Year* and was recognized for the strategic role she has played in driving the Postal Service’s retail kiosk deployment. The Automated Postal Center Kiosks have also been awarded THREE 1st PLACE AWARDS in a prestigious industry competition: (1) Best Kiosk Deployment in a Retail Environment - Large Deployment (100+ Kiosks); (2) Best Kiosk Deployment for a Government Agency; (3) Best New Kiosk Deployment - Large Deployment (100+ Kiosks). SOURCE: Kioskcom.com Annual Awards (2005): http://www.kioskevents.com/awards/awards2005winners.aspx"
  • Examples of Usage [Figure 1: Image of a blind man with headset using the Accessible IBM Airline Self-Service Kiosk at CSUN 2008. The person has tactilely located the EZ Access® keypad and is using it and the speech output to complete the check-in transaction.] [Figure 2: Photo of John D. Kemp, Executive Director & General Counsel, US Business Leadership Network, using the Accessible IBM Airline Self-Service Kiosk with his prosthetic hand while seated in his wheelchair.]
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – Attract Screen [Screen shot showing screen with “Self-Service Check-In: Check-In Here… Touch Screen to Begin” attract loop] To begin, the customer needing access features tactilely locates the headset jack then plugs in their headset. The common airport or airline software then activates the speech output and gives general directions to the customer.
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – We Need to Find Your Reservation Screen [Screen shot showing screen that conveys to passenger one means to find their reservation] Audio automatically plays at the beginning of each screen. Here the customer tactilely locates the card reader then inserts the credit card used to make the reservation. The EZ Access® diamond-shaped button (circled in this graphic) can be pressed once to repeat the directions or held down longer to get more extensive help.
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – Please Wait… Screen [Screen shot showing animation and message “please wait” while the system finds the reservation]
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – We Need More Information to Find Your Reservation Screen [Screen shot showing screen that offers the passenger an alternative way – entry of a flight number – in order to find their reservation] On user input type screens, the customer navigates using UP and DOWN buttons, then selects the specific numbers using the ROUND button. It is important to speak aloud any elements that change on-screen so the user doesn’t have to excessively navigate – for example, the flight number text input here…
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – We Need More Information to Find Your Reservation Screen (continued) [Screen shot showing screen that offers the passenger an alternative way – entry of a flight number – in order to find their reservation]
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – We Need More Information to Find Your Reservation Screen (continued) [Screen shot showing screen that offers the passenger an alternative way – entry of a flight number – in order to find their reservation]
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – We Need More Information to Find Your Reservation Screen (continued) [Screen shot showing screen that offers the passenger an alternative way – entry of a flight number – in order to find their reservation]
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – Please Wait… Screen [Screen shot showing animation and message “please wait” while the system finds the reservation]
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – Select Passengers Checking In Now Screen [Screen shot showing a list with checkboxes that allow the passenger to select which passengers associated with the found reservation are checking in now] On selection-type screens, the customer navigates using UP and DOWN buttons, then selects the specific items they want to select or deselect using the ROUND button. It is important to speak aloud any additional information such as the check-in or infant-in-arms status, along with whether the input is selected or not…
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – Select Passengers Checking In Now Screen (continued) [Screen shot showing a list with checkboxes that allow the passenger to select which passengers associated with the found reservation are checking in now]
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – Select Passengers Checking In Now Screen (continued) [Screen shot showing a list with checkboxes that allow the passenger to select which passengers associated with the found reservation are checking in now]
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – Select Passengers Checking In Now Screen (continued) [Screen shot showing a list with checkboxes that allow the passenger to select which passengers associated with the found reservation are checking in now]
  • Accessible IBM Airline Check-In Kiosk Demo – Review Itinerary & Seat Selections Screen [Screen shot showing the segments (e.g. flights) associated with the retrieved itinerary in a table format with flight number, from city, to city, departure time and arrival time. Also, a table showing passenger seat selections for all passengers checking in for the itinerary is shown as well.] The customer presses the EZ Access® DOWN button to first review the segment in their itinerary then review seat selections for all passengers checking in now. Note that complex tables are used here and the audio needs to convey table headers so the customer can understand the screen and finish their transaction quickly..
  • Collage of three images: (1) sun disappearing behind globe with data; (2) hands joined between diverse business people; (3) floor with shadows.
  • Collage of three images: (1) sun disappearing behind globe with data; (2) hands joined between diverse business people; (3) floor with shadows.

