Undergraduate Studies  ePortfolio Jennifer Barrios BA in Psychology, 2011
Personal Statement The   area   I   wish   to   specialize   in   is  Clinical and Counseling in Adolescent Psychology. I ...
Personal Statement I love helping people, and I feel very comfortable in any setting; I am good at communicating effective...
Resume WORK EXPERIENCE April 2011 – Present  Krohn and Moss, Ltd. (Paralegal)  Preparing and filing documents with variou...
Resume EDUCATION Argosy University ,  Degree Completion: 2011 Bachelors of Arts Degree in Psychology specialized in Crimin...
Reflection My experience at Argosy has been very different from any other study experiences I have had before. I  interact...
Reflection Strengths  Argosy has helped me  analyze the complexities of a given issue however I still need. I am now to co...
Reflection Weaknesses <ul><li>I still struggle when it comes to actually finding the sources, but I think this is somethin...
I am not a big fan of experimental psychology so research studies and presentations can sometimes make me struggle. I was ...
There are some ethical situations that I might not be familiar with because I have not been able to be active in the field...
I wish I would  have had more time to volunteer while I was studying in order to get a feel of how psychological concepts ...
I know that further studies requires further research, and this is something I will still have to struggle with. However, ...
Table of Contents Cognitive Abilities: Critical Thinking and Information Literacy Communication Skills: Oral and Written E...
Critical Thinking How   might   your   own   cultural ,  ethnic ,  or   family   values ,  rules ,  or   traditions   be  ...
Critical Thinking Dealing with resistance is a big part of the treatment of involuntary clients. What are some methods of ...
Critical Thinking ( CONTINUATION OF RESISTANCE DISCUSSION) It is important for counselors to recognize client's feelings a...
Critical Thinking ( CONTINUATION OF RESISTANCE DISCUSSION) Another reason a client exhibits resistant behaviors might be b...
Critical Thinking How   might   your   own   cultural ,  ethnic ,  or   family   values ,  rules ,  or   traditions   be  ...
Ethics and Diversity Awareness Why   is   culture   an   important   consideration   in   the   interview ,  assessment , ...
Ethics and Diversity Awareness How   might   your   own   cultural ,  ethnic ,  or   family   values ,  rules ,  or   trad...
Ethics and Diversity Awareness INTERVENTION AND ETHICS There   are   many   ethical   concerns   to   take   into   accoun...
Ethics and Diversity Awareness Another   ethical   concern   is   privacy .  Professionals   should   exercise   caution  ...
Foundations of Psychology Addiction   intervention   is   a   pre - planned   attempt   by   one   or   many   people   su...
Foundations of Psychology The   interventionist   needs   to   plan   what   he   or   she   is   going   to   say  &  men...
Applied Psychology Do you believe in &quot;repressed memory or not? I do believe in repressed memory.  A   person   subjec...
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  1. 1. Undergraduate Studies ePortfolio Jennifer Barrios BA in Psychology, 2011
  2. 2. Personal Statement The area I wish to specialize in is Clinical and Counseling in Adolescent Psychology. I want to assess and treat adolescents with psychological problems and crises . I am very interested in the development and advancement of adolescent psychology as a means of improving the welfare and mental health of youth and their families. I am also interested because I see adolescence as a good time to try guide an individual. Once an individual enters into adulthood, things can be more difficult for both the individual and the treating therapist. Negative mental concepts individuals have developed into deeper stages as in contrast with adolescents where these negative concepts are still in their earlier stages and can still be modified or removed .
  3. 3. Personal Statement I love helping people, and I feel very comfortable in any setting; I am good at communicating effectively with a group, with just one other person, and by using words in writing. I like talking and listening to others. I think this is crucial for the profession I am pursuing. I place high importance on values such as: commitment, compassion, connection, determination, encouragement, enthusiasm, focus, persistence, and willingness. All of these values are important in different and most stages of our lives, especially when engaging with other individuals. Overall, I have a big desire to help pre-adolescents and adolescents because they are the future of our society. I want to help this specific group because they are sometimes very confused and lost when it comes to what they need to do with themselves and they seek very drastic alternate measures to “fix” their situations. I want to help guide them, and I want to help them realize their full potential, and help them focus on their dreams. I need to pursue for higher education in order to obtain the knowledge and tools to achieve these goals in the best way possible.
