MORE PBL, MORE FEATURES<br />Teachers who use PBL to a greater extent use more online features<br />Mean # of<br />Feature...
Assessing the impact of <br />ONLINE SUPPORTS ON PBL use <br />in US High Schools<br />Jason Ravitz        Julie Blazevski...
Why study PBL?<br />Strong theoretical basis<br />Evidence of effectiveness<br />Emphasized in small high school reform<br...
"It appears that small schools are fostering more personal and supportive contexts for both teachers and students, but the...
“Among the schools in this initiative that reported efforts to implement a common pedagogy across all classes, Project Bas...
Institute of Education Sciences – Newsflash (August, 2010)<br />Problem-based curriculum boosts high school students' know...
A design view of PBL<br />“a systematic teaching method that engages students in learning essential knowledge and life-enh...
Today’s PBL<br />Looks nothing like the ‘Project Method” popularized by William H. Kilpatrick (1918), in the early 20th ce...
But….it’s not easy<br />Teachers need<br />Professional development<br />Resources<br />Structural change (time)<br />Asse...
SURVEY POPULATION1200 PBL using teachers400 valid responses35% response<br />
SURVEY POPULATION<br /><ul><li>Academic teachers in public US High Schools
Large, comprehensive schools
Small High Schools (Start-ups and Conversions)
Reform Models
Invested in PBL
Received BIE Materials or Workshops
Confirmed use of PBL for “core” academics
Math, Science, Social Studies or English</li></li></ul><li>Partner Organizations<br /><ul><li>New Technology High schools
High Tech High schools
Edvision Schools
Envision Schools
North Carolina New Schools Project
Center for Effective School Practices (NJ/OH)
San Diego City “Renewal” Schools</li></li></ul><li>
Research Questions<br />In different kinds of high schools and across academic subjects…<br /><ul><li>  What is the preval...
  To what extent is online feature use related to PBL use,</li></ul>    preparedness and challenges?<br />
PBL INVOLVES:<br /><ul><li>Extended investigation
In-depth inquiry
Student self-direction or choice
Presentation of results or conclusions   </li></li></ul><li>ONLINE FEATURES<br /><ul><li>Resource Lists
  Project Libraries
  Design & Management Tools
  Collaboration Tools
  Student Feedback
  Teacher Feedback
  Access to Experts</li></li></ul><li>PREVALENCE<br />
PBL Use and Conditions by School Type<br />PBL & High School Reform<br />%<br />
PBL Challenges by School Type<br />% of teachers “moderate” or “major” challenge<br />
When compared to other schools,<br />2X<br />more Large School Teachers were<br />Challenged by lack ofProfessional Develo...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Online Supports for PBL Use

2,137
-1

Published on

Online features support PBL use among high school teachers in various reform settings.

Presented at Annual Meetings of the Association of Educational Communications and Technology (AECT). Anaheim, CA. October, 2010.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,137
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • PBE was effectiveboth deeper learning and standardized tests. Teachers liked it better. Students had a chance to practice 21cs.
  • Our definition is consistent with “inquiry” pr “problem-based” (e.g., Barron study in references)Teachers were instructed to substitute their preferred term (only 17% did)Gates study just uses “PBL” for project- or problem-basedWhy do we care about PBL? It’s “proven” in professional education (see Strobel &amp; van Barnfeld reference)2) There is growing evidence in K-12 (see Does PBL Work? Reference, forthcoming PBE study from WestEd/IES)3) There is growing interest in high schools e.g. large scale implementation in West Virginia (1300 teachers so far)4) PBL is tied to other reforms (e.g., Ravitz, 2009; 2008) 21st Century Skills, teacher climate, student culture, inquiry practices, performance assessment, multi-disciplinary teaching, team teaching, etc.5) Constructivist-oriented (PBL-related) teaching is consistently correlated to Internet use in K-12 (e.g., Becker &amp; Riel, 2008)
  • Listed from most prevalent to least prevalentWe asked for different levels of awareness and use, but any use vs. none consistently had the most predictive validity.
  • Online Features can inform teachers about PBL and provide resources to make PBL easier or better.PBL, in turn, can encourage use of technology (e.g., for collecting and analyzing data) There seems to be a mutually reinforcing relationship, but on the other hand, maybe a third variable (early adopter, teacher leader) predicts both, making the relationship “spurious”. This might be consistent with viewing PBL as a technology itself – a particularly complex one that can be quite “low tech” with regards to other technologies, but usually is not.See Riel &amp; Becker, 2008 re: “teacher leaders” are more constructivist-oriented and use more technologyWhat makes people turn to technology – lack of resources for PD/collaboration (e.g., in large schools), or extensive resources/capacity for learning new things?
  • For examples of research across the PBL spectrum see the BIE web site. Click on “Research” for multiple studies from within BIE and other sources – Apple, University of Michigan, etc.Please let us know if there are other studies or resources we should be highlighting
  • Stay in touch!!If you register for the BIE site you can discuss this session bie.org-&gt; Need to Know Forum- &gt; Research -&gt; What is the relationship between technology use &amp; PBL?Or just paste in this URL -- http://www.bie.org/forums/viewthread/6/
  • Online Supports for PBL Use

