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Health Marketing:  What It Is and What It Isn’t Michael Stellefson Doctoral Student Department of Health and Kinesiology T...
Business Mindsets <ul><li>Product Mindset -  a wealth of products are offered due to the very high demand for those produc...
Traditional Marketing Defined <ul><li>Marketing - satisfying producer and consumer wants and needs through  exchange  proc...
Marketing and Exchange Cancer Screening -> Travel time to doctors Health New Car -> Money Traditional Benefit Is exchanged...
Marketing Principles <ul><li>Achieving the “sale” is the desired outcome </li></ul><ul><li>A market not only has a need, b...
 
Organization Centered “Marketing” <ul><li>The organizations offering is seen as inherently desirable. </li></ul><ul><li>La...
Consumer Centered Marketing <ul><li>Focuses on behavior as the “bottom line” of much of what it does. </li></ul><ul><li>Re...
Selling vs. Marketing <ul><li>Selling  – concentrating on producer’s needs </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing  – concentrates on ...
 
Advertising <ul><li>Advertising-  to make known or to give notice about a product, service or program </li></ul><ul><ul><l...
Non-Profit Marketing <ul><li>Includes marketing activities conducted by individuals and organizations to achieve some soci...
Social Marketing <ul><li>Adaptation of commercial marketing technologies to programs designed to influence the voluntary b...
Health Marketing <ul><li>Involves creating, communicating, and delivering health information & interventions using custome...
Health Marketing and Exchange Favorable Read health info online -> Time Kids Not favorable Read health info in paper -> Ti...
Health Marketing vs.  Health Communication <ul><li>Too many confuse health marketing with health communication.  </li></ul...
Marketing has a Behavioral Bottom Line <ul><li>Those without a “behavioral bottom line” are more inclined to evaluate prog...
 
Next time… <ul><li>Integrating marketing activities and consumer behavior theory into marketing agendas </li></ul>
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Health Marketing What It Is And What It Isn

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Transcript of "Health Marketing What It Is And What It Isn"

  1. 1. Health Marketing: What It Is and What It Isn’t Michael Stellefson Doctoral Student Department of Health and Kinesiology Texas A&M University
  2. 2. Business Mindsets <ul><li>Product Mindset - a wealth of products are offered due to the very high demand for those products. </li></ul><ul><li>Sales Mindset - supply outgrows demand, so you have to begin “selling” your products through persuasion and advertising. </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing Mindset - instead of just producing products and then trying to “sell” them to consumers, first determine what customers want before even producing the product. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Traditional Marketing Defined <ul><li>Marketing - satisfying producer and consumer wants and needs through exchange processes (Kotler, 1979) </li></ul><ul><li>The bottom line of all private sector marketing is the production of sales </li></ul><ul><li>To achieve sales objectives, private sector marketers engage in activities that are designed to change beliefs, attitudes, and values </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Their reasoning for doing this is that they expect such changes to lead to increased sales </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Marketing and Exchange Cancer Screening -> Travel time to doctors Health New Car -> Money Traditional Benefit Is exchanged for… Price Type of Marketing
  5. 5. Marketing Principles <ul><li>Achieving the “sale” is the desired outcome </li></ul><ul><li>A market not only has a need, but also has the ability, willingness, and authority to address the need. </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing involves developing and managing a product that will satisfy target market needs </li></ul>
  6. 7. Organization Centered “Marketing” <ul><li>The organizations offering is seen as inherently desirable. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of organizational success is attributed to customer ignorance, absence of motivation, or both </li></ul><ul><li>A minor role is afforded to customer research </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing is defined primarily as promotion </li></ul><ul><li>One ‘best’ marketing strategy is typically employed in approaching the entire market </li></ul><ul><li>Competition from competing forces tends to be ignored </li></ul>
  7. 8. Consumer Centered Marketing <ul><li>Focuses on behavior as the “bottom line” of much of what it does. </li></ul><ul><li>Rely heavily on research. </li></ul><ul><li>Has a bias toward segmentation. </li></ul><ul><li>Defines competition broadly. </li></ul><ul><li>Uses strategies using all elements of the “marketing mix” not just “communication” </li></ul>
  8. 9. Selling vs. Marketing <ul><li>Selling – concentrating on producer’s needs </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing – concentrates on the needs of the public </li></ul>
  9. 11. Advertising <ul><li>Advertising- to make known or to give notice about a product, service or program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To tell about or praise publicly as through newspaper, flyers, radio, TV, etc., so as to make people want to buy something </li></ul></ul><ul><li>DO NOT EQUATE MARKETING WITH ADVERTISING </li></ul><ul><li>Those who equate marketing with advertising believe that the goal of marketing is to get the word out about behavior change or change attitudes about particular behaviors without determining whether each of these “objectives” will lead to the desired behavior change (goal) </li></ul>
  10. 12. Non-Profit Marketing <ul><li>Includes marketing activities conducted by individuals and organizations to achieve some social goal other than ordinary business goals of profit, market share, or return on investment. </li></ul>
  11. 13. Social Marketing <ul><li>Adaptation of commercial marketing technologies to programs designed to influence the voluntary behavior of priority audiences to improve their personal welfare and that of the society of which they are a part </li></ul>
  12. 14. Health Marketing <ul><li>Involves creating, communicating, and delivering health information & interventions using customer-centered and science-based strategies to deliver health interventions (CDC, 2005) </li></ul><ul><li>Draws from marketing, communication and health promotion </li></ul><ul><li>National Center for Health Marketing (CDC) http:// www.cdc.gov/healthmarketing / </li></ul>
  13. 15. Health Marketing and Exchange Favorable Read health info online -> Time Kids Not favorable Read health info in paper -> Time Kids Not favorable Read health info online -> Time Elderly Favorable Read health info in paper -> Time Elderly Outcome Value Item #2 Item #1 Target Market
  14. 16. Health Marketing vs. Health Communication <ul><li>Too many confuse health marketing with health communication. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>While marketers communicate information, marketing is not simply education dissemination. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Many health communication programs are largely educational </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In taking a marketing perspective, education is only useful if it leads to the desired behavior change (Andreasen, 1995). </li></ul></ul>
  15. 17. Marketing has a Behavioral Bottom Line <ul><li>Those without a “behavioral bottom line” are more inclined to evaluate program success in non-behavioral terms such as the number of messages distributed, beliefs changed, or sessions held (Process evaluation measures) </li></ul><ul><li>Health communication tends to measure success by what can be measured, rather than tackle the harder problem of figuring out what should be measured and then attempting to do so (Andreasen, 1995) </li></ul>
  16. 19. Next time… <ul><li>Integrating marketing activities and consumer behavior theory into marketing agendas </li></ul>
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