  4. 4. Resume WORK EXPERIENCE April 2011 – Present  Krohn and Moss, Ltd. (Paralegal) Preparing and filing documents with various Courts (State and Federal) for a Lemon law practice; Drafting/formatting/typing various legal documents and correspondence; Scheduling appointments and calendaring case dates; Answering heavy telephones, screening calls, emails and messages; Opening and closing cases; Indexing cases; and providing translation services. Also responsible for the oversight of client services by ensuring rapid response and high satisfaction levels for clients. May, 2009 – April 2011  Tax Lawyers Consulting Group, APC, Los Angeles, CA (Paralegal) Responsible for performing legal research, analyzing, drafting and filing documents related to Federal Income Tax issues; Drafting and filing various legal documents and correspondence; Scheduling appointments and calendaring case dates; Answering heavy telephone; Screening calls, emails and messages; Opening and closing cases; Indexing cases; Also responsible for the oversight of client services by ensuring rapid response and high satisfaction levels for clients. May 2008 – May 2009  Barnes’s & Noble, Los Angeles, CA (Sales Assistant)) Responsible for customer service, ensuring rapid response and high satisfaction levels for all customers. Providing support regarding availability and locations of products within the store while utilizing proprietary company software; Answering heavy phones; Inputting data entry; Heavy cash handling; Providing back up to team members, as needed to meet deadlines and maximize efficiency; Resolving customer complaints with tact and understanding of customer concerns. December 2007 – April 2008  Food4Less, Los Angeles, CA (Bookkeeper/Cashier) Providing support for store manager, including creating daily income/loss report, assisting with general ledger entries, processing vendor/distributor invoices for payment and other accounting tasks; Data entry, Answering heavy telephones; Preparing cash pickup; Researching discrepancies and communicating corrective action; General customer service .
  5. 5. Resume EDUCATION Argosy University , Degree Completion: 2011 Bachelors of Arts Degree in Psychology specialized in Criminal Justice GPA: 3.99 (President’s and Dean’s List) Platt College , Degree Completion: 2009 Associate of Arts Degree in Paralegal Studies GPA: 3.95 (Dean’s List) San Carlos State University of Guatemala, School of Law (2004 – 2007) Guatemala City, Guatemala Dean’s List SKILLS Bilingual : Fluent in English and Spanish (reading, writing and speaking). Computer Knowledge : Windows 1997, 2003, XP, Vista and Windows 7, MS Office (Word, Outlook, Excel, PowerPoint), Word Perfect, Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, basic web programming (HTML). Administrative: General Administration; Accounting, Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable, Types 60 Words Per Minute.
  6. 6. Reflection My experience at Argosy has been very different from any other study experiences I have had before. I interacted with my classmates and instructors through virtual settings and environments. I counted over 100 essays in my PC hard drive. This is something I had never done before. Being an online student has been one of the most intense experiences I have ever lived because I have been in front of the computer at least 70 hours per week because I work full time (40 hours per week) as a Paralegal while being a full time student at Argosy. I have learned that with online schooling you need to be proficient in time management and have strong self discipline. I carried my laptop with me almost 24/7. These are important because accumulated work can become very overwhelming. I also think it has been kind of weird not to interact with people face to face, but I am very into online social networks so I saw my experience at Argosy as another form of social networking. The advantage was that I was learning a lot and obtaining my degree at the same time. I would think twice before recommending this type of learning to any of my friends. Online schooling requires intense reading and writing, and some people might prefer lectures, taking notes and tests. I love to read and write so I did not have such a hard time. Overall, I feel that Argosy has helped me expand my critical thinking skills and I have acquired valuable tools for research and interpretation of concepts
  7. 7. Reflection Strengths Argosy has helped me analyze the complexities of a given issue however I still need. I am now to compare, contrast, and use information from a variety of sources pertinent to the chosen topic when completing a project in psychology. Thanks to Argosy I know how to correctly summarize the research design, statistical and other evaluative tools, and findings of the article. I have also developed the ability to apply clarity in content, language use, grammar, organization using APA formatting. This construction of ideas helps me develop, apply and defend a particular stance related to psychological concepts in written work. I can also recognize now the subtle breaches in ethical practices in psychology and I feel like I can make good choices of behaviors. I also can engage in multiculturally-sensitive thought and action, and I can recognize subtle forms of discrimination and prejudice within and around psychology. I think it helps a lot that I am from another culture and that I have many friends from different backgrounds. I embrace different culture. I am now able to synthesize and evaluate various psychological theories, and apply them to explain everyday events and experiences. I can also use psychological principles in solving problems, explaining social issues, and dealing with everyday life situations. Overall, I feel like the knowledge acquired has helped me understand many psychological concepts and I know feel confident when a certain psychological topic is touched or when a situation needs a certain explanation. I think my GPA will reflect how dedicated and head strong I was during my BA studies even though I has a lot of situations and circumstances going on in my life while I was studying.
