So You Think You Can't Read Music!

  • 5,268 views
Uploaded on

Many people think that learning how to read music and play from music notation is too difficult. But it really isn't! In this Slideshare deck I explain what teachers can do to make increase the …

Many people think that learning how to read music and play from music notation is too difficult. But it really isn't! In this Slideshare deck I explain what teachers can do to make increase the success of their students in becoming confident readers who can play fluently from notation. I explore the difference between knowing only how to work out the music and instantly being able to recognise patterns and shapes - then being able to play them immediately on your instrument. I use this thinking to help music teachers reframe the way they teach, so they can help their students balance listening and reading, to become more independent as musicians. I hope teachers and students alike enjoy it!

More in: Education , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
5,268
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4

Actions

Shares
Downloads
52
Comments
1
Likes
8

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. SoYouThink You Can’t Read Music! Monday, 19 August 13
  • 2. Most instrumental learners do battle with reading traditional music notation (Learners’ flag) (Notation forces’ flag) Monday, 19 August 13
  • 3. Sadly, for some, the notation wins! Boo!! Monday, 19 August 13
  • 4. Students may try their best to learn how to work out pitches from the score rhythm values & Monday, 19 August 13
  • 5. But many give up on notation because they never get past the hesitant stage of playing from a score! Monday, 19 August 13
  • 6. Here’s what teachers can do about it... Monday, 19 August 13
  • 7. Make sure students can name & play (only) the notes they need* instantly & without hesitation Monday, 19 August 13
  • 8. instantly & without hesitation *Don’t try to teach them every note on the instrument before they need them Make sure students can name & play (only) the notes they need* Monday, 19 August 13
  • 9. Understanding the score is one thing. Knowing immediately what to do about it on your instrument is an additional skill! Monday, 19 August 13
  • 10. Stopping to work it out is the slowest way to play from a score: Monday, 19 August 13
  • 11. Instant Very slow RESPONSESPEED READING SKILL TYPES Knowing How* *KNOWING only HOW to work out elements on a score interrupts the performance. By this route, fluency is impossible. The goal must be to be able to respond instantly: by Knowing Stopping to work it out is the slowest way to play from a score: Monday, 19 August 13
  • 12. This is a much better way to play from a score: Monday, 19 August 13
  • 13. This is a much better way to play from a score: Instant Very slow RESPONSESPEED READING SKILL TYPES Knowing** Knowing How **KNOWING – ie, instantly recognising melodic patterns, chords & rhythms the performer has seen before. This means that fluency & flow are NOT interrupted. Monday, 19 August 13
  • 14. I grew up in a very musical family Rather like this one (but with perhaps more stride piano playing!) Monday, 19 August 13
  • 15. When I began learning piano (aged 5) I really struggled with reading notation Monday, 19 August 13
  • 16. I had perfect pitch but that meant my aural abilities were way ahead of my music reading Perform ing N otation reading Auralperception Ability High Low Monday, 19 August 13
  • 17. Playing from a score was frustrating & unpleasant for me (& for anyone unfortunate enough to hear me!) Monday, 19 August 13
  • 18. When I began piano exams my aural abilities still out-weighed my sight playing Monday, 19 August 13
  • 19. I didn’t pass the sight-reading until I reached grade 5! Hooray! Monday, 19 August 13
  • 20. It had dawned on me that I could play more fluently... Monday, 19 August 13
  • 21. CHUNKS of notation ...if I could recognise (Rhythm) (Pitch) Monday, 19 August 13
  • 22. CHUNKS of notation ...if I could recognise (rather than individual note events) (Rhythm) (Pitch) Monday, 19 August 13
  • 23. I also learned that staff notation was not as scary as it seemed!Photo: Creepyhalloween © stockarch.com Monday, 19 August 13