IBM Accessible Air Travel Kiosk Presentation Transcript

  • 1. IBM Accessible Air Travel Kiosk
  • 2. Topics
    • IBM – A Century of Innovation
    • Accessible Air Travel Kiosk
      • Background
      • Components
      • Demonstration
      • Benefits
    • Industry Considerations
    • Questions & Answers
  • 3. IBM – A Century of Innovation
  • 4. IBM – A Century of Innovation
    • 2011 marks IBM’s Centennial Year
    • IBM “Icons of Progress” include:
      • Accessible Workforce (e.g. progressive employment practices as early as 1914, pioneering accessible technology solutions, employee retention / advancement)
      • Innovating the Self-Service Kiosk (e.g. magnetic stripe technologies, early ATMs, leadership in multiple industries, features including accessibility)
  • 5. IBM Human Ability & Accessibility Center Mission Enhancing human ability through technology innovation , so everyone can maximize their potential, regardless of age or ability.
  • 6. Supporting Harmonized Accessibility Standards
    • IBM has long history of leadership / participation in worldwide governmental and NGOs that develop accessibility standards
      • US Access Board: (1) Vice-Chair, EITAAC 508 (1998-99); (2) Member, TEITAC 508 Refresh (2008-09)
      • Canada: Contribution to Ontarians with Disabilities Act Standards
      • Global: (1) Founding sponsor of W3C Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) ; (2) Key roles on Steering Council & Web Content, Authoring Tools, User Agent Guidelines Work Groups; (3) Membership in total of 20+ groups (e.g. IMS, ISO, etc.)
    • Benefits of harmonized accessibility standards
    • Companies can devote more resources to R&D of accessible products
    • Accessible I/T will be available to more people worldwide
  • 7. IBM Accessible Kiosk – Background
  • 8. IBM is a Leading Supplier of Airport/Airline Kiosks
    • Track Record
      • World leader in travel kiosk market
      • Solutions delivered to 70+ air travel clients
    • Proven Technologies
      • Scalability, performance, availability
      • End-to-end offerings: Enclosures/HW, Kiosk Mgmt SW, Kiosk/Mobile Check-In Apps
      • Some sold via partners (e.g. Enclosures)
    • Proven Approach
      • Single point of accountability
      • Conforms to IATA Common Use Self-Service (CUSS) Standard, which IBM contributes to
    • Customer Focus
      • Multi-channel strategy provides for an enhanced user experience
      • In 2007, we developed accessibility features
  • 9. IBM Leadership in Accessible Self-Service Kiosks Research
    • Need for accessible self-service travel kiosks , IBM (2008)
    • Accessible self-service kiosks can help companies innovate , Check-In Magazine (2008)
    Standards
    • HW Self Contained, Closed Product Guidelines , IBM (2001)
    • Input to US Section 508 Standards (1999, 2009)
    • Participation in IATA CUSS Accessibility Dialogue (2007)
    Solutions
    • Automated Postal Center® Kiosk , Trace Center Study (2004)
    • Accessible Travel Kiosk , Design@IBM (2007)
    • Accessible Self-Checkout , Design@IBM (2009)
  • 10. IBM Accessibility Guidelines – Kiosk Products
    • Controls and latches
      • Controls / latches should be reachable, operable with one hand / minimal dexterity
      • Provide alternative forms of user identification for biometric identification
      • Provide alternative input methods for touchscreens or touch-operated controls
      • Products shall be usable by PWDs without requiring an end-user to attach assistive technology to the product
    • Keys and Keypads
      • Provide status of all locking or toggle keys visually and either through touch or sound
      • Provide keys which are tactilely discernible without activating them
      • If key repeat supported, delay before repeat shall be adjustable to at least 2 seconds. Key repeat rate shall be adjustable to 2 seconds per character
    • Color and Contrast
      • Use color as enhancement, not as only way to convey info or distinguish keys, controls and labels
      • If user can adjust color / contrast , provide range of selections capable of producing a variety of contrast levels
    • Audio
      • Provide ability to adjust volume , function to reset volume to default after every use
      • Provide industry standard audio connector to allow for private listening, with ability to interrupt, pause, and restart the audio
    • Timing
      • Provide alert before timed responses expire and allow the user to indicate more time is needed
      • Avoid causing the screen to flicker with a frequency greater than 2 Hz and lower than 55 Hz
    Guideline examples from IBM Hardware Self-Contained, Closed Products Guidelines
  • 11. US Postal Service Automated Postal Center®
    • Award-winning custom retail POS kiosk engineered by IBM offers superior accessibility, innovative speech output and EZ Access® Keypad… similar techniques now being leveraged for IBM retail and travel industry applications!
