ACKNOWLEDGEMENT<br />It is always acknowledged so precious a debt as that of learning. It is...
“Assessment of most selling staples & FMCG products in mop & pop stores close to ‘more’ retail outlets in Jaipur & designi...
Purpose of Research:-</li></ul>To identify proper assortment mix of Aditya Birla’s  ‘more’ retail outlets differencing  in...
In fig 1.2 it can be seen that 42% people in A-catchment purchase lalquila and 28%  purchase india gate and rest daawat an...
This shows that people in A-catchment are not price sensitive, they are ready to pay the price if they get the quality.</l...
In fig 1.3 it can be seen that 60% of people purchase aashirwaad sarbati and 30% laxmibhog and rest 10% is for shakti bhog.
So, from the above findings the resercher can once again conclude that people of A-catchment are not price sensitive rathe...
In fig 1.4 it can be seen that 70% of shopkeepers say that people here basically ask for 10 kg packet and only a few 30% a...
Category  : DAL
Fig 1.5 type of Dal preferred
In fig 1.5 it can be seen that 50%  people of A–catchment generally prefer having moong mogar  and 30% prefer having moong...
In fig 1.6  it can be seen that saras and amul dominates this category with having a share of 40% each and rest 20% is sha...
In fig 1.7 frotune oil covers maximum market share with 40% ands next to it are saffola and chamble with share of 30% each...
Category : Sampoo  Fig 1.8                                                         Catregory : Bathing soap  fig 1.9</li><...
In Fig 1.9  lux and dettol covers 40% each and lifebuy and pears 10% each.
So it can be concluded from above that people are very helth concious as 40% use dettol soap .</li></ul>   Fig 1.10     Ca...
In fig 1.10 rin and oswal having a share of 40% each and 20% is covered by wheel . So, it can be noted oswal shop shares 4...
In fig 1.11 rin , surf excel  and tide share 30% each and rest 10 % is shared by ariel In this category people genrally go...
In fig 1.13 ponds share 40 %, 30% Is shared by axe and dermicool ,nycil nad boroplus share 10% each.
So it can be observed from above that few are very brand loyal while this category also have population which are not very...
In fig 1.2 it can be seen that 40% people in B-catchment purchase rice priced between 31-35 and 30%  purchase between 26-30 .
This shows that people in B-catchment are price sensitive, but in accordance with price they also lookfor quality.
Category : AATA</li></ul>   Fig 1.3     In packet which brand :                                                     Fig 1....
In fig 1.3 it can be seen that 40% of people purchase laxmi bhoj and 30% aasirwad sarbati and 20% is for aamrit bhog and r...
So, from the above findings the resercher can once again conclude that people of B-catchment are price sensitive as 40% pu...
In fig 1.4 it can be seen that 70% of shopkeepers say that people here basically ask for 10 kg
Category  : DAL
Fig 1.5 type of Dal preferred
In fig 1.5 it can be seen that 50%  people of B–catchment generally prefer having moong mogar  and 30% prefer having moong...
In fig 1.6  it can be seen that saras and milkfood dominates this category with having a share of 30% each and rest 40% is...
In fig 1.7 chambal oil covers maximum market share with 50% ands next to it is fortune and rest 10% is shared by saffola. ...
Category : Sampoo  Fig 1.8                                                         Catregory : Bathing soap  fig 1.9</li><...
In Fig 1.9  dettol covers 40% each and lifebuy  around 30 %.
So it can be concluded from above that people are very helth concious as 40% use dettol soap .</li></ul>  Fig 1.10     Cat...
In fig 1.10 rin and oswal having a share of 40% each and 20% is covered by wheel . So, it can be noted oswal shop shares 4...
In fig 1.11 rin , surf excel  and tide share 30% each and rest 10 % is shared by ariel In this category people genrally go...
In fig 1.13 ponds share 40 %, 30% Is shared by axe and dermicool ,nycil nad boroplus share 10% each.
So it can be observed from above that few are very brand loyal while this category also have population which are not very...
 In fig 1.2 it can be seen that 40% people in C-catchment purchase rice priced between 21-25 and 30%  purchase between 15-...
This shows that people in C-catchment are very price sensitive, the main factor for purchasing any product from any place ...
Category : AATA</li></ul>   Fig 1.3     In packet which brand :                                                     Fig 1....
In fig 1.3 it can be seen that 40% of people purchase laxmi bhoj and 30% sakti bhog and 20% is for aamrit bhog and rest 10...
So, from the above findings the resercher can once again conclude that people of C-catchment are price sensitive as  90% o...
In fig 1.4 it can be seen that 70% of shopkeepers say that people here basically ask for 10 kg
Category : DAL
In fig 1.5 it can be seen that 50%  people of B–catchment generally prefer having moong mogar  and 30% prefer having moong...
In fig 1.6  it can be seen that branded ones account to 70% of sale , while 30% purchase it loose.so it can be said that p...
In fig 1.7 chambal oil covers maximum market share with 50% ands next to it is fortune and rest 10% is shared by engine.
Category : Sampoo  Fig 1.8                                                         Catregory : Bathing soap  fig 1.9</li><...
In Fig 1.9  all soaps share equally 20% each.
So it can be concluded from above that people are very helth concious as 40% use dettol soap .</li></ul>  Fig 1.10     Cat...
In fig 1.10 rin and oswal having a share of 40% each and 20% is covered by wheel . So, it can be noted oswal shop shares 4...
In fig 1.11 rin , rin  and tide share 30% each and rest 40 % is shared by others. In this category people  of C-catchment ...