  8. 8. Reflection Weaknesses <ul><li>I still struggle when it comes to actually finding the sources, but I think this is something that I can work on through practice.
  9. 9. I am not a big fan of experimental psychology so research studies and presentations can sometimes make me struggle. I was not a big fan of Psychological Statistics.
  10. 10. There are some ethical situations that I might not be familiar with because I have not been able to be active in the field. Knowing the theory is not enough unless you put it in practice.
  11. 11. I wish I would have had more time to volunteer while I was studying in order to get a feel of how psychological concepts can be applied to real life situations. My biggest weakness is my lack of familiarity with the practice of the field.
  12. 12. I know that further studies requires further research, and this is something I will still have to struggle with. However, it is something I need to work on due tot he use of research terminology used in the field. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Table of Contents Cognitive Abilities: Critical Thinking and Information Literacy Communication Skills: Oral and Written Ethics and Diversity Awareness Foundations of Psychology Applied Psychology Interpersonal Effectiveness
  14. 14. Critical Thinking How might your own cultural , ethnic , or family values , rules , or traditions be misinterpreted as “ abnormal ” by someone from a dissimilar background ? Give examples in your answer . Each socio - cultural group fosters its own cultural patterns by systematically teaching its offspring , all its members tend to be somewhat alike . In a society characterized by a limited and consistent point of view , there are not the wide individual differences that are typical in a society like ours , where children have contact with diverse , often conflicting beliefs . I feel that even in our society , however , there are certain core values that most of us consider essential . Many clinicians have cultural biases and stereptypes formed and that is why they see abnormal behaviors in their eyes . Abnormal behavior is behavior that deviates from the norms of the society in which the person lives . Experiences such as hearing the voice of a dead relative might be regarded as normative in one culture ( e . g ., in many Native American tribes ), yet abnormal in another cultural milieu ( Butcher , et al , 2010). Nonetheless , certain unconventional actions and behaviors are almost universally considered to be the product of mental disorder . Another example is if of how women from different cultures , for instance , face very different norms about what constitutes an ideal body weight -- and this influences the course of certain disorders . Supposedly , anorexia nervosa is to have biological underpinnings and , therefore , universal , but in less industrialized cultures , anorexia is rare ( Vedantam , 2005). Culture informs our decisions on what we consider normal . If we understand that our definition of pathological isn ' t pathological in other countries , we can make better decisions on when to treat , especially with medications ( Butcher , et al , 2010). There is strong evidence of cultural influences on abnormal behavior , and this area of research may yet answer many questions about the origins and courses of behavior problems , as well as their treatment ( Butcher , et al , 2010). References Butcher , J . N ., Mineka , S . & Hooley , J . M . (2010). Abnormal Psychology . Pearson Education , Inc . Boston : MA . Vedantam , S . (2005). Patients ' Diversity Is Often Discounted . The Washington Post . Retrieved March 12, 2011, from , http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/06/25/AR2005062500982.html
  15. 15. Critical Thinking Dealing with resistance is a big part of the treatment of involuntary clients. What are some methods of involving clients in their treatment to lessen resistance? Why do you think these would be successful? Sometimes, despite a counselor’s best efforts, some clients respond negatively to counseling interventions. The behaviors displayed by these difficult clients are referred to as resistance. In clinical terms, resistance is defined as “a process of avoiding or diminishing the self-disclosing communication requested by the interviewer because of its capacity to make the interviewee uncomfortable or anxious” (Watson, 2006). Client resistance is one of many clinical challenges counselors regularly face. To make things easier, counselors should understand that resistance is a normal client reaction. Its presence in session should be expected and not come as a surprise. Once counselors become familiar with resistance, they can begin to see it for its true therapeutic value. Client resistance usually signifies that a particularly distressing issue has been brought up with the client. This issue might be central to the work both counselor and client are trying to achieve (Watson, 2006).
