Bike culture and small towns
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presented at the South Dakota Bike Summit, Jan 22, 2011.

presented at the South Dakota Bike Summit, Jan 22, 2011.

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  • Lots of grassroots events put on by community. Bike moves (on left is a theater company that moved by bike), weekly breakfast on the bridges with donuts and coffee for bicyclists, Pedalpalooza (2-week bike festival with 15 – 20 events per day), bike polo, Slug Velo (slow bike rides) etc. 4000 events per year (average of 1 every 27 minutes).
  • Also major events like Bridge Pedal (left) with 20,000 participants, Cross Crusade (national cyclocross championship series), Tour de Fat.
  • SmartTrips – individualized marketing program that helps people drive less. 20,000 households per year. Invited to order customized packet of maps and brochures. Fun bike and walking events. Incentives and coupons. Results in 10% reduction in drive-alone trips at cost of about $20 per household.
  • Great transit integration – bikes can be brought on bus and rail at all times, no extra cost or permit needed. Has been too successful; demand far outstrips supply at this point. Good problem to have; agency is working on it now.
  • Bicycle Boulevard – low-traffic residential routes that have been optimized for cycling through traffic calming, vehicle barriers, crossing treatments, and wayfinding signs and markings. Great for group C cyclists – true “8 to 80” facility. Beautiful and low-stress riding environment.
  • Women on Bikes program – many women feel intimidated in bike shops. Series of workshops and group rides to get women started with bicycling and give them a social support network.
  • 3 consecutive Sundays in August, 7 mile loop. Huge success.
  • Excess street capacity converted into protected cycle tracks and public plazas
  • Annual day sponsored by Trust for Public Land to convert parking spaces into mini parks, highlight need for more public space.50 spaces in 2008 in NYC>
  • Great high-profile safety campaign aimed at drivers and cyclists
  • Great high-profile safety campaign aimed at drivers and cyclists
  • Great high-profile safety campaign aimed at drivers and cyclists
  • Great high-profile safety campaign aimed at drivers and cyclists
  • Great high-profile safety campaign aimed at drivers and cyclists
  • Great high-profile safety campaign aimed at drivers and cyclists
  • Suggestions for next steps:Continue to implement infrastructure as quickly as you can, enhance impact with complementary programsWork on many fronts – many types of efforts, many messages, many messengersFigure out how best to use all groups and individuals to work simultaneously on many frontsBest programs will:Increase cyclist visibilityBe fun and positive – more ‘sticky,’ more appealing, better for agency imageAppeal to non-cyclists

Bike culture and small towns Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Creating Bike Culture to Become a Platinum Bike Friendly City
    Creating Bike Culture to Become a Bike Friendly City
    Ann Freiwald
    Alta Planning + Design
  • 2. What is bike culture?
    Ridership
    Visibility
    Acceptance
    Pride
  • 3. How to get there?
    Policies and laws
    Leadership
    Plans
    Money invested
    Messages everywhere
    Infrastructure
    Programs
    Integrated “Five E’s”
    Many groups
  • 4. Four Types of Cyclists
    A
    B
    C
    D
    • A - Strong and fearless (<1%)
    • 5. B - Enthused and confident (7%)
    • 6. C - Interested but concerned (60%)
    • 7. D - No way, no how (33%)
  • 8. Copenhagen
    • Population: 509,861
    • 9. Bicycle Modeshare: 36% (Goal: 40%)
    • 10. Bikeway miles: 332 km of bikeways (206 miles)
    • 11. Crash risk has decreased 50% in 5 years
  • Bicycle Account
    • Modeshare data
    • 12. Crash and injury data
    • 13. User satisfaction
    • 14. Average speed
    • 15. Pavement quality ratings
    • 16. Bicycle facility miles
    • 17. Money spent on infrastructure
  • Immigrant Women
  • 18. Parking Reduction
  • 19. Green Wave
  • 20. Amsterdam
    • Population: 755,269
    • 21. Bicycle Modeshare: 37%
    • 22. Ridership trends: Steady since 1991
    • 23. Bikeway miles: 450 km (280 miles)
  • Youth education
  • 24. Bicycle Parking
  • 25. Bicycle Parking
  • 26. Lights On campaign
  • 27. Traffic Calming
  • 28. Branding
  • 29. Portland
    Population: 568,000
    Bicycle Modeshare:
    • 4.4% (2007 ACS)
    • 30. 8% (Citywide auditor’s survey)
    Bicycle usage increased 28% in 2008
    BFC Ranking: Platinum
    Bikeway miles: 270 miles of bikeways
    • 170 miles of bike lanes
    • 31. 31 miles of bicycle boulevards
    • 32. 67 miles of multi-use pathways
  • 33. Bicycle Art
  • 34. Bicycle Economy
  • 35. Bicycle Economy
  • 36. Kids & Families / SR2S
  • 37. Sunday Parkways
  • 38. Community Events
  • 39. Major Events
  • 40. Tourism
  • 41. SmartTrips
  • 42. Transit Integration
  • 43. Bicycle Boulevards
  • 44. Women on Bikes
  • 45. New York City
    Population: 8,274,527
    Bicycle Modeshare: less than 1%
    35% increase between 2007 and 2008
    BFC Ranking: Bronze
    Bikeway miles: 420 miles
  • 46. Summer Streets
  • 47. Reclaiming Streets
  • 48. Park(ing) Day
  • 49. LOOK! Campaign
  • 50. But Enough About the Big Cities…
  • 51. Fargo, ND
    Bike Lanes
  • 52. Fargo, ND
    Signed On-Street Connections
  • 53. Fargo, ND
    Shared Lane Marking on Broadway
  • 54. Fargo, ND
    Bike Corral
  • 55. 4 Types of Cyclists Revisited
    A
    B
    C
    D
    • A - Strong and fearless (<1%)
    • 56. B - Enthused and confident (7%)
    • 57. C - Interested but concerned (60%)
    • 58. D - No way, no how (33%)
  • Midwest Mode Share: Sample States
  • 59. Midwest Mode Share: Sample Cities
  • 60. Midwest Mode Share: Local Competition
  • 61. Infrastructure to complement programs
    Work on many fronts
    Who will do what?
    Key goals:
    Visibility
    Fun & Positive
    Encourage existing cyclists, education non-cyclists
    Next Steps
  • 62. Thank you!
    Ann Freiwald, ASLA
    Alta Planning + Design
    annfreiwald@altaplanning.com