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Assessment of most selling staples & FMCG products in mop & pop stores close to ‘more’ retail outlets in Jaipur & designing an appropriate strategy for enhancing the category volume in ‘more’ retail outlets”

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Assessment of most selling staples & FMCG products in mop & pop stores close to ‘more’ retail outlets in Jaipur & designing an appropriate strategy for enhancing the category volume in ‘more’ retail outlets”

  1. 1. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT<br />It is always acknowledged so precious a debt as that of learning. It is the only debt that is difficult to reply through gratitude. It is indeed a great opportunity for me to pen down a few lines about people to whom my acknowledgement is due.<br />I would like to acknowledge my deep sense of gratitude tour director Dr. Raghuveer Singh for providing me adequete help and support.<br />Last but not the least I would also like to thanks my all those friends and all those respondents who could not find a separate name but has help me directly or indirectly.<br />Ravi Chandak<br />PGDM (2007- 09)<br />CIPS-Jaipur<br />Executive summary<br />The project titled “Assessment of most selling staples & FMCG products in mop & pop stores close to ‘more’ retail outlets in Jaipur & designing an appropriate strategy for enhancing the category volume in ‘more’ retail outlets” is made for Aditya Birla Retail Ltd. The project came into act with a discussion when I was doing my summer training in Aditya Birla, the discussion was about that a lot of research work is being made on consumers, what they want, what they prefer but after the application of these research work the company is still facing stiff problem in right assortment mix in staples & FMCG category. <br />So a research work started and the objective of research was to find our proper assortment mix for ‘more’ in different areas, it was descriptive in nature as variables were known to us and then questionnaire was appropriately designed and sample size taken was 5 shopkeepers from each catchment area and 2 stores of each catchment area was to be taken, summing up to a total of 60 shops. As the research started the researcher faced many problems , the shopkeepers were very resistive . <br />Finally the findings so derived after the research was that there are many non branded products which covers a major share in all 3 catchments for<br /> e.g. Oswal soap , while there are few products which are common in all catchments so their MBQ should be kept high. A detailed analysis of the research is discussed below.<br />Contents<br />Chapter no.ParticularsPage No.1.Introduction2.Conceptual Framework3.Company Profile4.Research Methodology5.Data Findings and Analysis7.Recommendations8.Limitations9.ConclusionAnnexure 1QuestionnaireBibliography<br />Introduction<br />As we enter 2008 retailers across the country speak about their vision of change for the years ahead. It is evident that customer retention is top of mind for every retailer, regardless of format or size.<br />For all the talk of growth rate of Super markets, the l market remains highly fragmented. For an idea of just how fragmented the market is, look at the top two players: Reliance Retail and Spencers Retail with many new companies entering into this field. In India the organized retail covers a very low share of% and is subjected to increase to 12% in coming couple of years. <br />In such a high fragmented market an organization for not just to retain customers, but also to expand its consumer base have to make continuous innovation, innovation in product, in operations, in retail environment, in services, in everything. If your stores cannot generate unforgettable consumer experiences, well, as the cliché goes, don’t blame it on Rio then, the problem lies somewhere else.<br />Talking about the super markets, the consumer experiences can be generated by concentrating on proper assortment mix which is an important strategic tool in retail marketing. <br /> <br />Conceptual Framework<br />Retailing<br />In an ideal business world, most marketers would prefer to handle all their distribution activities by way of the corporate channel arrangement we discussed in the Distribution Decisions Tutorial.  Such an arrangement provides the marketer with two important benefits.  First, being responsible for all distribution means the marketing organization need only worry about making decisions concerning their product.  When others, such as resellers, are involved in distribution attention is not given to a single supplier but is stretched across all products the reseller carries.  Second, having control on all distribution means the marketer is always in direct contact with buyers of their products, which can make it easier to build strong, long-term relationships with customers.<br />Unfortunately, as we saw in the last tutorial, for many marketing organizations a corporate channel arrangement is not feasible.  Whether due to high cost or lack of experience needed to run a channel efficiently, the majority of marketing organizations rely on third parties to get their products into the hands of customers.<br />In the next two sections of the Principles of Marketing Tutorials we examine the key parties through which marketers seek distribution assistance.  Choosing which parties to aid in product distribution is important since a distributor’s actions can affect how customers view the marketer and the products they offer.  As we discussed in the Targeting Markets Tutorial, a customer’s perception of a product affects how they mentally position the product in relation to competitive products.  How a product is distributed, including where it is located (e.g., reputation of resellers from whom they purchase) and customer experience with the purchasing process (e.g., how long to receive, condition when received), will impact a customer’s feelings about the product which in turn affects how a customer positions the product in their mind.<br />Retailing Defination<br />Retailing is a distribution channel function where one organization buys products from supplying firms or manufactures the product themselves, and then sells these directly to consumers.  A retailer is a reseller (i.e., obtains product from one party in order to sell to another) from which a consumer purchases products.  In the US alone there are over 1,100,000 retailers according to the 2002 US Census of Retail Trade.<br />In the majority of retail situations, the organization from which a consumer makes purchases is a reseller of products obtained from others and not the product manufacturer.  But as we discussed in the Distribution Decisions Tutorial, some manufacturers also operate their own retail outlets in a corporate channel arrangement.  While consumers are the retailer’s buyers, a consumer does not always buy from retailers.  For instance, when a consumer purchases from another consumer (e.g., eBay) the consumer purchase would not be classified as a retail purchase.  This distinction can get confusing but in the US and other countries the dividing line is whether the one selling to consumers is classified as a business (e.g., legal and tax purposes) or is selling as a hobby without a legal business standing.<br />As a reseller, retailers offer many benefits to suppliers and customers as we discussed in the Distribution Decisions Tutorial.  For consumers the most important benefits relate to the ability to purchase small quantities of a wide assortment of products at prices that are considered reasonably affordable.  For suppliers the most important benefits relate to offering opportunities to reach their target market, build product demand through retail promotions, and provide consumer feedback to the product marketer.<br />Concerns of Retailers<br />Retailers are faced with many issues as they attempt to be successful.  The key issues include:<br />Customer Satisfaction – Retailers know that satisfied customers are loyal customers.  Consequently, retailers must develop strategies intended to build relationships that result in customers returning to make more purchases. <br />Ability to Acquire the Right Products – A customer will only be satisfied if they can purchase the right products to satisfy their needs.  Since a large percentage of retailers do not manufacture their own products, they must seek suppliers who will supply products demanded by customers.  