    • Benefits
    • Customers access 80% of transaction types of full-service retail counter – workers can concentrate on more complex transactions
    • APCs exceeded financial targets, helped increase USPS revenue ($170M by 03/24/05 – investment paid back within first year)
    • Remote network monitoring has helped reduce replenishment costs vs. traditional approach to scheduled service visits
    • 96% APC users find APC easy to use (rate “very good” to “excellent”)
    • 27% APC transactions occur after lobby closed (after-hours value)
    • Allows PWDs to access services without assistance from workers
    EZ® and EZ Access® are registered trademarks of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF). Licensing and trademark information can be obtained by contacting the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation
  • 12. IBM Accessible Kiosk – Components
  • 13. IBM Accessible Air Travel Kiosk Components EZ® and EZ Access® are registered trademarks of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF). Licensing and trademark information can be obtained by contacting the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Hardware EZ Access® Keypad Enclosures Audio Connector Platform Software IBM CUSS Platform Speech Output IBM Kiosk Manager Check-In Software Apps Mobile Check-In Apps Kiosk Check-In App
  • 14. IBM Accessible Air Travel Kiosk – Hardware EZ® and EZ Access® are registered trademarks of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF). Licensing and trademark information can be obtained by contacting the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Enclosures
    • Accessible reach ranges
    • Touch screen not heat sensitive (usable w/ prosthetics)
    • Braille labels when required
    • Can include cane rest, grab bar, tactilely discernable accessories
    EZ Access® Keypad
    • 5 or 8 button EZ Access® Keypad integrated or connected externally
    • Tactilely discernable keys without activating, operable with one hand, no pinch/twist/grasp required
    • Dedicated help key
    • Universal shapes/symbols/colors
    Audio Connector
    • Can be used with headphones, amplifiers, audio couplers
    • Volume control, 4-5 levels
    • Plug in detectable by SW
    • Automatic reset to default level after each use
  • 15. IBM Accessible Air Travel Kiosk – Software EZ® and EZ Access® are registered trademarks of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF). Licensing and trademark information can be obtained by contacting the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation IBM CUSS Platform
    • Detect headset connection
    • Audio volume control
    • Automatic volume reset
    • Interface to keypad device
    • Screen highlighting logic
    • Other EZ Access interface rules
    Text-to-Speech (TTS)
    • Leading TTS component from IBM Business Partner Nuance
    • Easy integration of recorded prompts and TTS
    • Multi-lingual support with industry’s largest language portfolio (35+ languages)
    • Voices and languages configured by data files
    Kiosk Check-In App
    • TTS output for all content and controls
    • 3 levels of layered audio help (app level, screen level, HW/output, integrated with EZ Access® Help key) – “any key” stop
    • Audio feedback on activation of controls
    • On-screen focus indicator
    • Consistent non-visual method to support navigation (EZ Access® Up, Down, Enter)
    • ALT text to describe meaningful graphics
    • Timeout warnings (audio + visual)
  • 16. Examples of Usage EZ® and EZ Access® are registered trademarks of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF). Licensing and trademark information can be obtained by contacting the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Figure 1: Image of a blind man with headset using the IBM Accessible Air Travel Kiosk at CSUN 2008. The person has tactilely located the EZ Access® keypad and is using it with the TTS output to complete the check-in transaction. Figure 2: Photo of John D. Kemp, now the President & CEO, Abilities!, using the Accessible IBM Airline Self-Service Kiosk with his prosthetic hand while seated in his wheelchair at CSUN 2008.
  • 17. IBM Accessible Kiosk – Demonstration
  • 18. To begin, the customer needing access features tactilely locates the headset jack then plugs in their headset. The common airport or airline software then activates the speech output and gives general directions to the customer.
  • 19. Audio automatically plays at the beginning of each screen. Here the customer tactilely locates the card reader then inserts the credit card used to make the reservation. The EZ Access® diamond-shaped button can be pressed once to repeat the directions or held down longer to get more extensive help.
  • 20.  