  16. 16. Critical Thinking ( CONTINUATION OF RESISTANCE DISCUSSION) It is important for counselors to recognize client's feelings and thoughts. Unsure of what to expect, clients are asked to enter into a relationship built on trust and intimacy with an individual they have just met for the first time. Also, they have to explore personal issues they might not have shared previously with even their closest friends and family. This makes opening up to the counselor very hard. For involuntary clients, they have been coerced into treatment, and as a result they are not willing to fully commit themselves to the process, and given these situtions it is only natural that some clients feel a sense of resistance toward the counseling process (Watson, 2006). I also think it would help if counselors knew why clients are resistant, because it could be that each client is resistant due to different reasons. An understanding of how resistance is seen in different situations may help the counselor better understand the reasons behind a client’s difficult attitude during the counseling process (Watson, 2006). For example, some see and use resistance as a defense mechanism because it is the client’s attempt to block or repress anxiety-provoking memories and insights from entering conscious awareness. My therapist told me I used to resist because of this at the beginning of therapy.
  17. 17. Critical Thinking ( CONTINUATION OF RESISTANCE DISCUSSION) Another reason a client exhibits resistant behaviors might be because he/she (a) lacks the necessary skills or knowledge needed to follow behavioral assignments, (b) have negative expectations or beliefs regarding their counseling outcomes, and (c) are subject to undesirable environmental conditions (Watson, 2006). Ultimately, the client’s resistance is seen as an obstruction or obstacle to successful goal attainment. Rather than avoiding the issue, researchers suggest that client resistance should be addressed. Counselors need to employ a variety of strategies to productively use the client’s resistance to move therapy forward (Watson, 2006). References Argosy University.(2011). Module 5: group intervention. Retrieved June 8, 2011 from http://myeclassonline.com Mitchell, C.W. (2011). Effective techniques for dealing with highly resistant clients . Retrieved June 8, 2011 from https://learn4health.com/online-courses/effective-techniques-for-dealing-with-highly-resistant-clients-part-one Watson, J. C. (2006). Addressing client resistance: recognizing and processing in-session occurrences . Mississippi State: University Meridian Campus. Retrieved June 8, 2011 fromhttp://counselingoutfitters.com/Watson.htm
  18. 18. Critical Thinking How might your own cultural , ethnic , or family values , rules , or traditions be misinterpreted as “ abnormal ” by someone from a dissimilar background ? Give examples in your answer . Each socio - cultural group fosters its own cultural patterns by systematically teaching its offspring , all its members tend to be somewhat alike . In a society characterized by a limited and consistent point of view , there are not the wide individual differences that are typical in a society like ours , where children have contact with diverse , often conflicting beliefs . I feel that even in our society , however , there are certain core values that most of us consider essential . Many clinicians have cultural biases and stereptypes formed and that is why they see abnormal behaviors in their eyes . Abnormal behavior is behavior that deviates from the norms of the society in which the person lives . Experiences such as hearing the voice of a dead relative might be regarded as normative in one culture ( e . g ., in many Native American tribes ), yet abnormal in another cultural milieu ( Butcher , et al , 2010). Nonetheless , certain unconventional actions and behaviors are almost universally considered to be the product of mental disorder . Another example is if of how women from different cultures , for instance , face very different norms about what constitutes an ideal body weight -- and this influences the course of certain disorders . Supposedly , anorexia nervosa is to have biological underpinnings and , therefore , universal , but in less industrialized cultures , anorexia is rare ( Vedantam , 2005). Culture informs our decisions on what we consider normal . If we understand that our definition of pathological isn ' t pathological in other countries , we can make better decisions on when to treat , especially with medications ( Butcher , et al , 2010). There is strong evidence of cultural influences on abnormal behavior , and this area of research may yet answer many questions about the origins and courses of behavior problems , as well as their treatment ( Butcher , et al , 2010). References Butcher , J . N ., Mineka , S . & Hooley , J . M . (2010). Abnormal Psychology . Pearson Education , Inc . Boston : MA . Vedantam , S . (2005). Patients ' Diversity Is Often Discounted . The Washington Post . Retrieved March 12, 2011, from , http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/06/25/AR2005062500982.html