Thus, an important objective for retailers is to identify the products customers will demand and negotiate with suppliers to obtain these products. <br />Product Presentation – Once obtained products must be presented or merchandised to customers in a way that generates interest.  Retail merchandising often requires hiring creative people who understand and can relate to the market. <br />Traffic Building – Like any marketer, retailers must use promotional methods to build customer interest.  For retailers a key measure of interest is the number of people visiting a retail location or website.  Building “traffic” is accomplished with a variety of promotional techniques such as advertising, including local newspapers or Internet, and specialized promotional activities, such as coupons. <br />Layout– For store-based retailers a store’s physical layout is an important component in creating a retail experience that will attract customers.  The physical layout is more than just deciding in what part of the store to locate products.  For many retailers designing the right shopping atmosphere (e.g., objects, light, sound) can add to the appeal of a store.  Layout is also important in the online world where site navigation and usability may be deciding factors in whether of a retail website is successful. <br />Location – Where to physically locate a retail store may help or hinder store traffic.  Well placed stores with high visibility and easy access, while possibly commanding higher land usage fees, may hold significantly more value than lower cost sites that yield less traffic.  Understanding the trade-off between costs and benefits of locations is an important retail decision. <br />Keeping Pace With Technology – Technology has invaded all areas of retailing including customer knowledge (e.g., customer relationship management software), product movement (e.g., use of RFID tags for tracking), point-of-purchase (e.g., scanners, kiosks, self-serve checkout), web technologies (e.g., online shopping carts, purchase recommendations) and many more.<br />Retailing in India<br />India retail industry is the largest industry in India, with an employment of around 8% and contributing to over 10% of the country's GDP. Retail industry in India is expected to rise 25% yearly being driven by strong income growth, changing lifestyles, and favorable demographic patterns. It is expected that by 2016 modern retail industry in India will be worth US$ 175- 200 billion. India retail industry is one of the fastest growing industries with revenue expected in 2007 to amount US$ 320 billion and is increasing at a rate of 5% yearly. A further increase of 7-8% is expected in the industry of retail in India by growth in consumerism in urban areas, rising incomes, and a steep rise in rural consumption. It has further been predicted that the retailing industry in India will amount to US$ 21.5 billion by 2010 from the current size of US$ 7.5 billion. Shopping in India have witnessed a revolution with the change in the consumer buying behavior and the whole format of shopping also altering. Industry of retail in India which have become modern can be seen from the fact that there are multi- stored malls, huge shopping centers, and sprawling complexes which offer food, shopping, and entertainment all under the same roof. <br />Retail industry<br />Even though India has well over 5 million retail outlets of all sizes and styles (or non-styles), the country sorely lacks anything that can resemble a retailing industry in the modern sense of the term. This presents international retailing specialists with a great opportunity. <br />It was only in the year 2000 that the global management consultancy AT Kearney put a figure to it: Rs. 400,000 crore (1 crore = 10 million) which will increase to Rs. 800,000 crore by the year 2005 – an annual increase of 20 per cent. <br />Retailing in India is thoroughly unorganised. There is no supply chain management perspective. According to a survey b y AT Kearney,  an overwhelming proportion of the Rs. 400,000 crore retail market is UNORGANISED. In fact, only a Rs. 20,000 crore segment of the market is organised. <br />As much as 96 per cent of the 5 million-plus outlets are smaller than 500 square feet in area. This means that India per capita retailing space is about 2 square feet (compared to 16 square feet in the United States). India's per capita retailing space is thus the lowest in the world (source: KSA Technopak (I) Pvt Ltd, the India operation of the US-based Kurt Salmon Associates). <br />Just over 8 per cent of India's population is engaged in retailing (compared to 20 per cent in the United States). There is no data on this sector's contribution to the GDP. <br />From a size of only Rs.20,000 crore, the ORGANISED retail industry will grow to Rs. 160,000 crore by 2005. The TOTAL retail market, however, as indicated above will grow 20 per cent annually from Rs. 400,000 crore in 2000 to Rs. 800,000 crore by 2005 (source: survey by AT Kearney) <br />Given the size, and the geographical, cultural and socio-economic diversity of India, there is no role model for Indian suppliers and retailers to adapt or expand in the Indian context. <br />The first challenge facing the organised retail industry in India is: competition from the unorganised sector. Traditional retailing has established in India for some centuries. It is a low cost structure, mostly owner-operated, has negligible real estate and labour costs and little or no taxes to pay. Consumer familiarity that runs from generation to generation is one big advantage for the traditional retailing sector. <br />In contrast, players in the organised sector have big expenses to meet, and yet have to keep prices low enough to be able to compete with the traditional sector. High costs for the organised sector arises from: higher labour costs, social security to employees, high quality real estate, much bigger premises, comfort facilities such as air-conditioning, back-up power supply, taxes etc. Organised retailing also has to cope with the middle class psychology that the bigger and brighter a sales outlet is, the more expensive it will be. <br />The above should not be seen as a gloomy foreboding from global retail operators. International retail majors such as Benetton, Dairy Farm and Levis have already entered the market. Lifestyles in India are changing and the concept of " value for money" is picking up. <br />India's first true shopping mall – complete with food courts, recreation facilities and large car parking space – was inaugurated as lately as in 1999 in Mumbai. (this mall is called " Crossroads" ). <br />Local companies and local-foreign joint ventures are expected to more advantageously positioned than the purely foreign ones in the fledgling organised India's retailing industry. <br />These drawbacks present opportunity to international and/or professionally managed Indian corporations to pioneer a modern retailing industry in India and benefit from it. <br />The prospects are very encouraging. The first steps towards sophisticated retailing are being taken, and " Crossroads" is the best example of this awakening. More such malls have been planned in the other big cities of India. <br />An FDI Confidence Index survey done by AT Kearney, retail industry is one of the most attractive sectors for FDI (foreign direct investment) in India and foreign retail chains would make an impact circa 2003.<br />Strategy<br />Strategy is the means by which objectives are pursued and obtained over time. This class will enable learners to apply strategic thinking to their lives, through understanding strategy and putting it into practice.<br />Military strategy is very comparable to any other form of planning. It is geared to governing a very large group of individuals towards a very incredible goal in a highly capricious environment under astounding constraints of space and time. That any military operations succeed at all is a testament to humanity’s skill at the art of strategic planning. Military organizations have therefore got a great deal of the strategic planning process down to a science. This science begins in administration and continues from there.<br />Any organization charged with a goal to accomplish must go through a process of strategic planning. The problem is, not many groups fully understand how to formulate a strategic plan that is at the same time parsimonious and flexible. Most organizations attempt to perform strategic planning in the wrong order. Many see risk analyses as the first step to be followed, some people simply break down tasks by looking at the deadlines and performing first those that must be finished earliest. A cogent and regular system of decision making is not often employed.