  • 21. 1 On user input type screens, the customer navigates using UP and DOWN buttons, then selects the specific numbers using the ROUND button. It is important to speak aloud any elements that change on-screen so the user doesn’t have to excessively navigate – for example, the flight number text input here…
  • 22. 1 2 On user input type screens, the customer navigates using UP and DOWN buttons, then selects the specific numbers using the ROUND button. It is important to speak aloud any elements that change on-screen so the user doesn’t have to excessively navigate – for example, the flight number text input here…
  • 23. 1 2 3 1 2 On user input type screens, the customer navigates using UP and DOWN buttons, then selects the specific numbers using the ROUND button. It is important to speak aloud any elements that change on-screen so the user doesn’t have to excessively navigate – for example, the flight number text input here…
  • 24. 1 2 3 On user input type screens, the customer navigates using UP and DOWN buttons, then selects the specific numbers using the ROUND button. It is important to speak aloud any elements that change on-screen so the user doesn’t have to excessively navigate – for example, the flight number text input here…
  • 25.  
  • 26. On selection-type screens, the customer navigates using UP and DOWN buttons, then selects the specific items they want to select or deselect using the ROUND button. It is important to speak aloud any additional information such as the check-in or infant-in-arms status, along with whether the input is selected or not…
  • 27.  On selection-type screens, the customer navigates using UP and DOWN buttons, then selects the specific items they want to select or deselect using the ROUND button. It is important to speak aloud any additional information such as the check-in or infant-in-arms status, along with whether the input is selected or not…
  • 28.  On selection-type screens, the customer navigates using UP and DOWN buttons, then selects the specific items they want to select or deselect using the ROUND button. It is important to speak aloud any additional information such as the check-in or infant-in-arms status, along with whether the input is selected or not…
  • 29.   When the EZ Access® DOWN button is held down for a few seconds, the focus jumps to the last control on the screen (e.g. the Confirm Button).
  • 30. The customer presses the EZ Access® DOWN button to first review the segment in their itinerary then review seat selections for all passengers checking in now. Note that complex tables are used here and the audio needs to convey table headers so the customer can understand the screen and finish their transaction quickly..
  • 31. IBM Accessible Kiosk – Benefits
  • 32. Benefits for People of Varying Abilities X X Alternative text for meaningful graphics X Consistent non-visual method to support navigation among UI elements X X On-screen focus indicator X X Layered audio-based instructions accessible via dedicated “help” key at 3 levels X X Text-to-speech output for all software content and controls X X X EZ Access® keypad / tactilely discernable keys, operable with one hand, does not require twisting/pinching/grabbing, etc. X X X Standard audio connector with volume control and automatic reset to default Cognitive or Multi-lingual Deaf & Hard of Hearing Mobility & Dexterity Blind & Low Vision Feature
  • 33. Benefits for People of Varying Abilities (Cont’d) X X Mechanism to stop audio instructions when any keypad button or keyboard key is pressed X X X Timeout warnings in audio and visual form, with option to request more time, assistance if timeout occurs X X Audio-based description of elements that change on-screen (e.g. text input entered to form string) X X Audio feedback to indicate successful activation or selection of SW or HW controls X Captioning and audio description for any embedded videos Cognitive or Multi-lingual Deaf & Hard of Hearing Mobility & Dexterity Blind & Low Vision Feature
  • 34. Industry Considerations
  • 35. Considerations - Development of Policy & Standards for Accessible Air Travel Kiosks
    • Airline industry standards development
      • Accessibility standards should take into account key air travel technology standards such as IATA Common Use Self Service (CUSS), etc.
    • Phased, multi-vendor procurement
      • Airports often buy hardware / CUSS platform software (capital / facilities to be shared by airlines)
      • Airlines buy or build CUSS check-in apps and either install on their proprietary HW or airport HW
  • 36. Considerations - Development of Policy & Standards for Accessible Air Travel Kiosks (Cont’d)
    • Technology considerations
      • Rise of mobile in air travel industry / use in combination with kiosk access features
      • Use of different technologies to provide access features (e.g. ALT to touch screen)
    • Scoping
      • 1-2 units at a given location = all should be accessible?; 3+ units at a given location = certain % should be accessible?
      • Definition of “location” (e.g. airport, concourse)
      • Requirements relative to other customer service
  • 37. Questions & Answers
  • 38. Questions & Answers
    • We welcome questions regarding:
      • IBM Accessible Air Travel Kiosk
      • IBM Perspective on Multichannel Customer Experience in Travel
      • IBM Accessibility Practice
    • Contact Information
      • Bill Curtis-Davidson, IBM Human Ability & Accessibility Center ( [email_address] )
      • IBM Human Ability & Accessibility: http:// www.ibm.com /able/