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IntelliDrive Mobility Workshop - TriMet

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  • TriMet’s Open Data story began in the mid-90s, with the installation of a computer and GPS units on our buses for AVL and Dispatch purposes. Those purposes quickly expanded with demand. The airport needed next arrival information for incoming travelers, Our on-street signs needed next arrival time, Our automated call system needed next arrival time…
  • What we had was a menu and lots of customers wanting to order, but we needed a server. A Server, or a Web Service, can basically take orders and personally deliver them exactly as ordered.  Personal service at any table anywhere.  So we expanded with the demand and, ultimately, became a restaurant that was known for its great services, and its java. 
  • In 2005, when after traveling abroad, I decided it should be just as easy to plan transit trips as it is to get driving directions from anywhere in the world.  I reached out to Yahoo, MapQuest and Google, and eventually, Google responded.  In 6 months, the first release of Google Transit was released in Portland, Oregon. 
  • Now it is worldwide in more than 448 cities and growing.
  • What made this possible, I believe, were two important ingredients:  a tremendously useful tool that the public wanted, and a common data format, the GTFS, that was simple enough for anyone to work with and understand. It doesn’t meet all needs, and its not intended to, but it does serve a specific purpose very well and its evolving. Its important to understand that standards are a verb, not a noun. Several agencies worked with Google to create the first draft of the GTFS data format, and now it is maintained by users worldwide and it has expanded to meet the needs of hundreds of applications, not just Google. 
  • We created a page for developer resources so they could easily access the GTFS static schedule data and our next arrival information by exposing our web services. The results?  Lots of satisfied customers.  We are nearing 40 applications all developed by third parties.
  • You don’t need to be a lawyer to understand our license agreement for the static data. It basically provides protection and defines terms of use.
  • We make it as easy as possible to developers to access and understand our data quickly.
  • At first we listed close to 10 different criteria for being included and publicized in our App Center. We quickly narrowed it down to just two: - it must work as it says it does (we test them) - it must use our developer resources – no screen scraping
  • They align with other guidelines. The Sunlight Foundation is a non-profit, nonpartisan organization that uses the power of the Internet to catalyze greater government openness and transparency, and provides new tools and resources for media and citizens, alike.
  • Data.gov participated in the GOSCON 2010 conference last month and they shared quite a bit of what they’ve learned so far in such a short amount of time. Developers want RAW digital data and a CATALOG so they can quickly understand what it is they’re working with.
  • Technology has changed.
  • What we also needed was a way to publish the schedules, not just next arrival times, in an automated and efficient manner.  The TimeTable Publisher was a brand new Hybrid Prius.  It did everything, was energy efficient, and saved hundreds of hours and dollars.  And, we were giving away!  But nobody wanted it. 
  •  Why? They didn’t know how to drive it and we didn’t have the resources to teach them. They can’t afford the insurance, or gas, or oil changes – everything you need to maintain a system: technical support, hardware, software customizations They aren’t mechanics, or developers, and they aren’t related to any.  Bottom Line?  Free is worthless if you can’t use the product.    
  • software with non-restrictive license allowing use, modification, and redistribution Examples: Who has used FireFox? OpenOffice? Who has heard of Linux? Apache?
  • Include Open Source Solutions in Feasibility Studies and Requirement Analysis (in addition to COTS) OS Code/Language – ex. can it be supported and maintained internally, does it adhere to IT standards Developer Base Working Implementations Terms and conditions of the OS license agreement Governance or Foundation Options for support and maintenance contracts No initial fee for the software, however, should calculate and compare long-term operating costs and resources against COTS
  • Include Open Source Solutions in Feasibility Studies and Requirement Analysis (in addition to COTS) OS Code/Language – ex. can it be supported and maintained internally, does it adhere to IT standards Developer Base Working Implementations Terms and conditions of the OS license agreement Governance or Foundation Options for support and maintenance contracts No initial fee for the software, however, should calculate and compare long-term operating costs and resources against COTS
  • Fairly extensive comparisons to COTS, OS and other custom options.
  • Fairly extensive comparisons to COTS, OS and other custom options.
  • We performed an alternatives analysis a couple years ago and looked at commercial off-the-shelf products, free APIs (Google, Yahoo), and open source software like GeoServer and MapServer.   We ’ re a Java shop so GeoServer complied with all our IT standards, and it fit all of our requirements - both internal agency mapping needs and external customer mapping needs.   Again, my biggest hesitation was support for this product, however, I would say its actually superior. We ’ ve gotten responses/support from users/developers all over the world. Its amazing. Basically, we ’ re using all open source technologies, including the OpenGeo Stack:   GeoServer, OpenLayers, and PostGIS.   Its all OGC standards compliant and we ’ ve been extremely happy with the sophistication of this technology and the level of world-wide support from the development community (and esp. from TOPP).  
  • Real-Time vehicle locations The idea was to bring as much information as possible into one application so that customers could make informed transit choices.
  • Next arrival info. Measure distance tool
  • Even though our map is pretty, and sophisticated, and it can do almost almost, it is single mode only.
  • MTA Chicago’s GoRoo funded by a Federal grant. $1m+ and 5 years. Benefits no one but Chicago. A-Train developed by David Emory. GraphServer developed by Brandon Martin Anderson Where’s My Bus developed by Brian Ferris
  • Project timeline July 2009- July 2011. TriMet received a grant to build an os mmtps.  The Open Planning Project (TOPP) http:// topp.openplans.org / is the primary contractor and the subs are David Emory/Five Points http:// trip.atltransit.com / , Brandon Martin Anderson/GraphServer (Bus Monster) http:// graphserver.sourceforge.net / , and TriMet (in-kind).  We're starting with David's code and building from there.  The objective is build a development community around the code and have TOPP/OpenGeo manage it so it’s a very viable alternative for agencies.  We have enough funding, but we need one other agency on board so its a collaborative effort to ensure continued success. In TOPP’s experience, the most successful os projects are collaborations, so this is critical. 
  • Open Plans has experience developing communities around open source software and data.
  • collaborative method to software design, development, distribution with access to source code
  • Collaborative method of tracking work and voting on important decisions.
  • architecture that allows adding, upgrading, swapping components
  • OSM is a free product available worldwide that supports geocoding. USGS-authored or produced data and information are considered to be in the U.S. public domain . GTFS is in an open data format.
  • It delivered a fully developed core product with versions running in: New York Poland Portland And Spain! And now India