  19. 19. Ethics and Diversity Awareness Why is culture an important consideration in the interview , assessment , and diagnostic process ? I feel that culture is very important to keep in mind because certain forms of psychopathology appear to be highly specific to certain cultures . It is like they are found only in certain areas of the world , and seem to be highly linked to culturally bound concerns ( Butcher , et al , 2010). I think that therapist and clinicians need to be aware of how people ’ s cultural , ethnic , socioeconomic , and family backgrounds can shape their views of personal problems and the world in order to address the mental disorder and counseling methods . Acknowledging the importance of cultural factors in diagnosing patients can help the therapist to address the disorders in a more efficient manner . If the clinician attends an individual ’ s cultural identity it can lead to possible cultural explanations for an individual ’ s disorder , and even to cultural factors that might affect that clinician ’ s relationship with the individual . It is good for the therapist in the interview , assessment and diagnostic process to do some research , and to find out about the culture - bound syndromes that usually occur only in specific societies or cultural areas . I think that c ulture and the environment play a huge role in why people develop emotional problems , what treatments they respond to and whether they recover .  
  20. 20. Ethics and Diversity Awareness How might your own cultural , ethnic , or family values , rules , or traditions be misinterpreted as “ abnormal ” by someone from a dissimilar background ? Give examples in your answer . Each socio - cultural group fosters its own cultural patterns by systematically teaching its offspring , all its members tend to be somewhat alike . In a society characterized by a limited and consistent point of view , there are not the wide individual differences that are typical in a society like ours , where children have contact with diverse , often conflicting beliefs . I feel that even in our society , however , there are certain core values that most of us consider essential . I feel that many clinicians have cultural biases and stereptypes formed and that is why they see abnormal behaviors in their eyes . Abnormal behavior is behavior that deviates from the norms of the society in which the person lives . W omen from different cultures , for instance , face very different norms about what constitutes an ideal body weight -- and this influences the course of certain disorders . Supposedly , anorexia nervosa is to have biological underpinnings and , therefore , universal , but in less industrialized cultures , anorexia is rare ( Vedantam , 2005). Culture informs our decisions on what we consider normal . If we understand that our definition of pathological isn ' t pathological in other countries , we can make better decisions on when to treat , especially with medications ( Butcher , et al , 2010). References Butcher, J.N., Mineka, S. & Hooley, J.M. (2010). Abnormal Psychology. Pearson Education, Inc. Boston: MA. Vedantam, S. (2005). Patients' Diversity Is Often Discounted . The Washington Post. Retrieved March 12, 2011, from, http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/06/25/AR2005062500982.html
  21. 21. Ethics and Diversity Awareness INTERVENTION AND ETHICS There are many ethical concerns to take into account with interventions . One concern surrounding interventions is informed consent , which refers to a patient agreeing to or consenting to intervention and subsequent treatment ( Argosy University , 2010). Ethically , healthcare professionals are bound to respect participants ’ addiction treatment - seeking decisions , and therefore cannot force treatment onto unwilling participants unless they represent a threat to themselves or others ( Lim , 2010). Professional ethics and legal precedents suggest that informed consent is the beginning of an intervention ( Argosy University , 2010). Sometimes coercive tactics are characteristic of interventions ( Lim , 2010) and this in itself is ethical because nobody , not even an addict , should be forced to do something they do not wish to do , unless their life is really in severe danger . The couple ’ s initial response to confrontation is to leave the intervention and escape . Eventually they might submit to social pressure and undergoes treatment . This separation between personal motivation and rehabilitation entry is an ethical issue to consider ( Lim , 2010). Several studies have suggested the importance of the association between internal desire to reduce or change addictive behavior and long - term recovery ( Lim , 2010).