    1. 1. MORE PBL, MORE FEATURES<br />Teachers who use PBL to a greater extent use more online features<br />Mean # of<br />Features Used<br />Amount of time spent on PBL, in selected course<br />
    2. 2. Assessing the impact of <br />ONLINE SUPPORTS ON PBL use <br />in US High Schools<br />Jason Ravitz Julie Blazevski<br />Buck Institute for Education Hypothesi<br />Novato, CA Ann Arbor, MI<br />jason@bie.orgjulie@bie.org<br />
    3. 3.
    4. 4. Why study PBL?<br />Strong theoretical basis<br />Evidence of effectiveness<br />Emphasized in small high school reform<br />PBL is the most frequently cited strategy<br />Biggest hurdles are instructional<br />Need for more sophisticated PBL in K-12<br />Need for supports for PBL<br />Or else PBL will not be used, or used effectively<br />
    5. 5. "It appears that small schools are fostering more personal and supportive contexts for both teachers and students, but they do not appear to be spurring increased instructional reform”<br />- Kahne, Sporte, de la Torre & Easton (2006)<br />
    6. 6. “Among the schools in this initiative that reported efforts to implement a common pedagogy across all classes, Project Based Learning (PBL) is the most commonly cited instructional strategy”<br />– GATES Funded Evaluation (AIR/SRI)<br />
    7. 7. Institute of Education Sciences – Newsflash (August, 2010)<br />Problem-based curriculum boosts high school students' knowledge of economics <br />http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?ProjectID=89<br />
    8. 8.
    9. 9. A design view of PBL<br />“a systematic teaching method that engages students in learning essential knowledge and life-enhancing skills through an extended, student-influenced inquiry process that is structured around complex, authentic questions and carefully designedproducts and tasks”<br />Mergendoller, et al., 2006 <br />
    10. 10. Today’s PBL<br />Looks nothing like the ‘Project Method” popularized by William H. Kilpatrick (1918), in the early 20th century <br />Nor does it look like “discovery learning” or “minimally-guided instruction”, popularized later 20th century<br /> High Tech High School (hightechhigh.org/projects/)<br /> Envision Schools (envisionprojects.org)<br /> Expeditionary Learning schools (elschools.org)<br /> New Tech Network (newtechnetwork.org)<br />
    11. 11. But….it’s not easy<br />Teachers need<br />Professional development<br />Resources<br />Structural change (time)<br />Assessment reform<br />Do they need online technologies too?<br />
    12. 12. SURVEY POPULATION1200 PBL using teachers400 valid responses35% response<br />
    13. 13. SURVEY POPULATION<br /><ul><li>Academic teachers in public US High Schools
    14. 14. Large, comprehensive schools
    15. 15. Small High Schools (Start-ups and Conversions)
    16. 16. Reform Models
    17. 17. Invested in PBL
    18. 18. Received BIE Materials or Workshops
    19. 19. Confirmed use of PBL for “core” academics
    20. 20. Math, Science, Social Studies or English</li></li></ul><li>Partner Organizations<br /><ul><li>New Technology High schools
    21. 21. High Tech High schools
    22. 22. Edvision Schools
    23. 23. Envision Schools
    24. 24. North Carolina New Schools Project
    25. 25. Center for Effective School Practices (NJ/OH)
    26. 26. San Diego City “Renewal” Schools</li></li></ul><li>
    27. 27. Research Questions<br />In different kinds of high schools and across academic subjects…<br /><ul><li> What is the prevalence of PBL use, preparedness and</li></ul> challenges?<br /><ul><li> What is the prevalence of online feature use for PBL?
    28. 28. To what extent is online feature use related to PBL use,</li></ul> preparedness and challenges?<br />
    29. 29. PBL INVOLVES:<br /><ul><li>Extended investigation
    30. 30. In-depth inquiry
    31. 31. Student self-direction or choice
    32. 32. Presentation of results or conclusions </li></li></ul><li>ONLINE FEATURES<br /><ul><li>Resource Lists
    33. 33. Project Libraries
    34. 34. Design & Management Tools
    35. 35. Collaboration Tools
    36. 36. Student Feedback
    37. 37. Teacher Feedback
    38. 38. Access to Experts</li></li></ul><li>PREVALENCE<br />
    39. 39. PBL Use and Conditions by School Type<br />PBL & High School Reform<br />%<br />
    40. 40. PBL Challenges by School Type<br />% of teachers “moderate” or “major” challenge<br />
    41. 41. When compared to other schools,<br />2X<br />more Large School Teachers were<br />Challenged by lack ofProfessional Development<br />2X<br />fewer Reform Model Teachers were<br />Challengedby lack of Time in Curriculumfor PBL<br />
    42. 42.
    43. 43. When compared to other schools,<br />2-3X<br />fewer Large School Teachers<br />ReceivedOnline Feedback about projects<br />3X<br />more Reform Model Teachers<br />have had Studentsget Online Feedback<br />
    44. 44. RELATIONSHIPS<br />
    45. 45. MORE PBL, MORE FEATURES<br />Teachers who use PBL to a greater extent use more online features<br />Mean # of<br />Features Used<br />Amount of time spent on PBL, in selected course<br />