  • 24. Learning music just from notation is like trying to learn a language just from a book Photo:Headphones&Books©BillCMartin2013 Monday, 19 August 13
  • 25. Photo:MontmartrePubCrawl©ThomasSauzeddiviaFlickrCreativeCommons To improve your accent & understand culture & customs... Monday, 19 August 13
  • 26. you need conversations with genuine native speakers! Photo:MontmartrePubCrawl©ThomasSauzeddiviaFlickrCreativeCommons Monday, 19 August 13
  • 27. Playing with musicians who are better than you gives insights into how to play, not just what to play Cajun Jam Session © JC Winkler via Flickr Creative Commons Monday, 19 August 13
  • 28. It will help you develop an understanding of the music way beyond the note & rhythm information that the score provides Monday, 19 August 13
  • 29. It may also help you clarify what you might express that could make the music, well, more musical! Monday, 19 August 13
  • 30. The good news: staff notation is concerned mainly with 1. Pitch 2. Rhythm Monday, 19 August 13
  • 31. So I came to realise my notation‘dragon’ wasn’t scary at all! Monday, 19 August 13
  • 32. To become fluent when playing from a score, I needed to develop... Monday, 19 August 13
  • 33. An ability to recognise instantly shapes, patterns & phrases on the page Monday, 19 August 13
  • 34. As music teachers we can learn a lot from literacy teachers Children's Books © katerha via Flickr Creative Commons Monday, 19 August 13
  • 35. They know that children will read aloud, fluently, only when... Photo: Child Reading via MorgueFile Monday, 19 August 13
  • 36. shapes, patterns & words on the page ...they can recognise instantly Monday, 19 August 13
  • 37. And when they can understand the MEANING of what they’re reading Child Reading at Brookline Booksmith © Tim Pierce via Flickr Creative Commons Monday, 19 August 13
  • 38. So why do so many music teachers go no further than teaching students how to work out individual notation elements? Monday, 19 August 13
  • 39. In language, understanding phonics (or individual letter sounds) will only enable students to work out the words r + ea + d + ing Monday, 19 August 13
  • 40. It won’t drive reading fluency because 1. It’s not an instant process Monday, 19 August 13
  • 41. It won’t drive reading fluency because 1. It’s not an instant process 2. It isn’t built on comprehension Monday, 19 August 13
  • 42. Learning only how to work out individual note values & pitches... Monday, 19 August 13
  • 43. is like learning to read but only ever learning to recognise individual letters! “Wh o’ s b ee n ea t ing m y p o rr i dge? The result lacks fluency Monday, 19 August 13
  • 44. Almost ANY OTHER STRATEGY is quicker! Monday, 19 August 13
  • 45. So teachers, PLEASE be kind to your poor students! Don’t leave them armed with only... Monday, 19 August 13
  • 46. The ability to work out individual note values or pitches! Monday, 19 August 13
  • 47. It’s not enough & some learners will give up! Monday, 19 August 13
  • 48. Remember: Knowing only How to work it out won’t aid fluency Instant Very slow RESPONSESPEED READING SKILL TYPES Knowing How Monday, 19 August 13
  • 49. So help them achieve fluency through instant recognition Instant Very slow Knowing Knowing How Via regular routines & practice!RESPONSESPEED READING SKILL TYPES Monday, 19 August 13
  • 50. The first step? Teachers must set instant recognition as a goal Monday, 19 August 13
  • 51. To extend teachers’ skills I run workshops on how to do this in your teaching Monday, 19 August 13
  • 52. Choose either the 1-day workshop on improving notation reading Photo:Musicteachersattendingaworkshop©BillCMartin Monday, 19 August 13
  • 53. Or choose the Ears & Eyes workshop improving aural & reading skills teaching, in a single day Photo: Jazzwise Summer School 2008 © Bill C Martin Monday, 19 August 13
  • 54. It will extend your teaching skill set & greatly enhance your students’ reading, their playing capability & confidence Monday, 19 August 13
  • 55. Contact me for details bill@billcmartin.co.uk Phone: +44 (0)7718 122146 More Info: billcmartin.co.uk LinkedIn: billcmartin Twitter: @billcmartin Monday, 19 August 13