  22. 22. Ethics and Diversity Awareness Another ethical concern is privacy . Professionals should exercise caution when sharing information , particularly with the patient ’ s place of employment or in community settings , where the patient ’ s confidentiality may be breached ( Argosy University , 2010). Professionals involved in a potential patient ’ s intervention should also not directly benefit from the intervention or proposed treatment program . For example , the director of an expensive residential treatment program should not be placed in the position of directing the intervention ( Argosy University , 2010). References Argosy University . (2010). Module 7: various treatment strategies . Retrieved August 14, 2010, from , http :// myeclassonline . com / re / DotNextLaunch . asp ? courseid Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers . (2010). Addiction intervention . Retrieved August 14, 2010, from , http :// www . treatment - centers . net / addiction - intervention . html Lim , A . (2010). The force of intervention . Retrieved August 14, 2010, from , http :// www . basisonline . org / Narcanon of Southern California . (2010). Drug intervention . Retrieved August 14, 2010, from , http :// www . addictionca . com / drug - intervention . htm
  23. 23. Foundations of Psychology Addiction intervention is a pre - planned attempt by one or many people such as family , friends , co - workers , or even neighbors to get the addict to seek professional  addiction treatment , and to enter a rehabilitation treatment center .   Often interventions are held by family members and close friends and take place when other approaches to have the addict getting help have been unsuccessful ( Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers , 2010). It would be best for the interventionist to get all the facts about the addiction the couple is bound to before talking to them . The intervention needs to be done at the right time and place , preferably when the addict is sober and in a calming , private place ( Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers , 2010). An effective intervention should be well planned and should include as many caring , invested individuals from a substance abuser ’ s personal and professional life as possible ( Argosy University , 2010). In this case it would be very good to alert the couple ’ s family and friends so they can provide as much support as possible .
  24. 24. Foundations of Psychology The interventionist needs to plan what he or she is going to say & mentally prepare for the intervention ( Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers , 2010) because their most likely will be great opposition from the couple . He or she needs to convey affection and respect to the couple in order to not make them feel less because they have their addiction . The interventionist needs to express concern . Successful interventions , which are presented in the spirit of love , care and concern , many times are referred to as “ carefrontation versus confrontation ” ( Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers , 2010). Therapists should , however , take care to not embarrass or humiliate the substance abusers . The primary objective is to provide a caring and supporting environment where loved ones provide clear evidence of how the substance abusers ’ substance use is hurting them and those around them . As stated earlier , the goal of an intervention is twofold : challenge a substance abuser ’ s system of denial , and immediately secure treatment . References Argosy University. (2010). Module 7: various treatment strategies . Retrieved August 14, 2010, from, http://myeclassonline.com/re/DotNextLaunch.asp?courseid Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers. (2010). Addiction intervention. Retrieved August 14, 2010, from, http://www.treatment-centers.net/addiction-intervention.html
  25. 25. Applied Psychology Do you believe in &quot;repressed memory or not? I do believe in repressed memory. A person subjected to a traumatic event can use a variety of psychological mechanisms to cope with the trauma . In some instances , particularly if the event occurs at an early age , these coping mechanisms could result in an individual not remembering ( repressing ) that the event ever occurred ( Blommer , 2007). I have had repressed memories myself and I know they have not been made up or placed in my mind by someone else like the controversy holds, because I have been able to confirm these memories with third parties. I also believe that repression is a strong defense mechanism where one pushes painful or dangerous thoughts out of consciousness , keeping them unconscious ( Maisto , 2008). Repression is considered to be the most basic of the defense mechanisms ( Maisto , 2008). Defense mechanism from what ? From anxiety , emotional pain , and / or emotional instability . Sometimes the repression does not last forever , though , and that memory that one is trying to forget or make disappear can make its way to our mental surface and cause the person to remember and relive . I agree with m any psychologists that believe that individuals can recover some past memories , but the memories cannot be recovered in their pristine form ( Argosy University , 2010). It is also true that during the process of reconstruction , the memories can get distorted ( Argosy University , 2010). But I believe the base form of the memory is the important part . Some people believe that little details are not so much of a deal when it comes to reliving a traumatic event . It is believed that he main event in the memory is really all what should matter ( Maisto , 2008). Yet , if there is a way that these memories can be confirmed or made valid , I do believe they should be given initial consideration . I believe that nowadays there are ways to prove the validity of such memories . If the offender or creator of such memories is alive this person can be put under a lying detection machine to corroborate if these memories are true .