<br />Some of the best policy-makers, however, look to the objective for their inspiration while planning. This is the optimum mode of strategic planning, and is successful more often than not. It does not, however, start at the very beginning of the strategic planning process. Strategic planning begins with organization. Before anything else, or at least in tandem with the formulation of an objective, roles and responsibilities must be given to those who will work in the execution of operations that will eventually end in the attainment of an objective.<br />Strategic planning, therefore, begins with simple administration. “The Army,” after all, “marches on its stomach.” Without adequate administration in place, logistics will not flow. When logistics do not flow, the army cannot function. What’s more, to extend the culinary metaphor, “too many cooks spoil the broth.” Overlapping responsibility not only begets a lack of parsimony, but it can create confusion at the level of command. The first step to strategic planning, therefore, is to make certain the organization charged with accomplishing a task is administrated effectively. The second stage is planning.<br />The intent of this Class is to give a very brief discussion of certain aspects of military administration in their ideal forms, and then discuss strategic planning from a very high level of conceptualization. Basic ideas about administration are rooted in the concept of chain of command, which delimit roles and responsibilities. The roots of strategic planning are to be found in the identification of an objective, and the processes used in planning how to attain it.<br />For those who have not read Sun Tzu’s military classic, the quote given above may seem mundane and unspectacular. Sun Tzu’s mastery of war did not, however, come from crafty plans and perfect stratagems. Though he understood the nature of deception and manoeuvre, one of his greatest successes was knowing how to manage an army. One of the most important aspects of army management is the chain of command. Understanding of the chain of command is essential to the functioning of any large organization. Without adequate definition, rank structures can blur, and lines that separate areas of responsibility can be crossed. Such a situation creates waste, and is to be avoided. Firm but flexible definition of roles and levels of command eliminates overlap and creates efficiency.<br />The modern concept of military strategy has four basic classifications that are useful for understanding this concept in any organizational context. They are Grand Strategy, Strategy, Operations, and Tactics. These four basic ideas are at the root of the usefulness of military rank structure. They also assist in dividing responsibility between levels of the chain of command so that there is no overlap. These terms will be defined further in the next section.<br />The successes of the Roman Legion, for example, were to a great extent based upon its superb organizational structure. The capabilities of humans are only as good as the work environment into which they are put. It was the Legion’s administration that made the Legionnaire so much more capable than the Gallic tribesman. His work environment was well structured to utilizing him in the best way possible. Marches were measured, each man carried an equal sized pack, the art of encastramentation (constructing camps) was perfected, each man had a grain mill and adequate supplies of food. The Legion was thus a policy tool with exceptional utility to policy makers. When a Senator wanted to know how long it would take an army to get to its destination, he would measure it in marches, thus he knew how many days it would walk, how much food was needed, as well as how much pay and salt to take for the troops. Furthermore, the army had astounding battlefield flexibility. It was organized into four ranks of specialists, (Velites, Hastati, Principes, Triarii), as well as being divided into ten cohorts of three maniples each plus auxilia. Every section was an army in and of itself which could be used flexibly because of the adequate training of each commander at every level of command.<br />Firm definition of the chain of command is thus not a process which ossifies an organization into inaction, but a process of liberation through accurate definition. Workers function better when they have been given a margin of manoeuvre that is well defined. A private, for example, who relies on his sergeant to tell him when he can breathe is a useless private (with a useless sergeant, for that matter). Granted, this is an overstatement of fact, but a private who is told “you man that machine gun and cover this field of fire” is a useful private who frees his sergeant to do work in other areas. When the sergeant has to stay at the foxhole to tell the private what to shoot at, both of the troops are rendered less useful. The chain of command assists in avoiding this kind of overlap<br />The Four Levels of Strategic Planning<br />The Levels of Strategic Planning: the Levels of Strategic Planning provide for a starting point from which to organize a decision-making matrix. The four levels correspond also to ranks of military command and general areas of interest in the planning of a military operation. These levels of analysis are useful as they specify exact areas of responsibility for Command, Control, Communication, and Intelligence (henceforth C3I) far more than do the simple terms “operational” and “policy.” Planning at the highest levels is the most general and ethereal; the lowest levels are all the more specific and concrete.<br />Grand Strategy Political direction. As Clausewitz so accurately observed, “war is politics carried out by other means.” The Grand Strategic decision-making process includes the decision to go to war, the drafting of Rules of Engagement, and the decision on the GOALS to be achieved by a military operation. The ruling government is at this level in military strategy. It plans wars.<br />Strategy High-level military planning. This work primarily involves LOGISTICS. The goals set are of lesser scope than those of Grand Strategy, which is concerned with the whole war. Strategy is concerned with dividing the war into theatres, supplying forces in these theatres, and harmonizing the Operational objectives in-theatre to the general battle-plan. Once the army has been given its objectives by the state, the Generals decide how best to achieve these aims. Generals plan campaigns.<br />Operations (Grand Tactics) In-theatre manoeuvre and attainment of limited objectives planned by the General Staff. This work involves MANAGEMENT of forces which are attempting to make headway towards Tactical goals which must be harmonized with the Strategic and in-theatre goals. Field/senior officers (Colonels, Lt. Colonels, to a degree Majors) are charged with utilizing supplies provided at the Strategic level to achieve their limited goals. These officers plan battles.<br />Tactics Short-term, easily identifiable objectives. With simple goals set by the Operational level of command, the tactical goals are all bite-sized parts and parcels of the higher level game plan. This level is primarily concerned with IMPLEMENTATION, and the personnel employed here, though not necessarily long-term planners, are technically proficient and capable. Junior officers and senior Non-Comissioned Officers manage combat. Securing and defending geographic points, persons, or denying the same to the enemy are easily identifiable tactical goals. This level takes objectives within a battle.<br />The Objective<br />In all strategic decision making, the objective must be held above all other considerations. By this it is meant that the plan is secondary to the objective. Plans are thus made to reflect the objective first, and other considerations second. Sun Tzu makes a very astute commentary about this aspect of planning. He says “He wins his battles by making no mistakes. Making no mistakes is what establishes the certainty of victory, for it means conquering an enemy that is already defeated.” This simple phrase accentuates the importance of planning in the attainment of strategic goals. Objectives are not attained in the heat of the moment with all your units working twenty hours a day, seven days a week. While this is proof of a dedicated team and expert unit leaders, it is not a good reflection on the strategic planning process. Sometimes such rushes are unavoidable, but better weather a rush while one is leisurely approaching an accurate deadline than while rushing to complete another project. Planning is how you defeat the problem or attain the objective before actually beginning work. Sun Tzu would say, “What the ancients called a clever fighter is one who not only wins, but excels in winning with ease. Hence his victories bring him neither reputation for wisdom nor credit for courage.”