Digital Games in Classrooms: An Example of Math-Blaster

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Digital Games in Classrooms: An Example of Math-Blaster

  1. 1. Using Digital Games in the Classroom: an example of Math Blaster by King Chu and Brittney Huntington
  2. 2. Digital Math Games in the Classroom <ul><li>Student Populations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Beck and Wade (2004): Drill and practice games </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Satwicz and Stevens (2008): Quantitative representations and transfer </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Specific Populations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Butler et al. (2001): Children with mild and moderate mental retardation </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. History of Math-blaster
  4. 4. Literature on the use of Math-blaster in classrooms <ul><li>Commercially available </li></ul><ul><li>Criticized in previous video game research </li></ul><ul><li>Squire (2006): Math-Blaster an Exogenous game </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge: discrete facts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning: memorizing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instruction: drill and practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BUT: Satwicz and Stevens (2008) findings on drill and practice training found in Math-blaster. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Math-blaster Game Components <ul><li>Set of drill and practice activities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Addition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Subtraction </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Math-Blaster Game Components <ul><li>Multiplication </li></ul><ul><li>Division </li></ul>
  7. 7. Math-Blaster Components <ul><li>1. Look and Learn : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mayer’s pre-training and modality principle </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Math-Blaster Components <ul><li>2) Build Your Skill </li></ul>
  9. 9. Math-Blaster Components <ul><li>3) Challenge Yourself </li></ul>
  10. 10. Math-Blaster Components <ul><li>4) Math-Blaster </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Segmenting </li></ul></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Math-blaster Game Components <ul><li>Problems with </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Coherence </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Math-Blaster Components <ul><li>Also problems with Spatial Contiguity </li></ul>
  13. 13. Design of Math-Blaster Interfaces <ul><ul><li>Poor data-ink ratio </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tufte (1983) </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Design of Math-Blaster Interfaces
  15. 15. Design of Math-Blaster Interfaces
  16. 16. Design of Math-Blaster Interfaces <ul><li>Appearance of Bilateral Symmetry </li></ul><ul><li>Tufte (1983) </li></ul>
  17. 17. Design of Math-Blaster Interfaces <ul><li>“ Friendly Graphics” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Color-blindness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Elliot and Norris (1998) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tufte (1983) </li></ul>
  18. 18. Math-blaster Design <ul><li>Affordances </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Controls </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Individual differences in presence of instructions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rocket Function </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Math-Blaster Design <ul><li>Conceptual Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Character Development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Blaster, GC, and Spot </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Norman (1990) </li></ul>
  20. 20. Math Blaster Design <ul><li>Feedback </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Visual Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auditory Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Norman (1990) </li></ul>
  21. 21. Incorporation of Math-blaster in classrooms instruction <ul><li>For Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Elliot and Norris (1998) </li></ul><ul><li>Math Vocabulary </li></ul><ul><li>individual and group instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Progress tracking </li></ul><ul><ul><li>However: Becker (2006) </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Incorporation of Math-blaster in Classroom Instruction <ul><li>For Students </li></ul><ul><li>Engaging graphics (Elliot and Norris, 1998) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Exposure? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Tracking Progress </li></ul><ul><li>Socialization </li></ul>
  23. 23. References <ul><li>Becker, K. (2006). Classifying learning objectives in commercial games. Authors and Canadian Games Study Association . </li></ul><ul><li>Butler, F., Miller, S., Lee, K., Pierce, T. (2001). Teaching mathematics to students with mild-to-moderate mental retardation: A review of the literature. Mental Retardation , 39 (1), 20-31. </li></ul><ul><li>Hummel, J. (1985). Math-Blaster courseware review. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 18, 241-242. </li></ul><ul><li>Mayer, R. (2005). The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning. Cambridge University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>New York Times: http://video.nytimes.com/video/2010/09/15/magazine/1248069030957/games-theory.html. Retrieved 12/14/2010 by Brittney Huntington </li></ul>
  24. 24. References <ul><li>Norman, D. (1990). The Design of Everyday Things. Doubleday Business. </li></ul><ul><li>Satwicz, T., and Stevens, R. (2008). Playing with representations: How do kids make use of quantitative representations in video games? International Journal of Computers for Mathematical Learning , 13, 179-206. </li></ul><ul><li>Squire, K. (2006). From content to context: Videogames as designed experience. Educational Researcher , 35 (8), 19-29. </li></ul><ul><li>Soloway, E., Norris, C. (1998). Using technology to address old problems in new ways. Communications of the AMC , 41, 11-18. </li></ul><ul><li>Tufte, E. R. (1983). The Visual Display of Quantitative Information. Graphics Press. </li></ul>

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