  26. 26. Applied Psychology What are the controversies that surround this issue? The main controversy that stems from this phenomenon is that some people might recover memories of something that never really happened. The most common story of memory repression most people come across is related to childhood abuse, specifically sexual abuse. The whole incident is set in motion with a grown woman or man who enters into therapy because he or she is experiencing an eating disorder, depression or relationship difficulties. The therapist usually asks the patient early in therapy if he or she has ever been sexually abused and the patient answers no. The therapist however tells the patient that her problems indicate severe childhood trauma and that the woman cannot improve until she remembers the childhood trauma (Applebaum, et. al., 1997). The man or woman then starts to think more about abuse. The man/woman starts reading about sexual abuse. Finally, he or she recovers a memory of sexual abuse. The problem is that we do not know if the man or woman is recovering memories of sexual abuse that actually happened or he or she might be creating the memories in response to therapy (Applebaum, et. al., 1997). Opponents of the therapy advance the hypothesis that repressive therapy can create false memories through suggestion techniques (Applebaum, et.al., 1997). An individual's ability to accurately recall traumatic memories after long periods of time has been debated because it is hard to establish whether an individual can recall information without distortion (Argosy University, 2010). The time gap between when a person remembers as to when the incident happened makes the repressed memory less credible or makes it less reliable to believe in. Another issue that causes controversy is that there are too few actual trials from which to gather data about reactions to repressed memory claims (Loftus, 1993). However, actual court cases and juror simulations indicate that jurors find the repressed memory claims potentially highly credible (Applebaum, 1997).
  27. 27. Applied Psychology References (Repressed Memory) Applebaum , P ., Uyehara , L ., & Elin , M . (1997)   Trauma and memory : clinical and legal controversies . Oxford University Press . Retrieved June 1, 2010 from http :// site . ebrary . com . libproxy . edmc . edu / lib / argosy / docDetail . action ? docID =10087294& p 00= memory %20%20 truama Argosy University. (2010). Module 4: Jury Selection. Retrieved June 1, 2010, from http://myeclassonline.com/re/DotNextLaunch.asp?courseid=4131509 Blommer, S. (2007). What you should know about repressed and recovered memories. American Psychological Association. Retrieved June 1, 2010, from http://ehis.ebscohost.com.libproxy.edmc.edu
  28. 28. My Future in Learning Learning is something that never ends. We learn something new everyday even if we do not think so. If we have a job, we can learn things at our job. We also learn from other people on a daily basis as well. I have been in college for quite a well. I went to Law School in another country; I went to Paralegal school and now I have completed my BA program. I feel as though I have been studying forever, so I am used to being in a constant learning mode. I do wish to continue expanding my knowledge, but in the future I will study about specific things I enjoy. This fall I will enroll myself at my local college to study Korean and Japanese. I enjoy learning new things. I was able to endure the whole BA experience because I am very passionate about Psychology and about helping others, so I knew it would be worth it at the end. I want to pursue my Masters to specialize in the field that interests me and I want to continue learning languages. I am not afraid of the learning experience. I embrace it because knowing is half the battle. One you have the knowledge, you can go out to the world and use what you have learned.
  29. 29. Contact Me Thank you for viewing my ePortfolio. For further information, please contact me at the e-mail address below. [email_address]

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