<br />Assurance of victory in this sense is accurate budgetary, time, and manpower assessments. Deadlines are set with the knowledge of the capabilities of the organization, just as the logistical constraints of the Legion were known because of its firm administration. Measurement and estimation is at the heart of achievement. In order for plans to succeed, they must be made early and accurate. In order to do this, a great range of expertise is required. This is why planning is necessarily an iterative process. Planning considerations must incorporate the need for change. Since expertise is required, that expertise must be used in a parsimonious fashion.<br />Company profile<br /> <br /> <br /> Aditya Birla Group<br /> VisionTo be a premium global conglomeratewith a clear focus on each business.<br />MissionTo deliver superior value to our customers, shareholders, employees and society at large. Values<br />IntegrityCommitmentPassionSeamlessnessSpeed<br />HISTORY <br />The roots of the Aditya Birla Group date back to the 19th century in the picturesque town of Pilani, set amidst the Rajasthan desert. It was here that Seth Shiv Narayan Birla started trading in cotton, laying the foundation for the House of Birlas.<br />Through India's arduous times of the 1850s, the Birla business expanded rapidly. In the early part of the 20th century, our Group's founding father, Ghanshyamdas Birla, set up industries in critical sectors such as textiles and fibre, aluminium, cement and chemicals. As a close confidante of Mahatma Gandhi, he played an active role in the Indian freedom struggle. He represented India at the first and second round-table conference in London, along with Gandhiji. It was at " Birla House" in Delhi that the luminaries of the Indian freedom struggle often met to plot the downfall of the British Raj.<br />Ghanshyamdas Birla found no contradiction in pursuing business goals with the dedication of a saint, emerging as one of the foremost industrialists of pre-independence India. The principles by which he lived were soaked up by his grandson, Aditya Vikram Birla, our Group's legendary leader. <br />Aditya Vikram Birla: putting India on the world mapA formidable force in Indian industry, Mr. Aditya Birla dared to dream of setting up a global business empire at the age of 24. He was the first to put Indian business on the world map, as far back as 1969, long before globalisation became a buzzword in India.<br />In the then vibrant and free market South East Asian countries, he ventured to set up world-class production bases. He had foreseen the winds of change and staked the future of his business on a competitive, free market driven economy order. He put Indian business on the globe, 22 years before economic liberalisation was formally introduced by the former Prime Minister, Mr. Narasimha Rao and the former Union Finance Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh. He set up 19 companies outside India, in Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Egypt. <br />Interestingly, for Mr. Aditya Birla, globalisation meant more than just geographic reach. He believed that a business could be global even whilst being based in India. Therefore, back in his home-territory, he drove single-mindedly to put together the building blocks to make our Indian business a global force. Under his stewardship, his companies rose to be the world's largest producer of viscose staple fibre, the largest refiner of palm oil, the third largest producer of insulators and the sixth largest producer of carbon black. In India, they attained the status of the largest single producer of viscose filament yarn, apart from being a producer of cement, grey cement and rayon grade pulp. The Group is also the largest producer of aluminium in the private sector, the lowest first cost producers in the world and the only producer of linen in the textile industry in India. <br />At the time of his untimely demise, the Group's revenues crossed Rs.8,000 crore globally, with assets of over Rs.9,000 crore, comprising of 55 benchmark quality plants, an employee strength of 75,000 and a shareholder community of 600,000. <br />Most importantly, his companies earned respect and admiration of the people, as one of India's finest business houses, and the first Indian International Group globally. Through this outstanding record of enterprise, he helped create enormous wealth for the nation, and respect for Indian entrepreneurship in South East Asia. In his time, his success was unmatched by any other industrialist in India. <br />That India attains respectable rank among the developed nations, was a dream he forever cherished. He was proud of India and took equal pride in being an Indian.<br />Under the leadership of our Chairman, Mr. Kumar Mangalam Birla, the Group has sustained and established a leadership position in its key businesses through continuous value-creation. Spearheaded by Grasim, Hindalco, Aditya Birla Nuvo, Indo Gulf Fertilisers and companies in Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Egypt, the Aditya Birla Group is a leader in a swathe of products — viscose staple fibre, aluminium, cement, copper, carbon black, palm oil, insulators, garments. And with successful forays into financial services, telecom, software and BPO, the Group is today one of Asia's most diversified business groups.<br />MANAGEMENT GROUP<br />The Aditya Birla Management Corporation Private Limited, is the Group's apex decision making body and provides strategic direction to Group companies. Its Board of Directors comprises:::Mr. Kumar Mangalam Birla, Chairman::Mr. S. Aga::Mr. D. Bhattacharya::Mr. S. K. Jain::Dr. S. Misra::Mr. S. Misra::Dr. B. K. Singh::Mr. K. K. Maheshwari::Mr. Vikram Rao::Mr. Ajay Srinivasan A US $28 billion corporation, the Aditya Birla Group is in the league of Fortune 500. It is anchored by an extraordinary force of 100,000 employees, belonging to 25 different nationalities. In India, the Group has been adjudged " The Best Employer in India and among the top 20 in Asia" by the Hewitt-Economic Times and Wall Street Journal Study 2007. Over 50 per cent of its revenues flow from its overseas operations. The Group operates in 25 countries — India, UK, Germany, Hungary, Brazil, Italy, France, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Australia, USA, Canada, Egypt, China, Thailand, Laos, Indonesia, Philippines, Dubai, Singapore, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Malaysia and Korea. Globally the Aditya Birla Group is: ::A metals powerhouse, among the world's most cost-efficient aluminium and copper producers. Hindalco-Novelis is the largest aluminium rolling company. It is one of the three biggest producers of primary aluminium in Asia, with the largest single location copper smelter::No.1 in viscose staple fibre::The fourth largest producer of insulators ::The fourth largest producer of carbon black::The 11th largest cement producer globally::Among the world's top 15 BPO companies and among India's top three::Among the best energy efficient fertiliser plantsIn India: ::A premier branded garments player ::The second largest player in viscose filament yarn::The second largest in the chlor-alkali sector::Among the top five mobile telephony companies ::A leading player in life insurance and asset management ::Among the top three supermarket chains in the retail businessRock solid in fundamentals, the Aditya Birla Group nurtures a culture where success does not come in the way of the need to keep learning afresh, to keep experimenting.Beyond business — the Aditya Birla Group is:::Working in 3,700 villages ::Reaching out to seven million people annually through the Aditya Birla Centre for Community Initiatives and Rural Development, spearheaded by Mrs. Rajashree Birla ::Focusing on: health care, education, sustainable livelihood, infrastructure and espousing social causes ::Running 41 schools and 18 hospitals Transcending the conventional barriers of business