    46. 46. Online Features Correlated to PBL Preparedness<br />-0.05<br />-0.10<br />Correlations<br />
    47. 47. Correlation Between PBL Use & Features Use<br />0.60 Math<br />0.57 Social Studies<br />0.40 Interdisciplinary<br />0.36 Science<br />0.19 English<br />
    48. 48. When compared to other teachers,<br />2x<br />fewer Large School Teachers<br />who used online collections of projects<br />were challenged by lack of PBL examples or models<br />3x<br />fewer Large School Teachers<br />who used online collections of PBL resources<br />were challenged by lack of Professional Development<br />
    49. 49. Preparedness for Tasks by Use of Features<br />Comparisons of the % of those whoused the feature who felt “well prepared” <br />followed by the % of those who did not use the feature who felt “well prepared” , within school type (R=Reform Network, S=Small School, L=Larger, comprehensive)<br />
    50. 50.
    51. 51. When compared to other teachers,<br />50%<br />more Small School Teachers<br />who design & manage projects online<br />feel well prepared for each PBL-related Task<br />50%<br />more Reform Model Teachers<br />who link to experts online<br />feel well prepared for most PBL-related Tasks<br />
    52. 52. When compared to other teachers,<br />100%<br />of Large School Teachers<br />who received online feedback from others<br />Felt Well Prepared to…<br /><ul><li>Teach as assess skills beyond academics
    53. 53. Facilitate and manage groups
    54. 54. Promote depth of student work
    55. 55. Meet state standards
    56. 56. Plan and design new standards</li></ul>vs. about 50%<br />who did not receive online feedback<br />
    57. 57. In Reform Model Schools<br />Online Feature Use is related to…<br />β=<br /> 0.20 Preparedness<br />-0.21 FewerChallenges<br /> 0.25 Time Spent on PBL<br />After controlling for teacher professional engagement, <br />school wide emphasis on PBL, and interdisciplinary instruction<br />
    58. 58. In non-reform Model Schools<br />Online Feature Use is related to…<br />β=<br /> 0.38 Preparedness<br />-0.20 FewerChallenges<br />After controlling for teacher professional engagement, <br />school wide emphasis on PBL, and interdisciplinary instruction<br />
    59. 59. Which came first PBL or Technology?<br />PBL is a technology<br />Innovativeness<br /> = one construct?<br />Does that make the<br />entire relationship <br />spurious?<br />Do you have to be an early adopter or teacher-leader?<br />
    60. 60. “Technology is the answer<br /> …but what was the question?” (Ely, 1991)<br /> A. Can we support more effective use of PBL? <br /> (by using new technologies) <br /> B. Can we support more effective use of new technologies? <br />(by using PBL)<br />Don’t drop the egg! (Solis, 2010) <br />
    61. 61. Future Research<br />How does PBL use differ when new technologies are used?<br />How does new technology use differ when PBL is used? <br />
    62. 62. REFERENCES<br />Barron, B. & Darling-Hammond, L. (2008).  Powerful Learning: What We Know About Teaching for Understanding. http://www.bie.org/research/study/powerful_learning<br />Buck Institute for Education (2010). Does PBL Work? http://www.bie.org/about/does_pbl_work<br />Mitchell, K., Shkolnik, J.,Song, M, Uekawa, K., Murphy, R., Garet, M., & Means, B. (2005).  Rigor, relevance, and results: The quality of teacher assignments and student work in new and conventional high schools.  Washington, D.C.: American Institutes for Research and SRI International.   http://smallhs.sri.com/documents/Rigor_Rpt_10_21_2005.pdf. <br />Ravitz, J. (2009a). Does Project Based Learning Help Foster Communities of Learners in Small US High Schools? Paper presented at meetings of of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction. Amsterdam, NL. August 29, 2009. http://www.bie.org/research/study/BIE_EARLI_2009<br />Ravitz, J. (2008). Project Based Learning as a Catalyst in Reforming High Schools. Paper presented at Annual Meetings of the American Educational Research Association. NY, NY: http://www.bie.org/research/study/AERA_2008<br />Riel, M. & Becker, H. (2008). Characteristics of teacher leaders for information and communication technology. In J. Voogt & G. Knezek (eds.) International Handbook of Information Technology in Primary and Secondary Education, 397-417. http://mindmaps.typepad.com/files/08-riel-becker-teacher-leadership-tech.pdf<br />Strobel, Johannes and van Barneveld, Angela (2008) "When is PBL More Effective? A Meta-synthesis of Meta-analyses Comparing PBL to Conventional Classrooms," Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-based Learning , 3(4). :http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/ijpbl/vol3/iss1/4<br />
    63. 63.
    64. 64. bie.org/research<br />biepbl.blogspot.com<br />
    65. 65. jason@bie.org<br />twitter.com/biepbl<br />twitter.com/jasonbie<br />youtube.com/biepbl<br />
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×