Transcript

  • 1. Open Data and Open Source Implementation Initiatives at Local Level TriMet’s Experience with Open Source Software Implementations, Open Source Software Development, and Open Data IntelliDrive Mobility Workshop December 1, 2010 Presented by Bibiana McHugh, IT Manager of Spatial Technologies
  • 2.
      • Open Source Software
      • software with non-restrictive license allowing use, modification, and redistribution
      • Open Source
      • collaborative method to software design, development, distribution with access to source code
      • Open Architecture
      • architecture that allows adding, upgrading, swapping components
      • Open Data
      • data that is freely available to everyone
  • 3. On-Board GPS for AVL and Next Arrival Information
  • 4. Web Service for Next Arrival Info
  • 5. Google Transit
  • 6. Google Transit
  • 7. General Transit Feed Spec (GTFS)
  • 8. Third party apps using TriMet’s Open Data
  • 9. License Agreement Provides protection and defines Terms of Use Easy to understand
  • 10. Registration Process
    • Registration required only for web services to:
    • Acknowledge Terms of Use
    • For notification purposes
    • Monitor usage thresholds (tracks app ID, client IP address )
  • 11. TriMet’s Open Data Philosophy
    • don’t police data usage, don’t prescribe how it can be used
    • assume competition will weed out the less useful apps and make others better
    • make it as easy as possible for developers to access & understand data – no barriers
    • user complaints- suggest they contact developer directly
    • have mechanism for and be open to feedback from developers (forums)
    • don’t be exclusive to anyone and be inclusive to everyone (criteria for inclusion in App Center)
  • 12. 10 Principles for Open Government Data
    • Completeness
    • Primacy
    • Timeliness
    • Ease of physical and electronic access
    • Machine readability
    • Non-discrimination
    • Use of commonly owned standards
    • Licensing
    • Permanence
    • Usage costs
    • Source: Sunlight Foundation
  • 13. Open Data Just look at the numbers: 7 Other nations establishing open data 16 States now offering data sites 9 Cities in America with open data 236 New applications 253 Data contacts in Federal Agencies 305,709 Datasets available on Data.gov
  • 14. July 2009 over 50,000 apps and over 1 billion downloads
  • 15. Open Data City of Portland resolution directs the city government to open data to outside developers and encourages adoption of open source solutions in technology procurement 1. Made as much data available on civicapps – very quickly 2. Solicited ideas for applications and voting mechanism 2. Held 2 app contests requiring that winning app must be open source
  • 16. Open Source Software Advantages Proven method that works $0.00 Capital Cost Faster evolving software Broad user & support base
  • 17.
          • Free
          • Risky
          • Less Control
          • Less Support
  • 18. TimeTable Publisher TimeTable Publisher = Free Hybrid Car!
  • 19. TimeTable Publisher Free Hybrid Car! = $$$
  • 20. How is Open Source part of procurement when it’s free? Answer: It’s the first step Process for OS is identical to proprietary Look for open source alternatives in all procurements Put OS and commercial alternatives side by side before you look to buy Select to fit the need and meet your requirements
  • 21. Open Source Software Evaluation Criteria
    • OS Code/Language
      • can it be supported and maintained, does it adhere to internal IT standards
    • Active Community Support
          • how quickly are questions answered on support forums
    • Wide developer base
    • Working implementations
    • Terms and conditions of license
    • Options for support contracts
    • Calculate implementation costs, resources, short & long term operating costs
    • How customizable is it
  • 22. Software selections are increasingly open
  • 23. Software Alternatives Analysis
  • 24. Detailed Requirements Analysis of Top Candidates
  • 25. dotProject – Real Property Management System
  • 26. Open Source Interactive System Map
  • 27. Open Source Interactive System Map
  • 28. Open Source Interactive System Map
  • 29. Open Source Interactive System Map
  • 30. Google Trends – Most Popular Searches by City
  • 31. Single-Mode Trip Planners
  • 32. Multi-Mode Trip Planners
  • 33. Open Source Multi-Modal Trip Planner OpenTripPlanner.org Project
    • Task 1. Project Management Plan
        • Project Initiation Workshop
        • July 15-17, 2009
    Task 2. Develop and implement the software Jan 2011 Task 3. Evaluation Study May 2011 Task 4. Develop Final Report June 2011
  • 34. Open Plans
  • 35. Open Source Development Method
  • 36. OpenTripPlanner.org
  • 37. Open Source Development Method
  • 38. Open Architecture Client Application Geocoding Service Web Services API Address Normalizer Service Etc. Routing Service Data API Shapefiles Oracle OSM OpenStreetMap Regional Data PostGIS Adapter Adapter Adapter Adapter Adapter
  • 39. Open Data / Free Data
  • 40. what can OPEN deliver in 9 months?
  • 41. what can OPEN deliver in 9 months?
  • 42. what can OPEN deliver in 9 months?
  • 43. Support Options
  • 44. Data Options
  • 45.  
  • 46. Thank You! CONTACT: Bibiana McHugh IT Manager of Spatial Technologies [email_address] VISIT: maps.trimet.org developer.trimet.org opentripplanner.org