to send out a message that " We care" . right0<br />key products and brandslocationscapacitiescountryHindalco Industries Ltd. alumina chemicalsRenukoot (Uttar Pradesh), Muri (Jharkhand), Belgaum (Karnataka)1,160,000 tpaIndiaprimary aluminiumRenukoot, Hirakud (Orissa), *Taloja489,000 tpaextrusionsRenukoot, Alupuram 27,700 tparolled products Belur(West Bengal), Taloja(Maharashtra), Renukoot, Mauda(Maharashtra)200,000 tpawire rodsRenukoot, Alupuram(Kerala)64,400 tpaaluminium foil Silvassa (Dadra & Nagar Haveli), Kalwa(Maharashtra)11,000 tpa aluminium wheelsSilvassa (Dadra & Nagar Haveli)300,000 pcs *For Taloja recycling plantIndal (subsidiary of Hindalco)foil rolling Kollur (Andhra Pradesh)4,000 tpa right0key products and brandslocationscapacitiescountryBirla Copper (Hindalco Industries Ltd.)copper cathodes Dahej (Gujarat)500,000 tpaIndiacontinuous cast copper rods 97,200 tpasulphuric acid 1,670,000 tpaphosphoric acid180,000 tpagold (Birla Gold) 15 mtsilver (Birla Silver) 150 mtDAP and complexes (Birla Balwan)400,000 tpaHindalco Industries Ltd. (Aditya Birla Minerals Resources Pty. Ltd.)copper cathodes Nifty mines 25,000 tpaAustraliacopper in concentrateMt. Gordon mines40,000 tpaAustraliapower Mt. Gordon mines28mwAustraliaright0key products and brandscapacitiescountryGrasim Industries Ltd.white cement Birla White475,000 tpaIndiagrey cementUltraTech Cement (formerly Birla Plus), Birla Super13.12 mn tpaUltraTech Cement Ltd. ordinary portland cement, portland blast furnace slag cement, portland pozzolana cement and grey portland cement17 mn tparight0key products and brandscapacitiescountryAditya Birla Nuvo Ltd (Hi-Tech Carbon)carbon blackBirla Carbon230,000 mtpaIndiaThai Carbon Black Co. Ltd. carbon blackBirla Carbon220,000 mtpaThailandAlexandria Carbon Co. S.A.E carbon blackBirla Carbon285,000 mtpaEgyptLiaoning Birla Carbon Co. Ltd. carbon blackBirla Carbon55,000 mtpa Chinaright0key products and brandscapacitiescountryPulpGrasim Industries Ltd. rayon grade pulp70,000 tpaIndiaAV Cell Inc. softwood / hardwood pulp122,500 tpaCanadaAV Nackawic Inc.dissolving pulp 189,000 tpa CanadaFibreGrasim Industries Ltd. viscose staple fibre (VSF)Birla Viscose270,100 tpaIndiaThai Rayon Public Company Ltd.VSFBirla Viscose110,000 tpaThailandPT Indo Bharat RayonVSFBirla Viscose155,000 tpaIndonesiaThai Acrylic Fibreacrylic fibreTexlan100,000 tpaThailandAlexandria Fiber Company, S.A.Eacrylic fibre 18,000 tpaEgyptYarnAditya Birla Nuvo Ltd. viscose filament yarnRay One16,400 tpaIndiaAditya Birla Nuvo Ltd. (Jaya Shree Textiles)flax yarns15,340 spindlesIndiaworsted yarns25,548 spindlesPT Indo Liberty Textilesrayon yarn, polyester, blended yarn 45,120 ring spindlesIndonesiaPT Elegant Textile Industryrayon, polyester, rayon-polyester blended spun yarn168,088 spindlesIndonesiaPT Sunrise Bumi Textilesviscose rayon, polyester viscose, spun polyester, polyster combed cotton, anti pill yarn, sewing thread, high twist yarn, reverse twist yarn, flame retardant yarn, rayon cotton blended yarn, micro denier polyester rayon yarn, rayon silk yarn, slub yarn, lycra core spun yarn89,376 spindlesIndonesiaIndo Phil Acrylic Manufacturing Corporationhigh bulk acrylic dyed yarn, non-bulk acrylic dyed yarn3,700 mtpaPhilippinesIndo Phil Textiles Mills Incpoly viscose blended yarn, poly cotton blended yarn, polyester yarn13,500 mtpaPhilippinesIndo Phil Cotton Mills Inccotton yarn10,000 mtpa PhilippinesIndo Thai Synthetics Co. Ltd. synthetic yarns98,568 spindlesThailandFabricsGrasim Industries Ltd. fabric - polyester, viscose, silk and wool blends146 loomsIndiaUncrushables, Ice Touch, Purista, and CleanFab18 million metresAditya Birla Nuvo Ltd. pure linen and linen blendsLinen Club107 loomsIndiaflame retardent fabricsPyroguardBranded apparelAditya Birla Nuvo Ltd. (Madura Garments) ready-to-wear garmentsLouis Philippe,Allen SollyVan Heusen, Peter EnglandIndiaright0key products and brandscapacitiescountryIndo Gulf ureaBirla Shaktiman864,600 mtIndiaBirla Copper (Hindalco Industries Ltd.) DAP/NPK complexesBirla Balwan400,000 tpaIndiaright0key products and brandscapacitiescountryGrasim Industries Ltd.caustic soda 258,000 tpaIndiaAditya Birla Nuvo Ltd.caustic soda 82,125 tpaIndialiquid chlorine50,340 tpahydrochloric acid5,475 tpaTanfac Industries Ltd.aluminium fluoride 17,000 tpaIndiahydrofluoric acid17,000 tpaBihar Caustic and Chemicals Ltd.caustic soda (100% NaOH)92,750 tpaIndialiquid chlorine56,000 tpahydrochloric acid (100%)43,750 tpa sodium hypochlorite (Cl2 weight)1,800 tpa compressed hydrogen17,42,400 nm3/a aluminium chloride12,000 tpastable bleaching powder17,500 tpaAditya Birla Chemicals (Thailand) Ltd.sodium triployphosphates,tetrasodium pyrophosphate,sodium hexametaphosphate,sodium acid pyrophosphate,monosodium phosphate,disodium phosphate,trisodium phosphate, speciality phosphatesepoxy resins (bis-a and bis-f), diluents, curing agents and allied productssodium sulphite, sodium metabisulphite,sodium bisulphite epichlorohydrin caustic soda chlorinePolyphos® EpotecBirlasulf-SS,Birlasulf-SM,Birlasol 35ThailandThai Peroxide Co. Ltd.hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, calcium peroxideEncare, Ecare, Aqua-x, Birlox 5, Birlox 12, Ocare15,000 mtpaThailandPT. Indo Raya Kimiacarbon disulfide50,000 tpaIndonesiaright0key products and brandscapacitiescountryEssel Mining & Industries Ltdiron and manganese ore15 million tonsIndiaright0key products and brandscapacitiescountryPan Century Surfactants Inc.fatty acids 55000 mtpaPhilippinesfatty alcohol30000 mtpaglycerin6500 mtpakey products and brandscapacitiescountryAditya Birla Insulatorsinsulators34,500 tpaIndiakey products and brandscapacitiescountryPSI Data Systems Ltd. (subsidiary of Aditya Birla Nuvo Ltd.)IT solutions (banking, finance and insurance)Indiaright0key products and brandscapacitiescountryAditya Birla Minacs Worldwide Limited (subsidiary of Aditya Birla Nuvo Ltd.)BPO / ITES9,089 seatsIndiakey products and brandscapacitiescountryBirla Global Finance Company Ltd.financial servicesIndiaBirla Sun Life Insurance Company Ltd.insurance solutions IndiaBirla Sun Life Asset Management Company Ltd.mutual fundsIndiaBirla Sun Life Distribution Company Ltd.investment planning servicesIndiaBirla Insurance Advisory Services Ltd.non-life insurance advisory servicesIndiaright0key products and brandscapacitiescountryIdea Cellular cellular services Idea21 million subscriber baseIndiakey products and brandscapacitiescountryAditya Birla Retail Limitedmulti-format stores170 retail outlets Indiaright0Aditya Birla Retail Limited  The Group's foray into the retail sector began in 2006, when the Aditya Birla Group acquired Trinethra, the south-India based chain of stores. Trinethra has over 170 outlets spread across Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala. May 2007 saw Aditya Birla Retail Ltd. launching their brand of stores more. While the supermarkets will have a minimum size of 10,000 sq.ft, the hypermarkets will be spread over an area of 75,000 sq.ft. The more. retail chain is positioned on a platform that promises consumers a refreshing shopping experience that gives them better quality, better value and more variety, combined with convenience and ease of shopping. more. promises a world class shopping experience to consumers, in their very own neighbourhood. Fulfilling everyday shopping needs for fruits, vegetables, grocery, frozen food, bakery, homecare, personal care and pharmacy. Offering branded FMCG products and house brands. Till date 100 supermarkets have been rolled out spanning Pune, Mumbai, Ahmedabad, Delhi, Vizag, Bangalore, Vijayawada and Chennai.[ Buying Categories ]  -  Computer and Electronics  >>  Audio  -  Computer and Electronics  >>  Video and Camera  -  Electrical and Lighting  >>  Fans and Air Conditioners  -  Home and Office  >>  Furniture Home appliance, Consumer Electronics, furniture Registration Date  2005/11/01 (Year/Month/Date)Buyer / Seller in EC21  BuyerBusiness Type  Buying OfficeYear established  1999Employees total  11 - 50Annual revenue  USD 5,000,001 - 10,000,000CompanyAditya Birla Retail LimitedAddressNo.1023 F10, Zhonghua Plaza, Huaihai Road, Shanghai Shanghai Shanghai 200020 ChinaPhone86 - 021 - 63915960Fax86 - 021 - 63915949Homepagewww.adityabirla.comContactEric Liu / Courcing Manager  Aditya Birla Retail (Press announcement) — To be among the leading players" Our mission is to change the way people shop. We will give them more." says Mr. Kumar Mangalam Birla Mr. Kumar Mangalam Birla, Chairman, Aditya Birla Group, today unveiled the brand name under which the Group's retail business will operate —" more." .Addressing the media in Mumbai, Mr. Birla said, " We believe that the Indian consumer today is underserved. Even though we have many shopping outlets in India, many of them do not offer the kind of shopping experiences that people in most other parts of the world are used to, and even take for granted. As a result, spends by Indian consumers on their day-to-day needs and special shopping occasions are much less than they ought to be." " Part of the reason for the underdevelopment of the Indian shopping environment is the lack of suitable infrastructure — whether it be the lack of economically viable real estate, a developed supply chain, the availability of trained manpower or backward linkages with suppliers. Our mission is to change the way people shop. We will give the Indian consumers a fundamentally better shopping experience. We will offer them more. than what they expect. Hence the brand — more." , averred Mr. Birla." We intend to be among the leading players in India," stated Mr. Birla. Elaborating on Aditya Birla Retail's strategy, he said that they would provide multi-shopping formats, a series of conveniently located neighbourhood supermarkets that would stock the daily and weekly household shopping needs and destination hypermarkets that cater to monthly and event-based shopping needs. The Group envisions having a national presence with both these formats in the not-so-distant future.Mr. Birla announced that the first supermarkets under the more. brand name would open shortly in Pune and then quickly expand to other major cities in India.Aditya Birla Retail intends to differentiate itself by providing very competitive prices and the right selection of products in a friendly and exciting environment. Over time, they will be developing their own products.To ensure the freshest supply of fruits and vegetables to customers, the company is building linkages directly with the farmers. They are also in the process of architecting a supply chain to connect households more directly to farmers and towards this invest appropriately in backend infrastructure.In January this year, the Group had acquired Trinethra Super Retail which has given them more than half a million square feet of selling area and a strong presence in the supermarket business in the four southern states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala, where it is the No.1 retailer. Plans to increase its penetration in the south and initiate a pan-India roll-out are on the anvil. Across all of Aditya Birla Retail's formats, the brand name will be common, i.e. more. The company does not intend having a joint venture partner given that the Aditya Birla Group has the necessary competencies inhouse. The investment in retail will not be out of any of the listed companies in the Aditya Birla Group, informed Mr. Birla.Mr. Sumant Sinha, the CEO of the retail business said, " more. is an aspirational brand for an aspirational country. We have a bright and committed, enthusiastic team that represents the best experience from India and globally. Already on board are Mr. Andrew Denby to head the supermarkets, and Mr. Russell Berman, for the hypermarkets. We are all very excited about our business" . <br />Research Methodology<br /><ul><li>Problem Definition: -
  2. 2. “Assessment of most selling staples & FMCG products in mop & pop stores close to ‘more’ retail outlets in Jaipur & designing an appropriate strategy for enhancing the category volume in ‘more’ retail outlets”
  3. 3. Purpose of Research:-</li></ul>To identify proper assortment mix of Aditya Birla’s ‘more’ retail outlets differencing in 3 catchments.<br />To design appropriate strategies for the above.<br />To identify most selling staples and FMCG products in mom and pop stores close to ‘more’ retail outlets.<br /><ul><li>Research Design: -</li></ul>Descriptive: -<br />To find out most selling staples and FMCG products in mom and pop stores close to ‘more’ retail outlets at Jaipur.<br /><ul><li>Sampling Design: -</li></ul>Population: - All mop and pop stores close to ‘more’ retail outlets at Jaipur.<br /><ul><li>Sampling Method: - Non-Probability</li></ul> “Convenience Sampling”<br />Sample Size: - 60 shops in city of Jaipur<br /> 2 stores of each catchment & 5 shops in each catchment.<br /><ul><li>DATA COLLECTION:-</li></ul>Instrument: Questionnaire<br />Method: -<br />Most of the primary data are collected through direct personal interview with the use of structured question.<br />Data analysis and findings<br />Data analysis and findings are the most important part of a research report, one can say the essence of a report. The whole research report depends on the fact how fairly and unbaisly the researcher has collected the data and analyzed them.<br />In this report the researcher haven’t used any personal questions to examine since this report is based on sellers so the demographics of the person selling goods won’t matter it would all depend on the location of the shop.<br />The data analysis and findings are based on location on basis of 3 catchment (A, B, C) and lastly showing an overall result taking all 3 catchment in consideration. Starting with A- catchment :<br />Category : RICE<br /> Fig 1.1 Loose/Packet fig 1.2 In packet which brand<br /> <br /><ul><li>In A-catchment area 67% of people purchase packed rice and only 33 % people purchase loose. This shows that in A-catchment area people mostly prefer branded items rather than purchasing loose.
  4. 4. In fig 1.2 it can be seen that 42% people in A-catchment purchase lalquila and 28% purchase india gate and rest daawat and doon resembles to 20% and 10% respectively.
  5. 5. This shows that people in A-catchment are not price sensitive, they are ready to pay the price if they get the quality.</li></ul>Category : AATA<br /> Fig 1.3 In packet which brand : Fig 1.4 Pack Size <br /><ul><li>I00% of shopkeepers sell packed aata , which again signifies that people of A-catchment prefer packet products over loose.
  6. 6. In fig 1.3 it can be seen that 60% of people purchase aashirwaad sarbati and 30% laxmibhog and rest 10% is for shakti bhog.
  7. 7. So, from the above findings the resercher can once again conclude that people of A-catchment are not price sensitive rather they are quality sensitive as aashirwaad sarbati is of high price as compared to other brands.
  8. 8. In fig 1.4 it can be seen that 70% of shopkeepers say that people here basically ask for 10 kg packet and only a few 30% ask for 5 kg packet
  9. 9. Category : DAL
  10. 10. Fig 1.5 type of Dal preferred
  11. 11. In fig 1.5 it can be seen that 50% people of A–catchment generally prefer having moong mogar and 30% prefer having moong chilka , a minor 15% prefer having moong dal nag rest 5% chana dal.In respect to packing 100% of shopkeepers say that generally people of that area ask of 1 kg.So the observation drawn from the above points are that people of A-catchment are very hygienic and purchase in very less quantity in perishable items as seen above. </li></ul>Category : GHEE Category : Edible Oil<br />Fig 1.6 Most preferred brand : Fig 1.7 Most Preferred brand :<br /> <br /><ul><li>All people of A-catchment purchase ghee and edible oil in packet which signifies that these people are very hygienic and prefer packet products.
  12. 12. In fig 1.6 it can be seen that saras and amul dominates this category with having a share of 40% each and rest 20% is shared by milkfood. So this again shows that people of A-catchment are not price sensitive as as both saras and amul market price is Rs180 and Rs200 respectively which is much higher then other ghee’s.
  13. 13. In fig 1.7 frotune oil covers maximum market share with 40% ands next to it are saffola and chamble with share of 30% each.
  14. 14. Category : Sampoo Fig 1.8 Catregory : Bathing soap fig 1.9</li></ul> <br /><ul><li>In fig 1.8 garnier covers 40%, head n shoulders 30 % , 20%clinic plus and rest by sunsilk.
  15. 15. In Fig 1.9 lux and dettol covers 40% each and lifebuy and pears 10% each.
  16. 16. So it can be concluded from above that people are very helth concious as 40% use dettol soap .</li></ul> Fig 1.10 Category : Washing soap Fig 1.11 Category : Washing Powder<br /> <br /><ul><li>In the above categories when shopkeepers were asked about pack sizes they just responded the normal pack size generally available in market.
  17. 17. In fig 1.10 rin and oswal having a share of 40% each and 20% is covered by wheel . So, it can be noted oswal shop shares 40% market which is a local brand .
  18. 18. In fig 1.11 rin , surf excel and tide share 30% each and rest 10 % is shared by ariel In this category people genrally go for branded products.</li></ul>Fig 1.12 Category : Namkins fig 1.13 Category : Talcum powder <br /> <br /><ul><li>In category namkins i.e. fig 1.13 bikaji covers 60% market, 20% is covered by haldiram and 10% by ajab. Now, ajab is a local brand which signifies that in this category people also have local brands i.e. they are not very brand loyal.
  19. 19. In fig 1.13 ponds share 40 %, 30% Is shared by axe and dermicool ,nycil nad boroplus share 10% each.
  20. 20. So it can be observed from above that few are very brand loyal while this category also have population which are not very brand conscious. </li></ul>B-catchment<br />Category : RICE<br /> Fig 1.1 Loose/Packet fig 1.2 In loose of what price<br /> <br /><ul><li>In B-catchment area 60% of people purchase loose rice and only 40% people purchase packet. This shows that in B-catchment area people mostly prefer loose items . Here people are both price sensitive and quality sensitive.
  21. 21. In fig 1.2 it can be seen that 40% people in B-catchment purchase rice priced between 31-35 and 30% purchase between 26-30 .
  22. 22. This shows that people in B-catchment are price sensitive, but in accordance with price they also lookfor quality.
  23. 23. Category : AATA</li></ul> Fig 1.3 In packet which brand : Fig 1.4 Pack Size <br /><ul><li>I00% of shopkeepers sell packed aata , which again signifies that people of B-catchment prefer packet products over loose.
  24. 24. In fig 1.3 it can be seen that 40% of people purchase laxmi bhoj and 30% aasirwad sarbati and 20% is for aamrit bhog and rest 10% sakti bhog.
  25. 25. So, from the above findings the resercher can once again conclude that people of B-catchment are price sensitive as 40% purchase laxmi bhog and they are also quality sensitive as aashirwaad sarbati is of high price as compared to other brands.
  26. 26. In fig 1.4 it can be seen that 70% of shopkeepers say that people here basically ask for 10 kg
  27. 27. Category : DAL
  28. 28. Fig 1.5 type of Dal preferred
  29. 29. In fig 1.5 it can be seen that 50% people of B–catchment generally prefer having moong mogar and 30% prefer having moong chilka , a minor 15% prefer having moong dal nag rest 5% chana dal.In respect to packing 100% of shopkeepers say that generally people of that area ask of 1 kg.So the observation drawn from the above points are that people of A-catchment are very hygienic and purchase in very less quantity in perishable items as seen above. </li></ul> Category : GHEE Category : Edible Oil<br />Fig 1.6 Most preferred brand : Fig 1.7 Most Preferred brand :<br /> <br /><ul><li>All people of B-catchment purchase ghee and edible oil in packet which signifies that these people are very hygienic and prefer packet products.
  30. 30. In fig 1.6 it can be seen that saras and milkfood dominates this category with having a share of 30% each and rest 40% is shared by milkfood. So this again shows that people of B-catchment aret price sensitive .
  31. 31. In fig 1.7 chambal oil covers maximum market share with 50% ands next to it is fortune and rest 10% is shared by saffola.
  32. 32. Category : Sampoo Fig 1.8 Catregory : Bathing soap fig 1.9</li></ul> <br /><ul><li>In fig 1.8 garnier covers 40%, head n shoulders 30 % , 20%clinic plus and rest by sunsilk.
  33. 33. In Fig 1.9 dettol covers 40% each and lifebuy around 30 %.
  34. 34. So it can be concluded from above that people are very helth concious as 40% use dettol soap .</li></ul> Fig 1.10 Category : Washing soap Fig 1.11 Category : Washing Powder<br /> <br /><ul><li>In the above categories when shopkeepers were asked about pack sizes they just responded the normal pack size generally available in market.
  35. 35. In fig 1.10 rin and oswal having a share of 40% each and 20% is covered by wheel . So, it can be noted oswal shop shares 40% market which is a local brand .
  36. 36. In fig 1.11 rin , surf excel and tide share 30% each and rest 10 % is shared by ariel In this category people genrally go for branded products.</li></ul>Fig 1.12 Category : Namkins fig 1.13 Category : Talcum powder <br /> <br /><ul><li>In category namkins i.e. fig 1.13 bikaji covers 60% market, 20% is covered by haldiram and 40% by ajab. Now, ajab is a local brand which signifies that in this category a mahor share is of ajab namkins .
  37. 37. In fig 1.13 ponds share 40 %, 30% Is shared by axe and dermicool ,nycil nad boroplus share 10% each.
  38. 38. So it can be observed from above that few are very brand loyal while this category also have population which are not very brand conscious. </li></ul>C-Catchment<br />Category : RICE<br /> Fig 1.1 Loose/Packet fig 1.2 In loose of what price<br /> <br /><ul><li>In C-catchment area 800% of people purchase loose rice and only 200% people purchase packet. This shows that in C-catchment area people mostly prefer loose items . Here people are mostly price sensitive.
  39. 39. In fig 1.2 it can be seen that 40% people in C-catchment purchase rice priced between 21-25 and 30% purchase between 15-20 .
  40. 40. This shows that people in C-catchment are very price sensitive, the main factor for purchasing any product from any place is price.
  41. 41. Category : AATA</li></ul> Fig 1.3 In packet which brand : Fig 1.4 Pack Size <br /><ul><li>I00% of shopkeepers sell packed aata , which again signifies that people of C-catchment prefer packet products over loose.
  42. 42. In fig 1.3 it can be seen that 40% of people purchase laxmi bhoj and 30% sakti bhog and 20% is for aamrit bhog and rest 10% aashirwaad sarbati.
  43. 43. So, from the above findings the resercher can once again conclude that people of C-catchment are price sensitive as 90% of sale comprises from laxmi bhog,sakti bhog and aamrit and all three comes under ame price range.
  44. 44. In fig 1.4 it can be seen that 70% of shopkeepers say that people here basically ask for 10 kg
  45. 45. Category : DAL
  46. 46. In fig 1.5 it can be seen that 50% people of B–catchment generally prefer having moong mogar and 30% prefer having moong chilka , a minor 15% prefer having moong dal nag rest 5% chana dal.In respect to packing 100% of shopkeepers say that generally people of that area ask of 1 kg.So the observation drawn from the above points are that people of A-catchment are very hygienic and purchase in very less quantity in perishable items as seen above. </li></ul> Category : GHEE Category : Edible Oil<br />Fig 1.6 Most preferred brand : Fig 1.7 Most Preferred brand :<br /> <br /><ul><li>All people of B-catchment purchase edible oil in packet and in respect of ghee 30% population purchase loose.
  47. 47. In fig 1.6 it can be seen that branded ones account to 70% of sale , while 30% purchase it loose.so it can be said that people of C-catchment want low ost gfhee or they cant afford in large quantity.
  48. 48. In fig 1.7 chambal oil covers maximum market share with 50% ands next to it is fortune and rest 10% is shared by engine.
  49. 49. Category : Sampoo Fig 1.8 Catregory : Bathing soap fig 1.9</li></ul> <br /><ul><li>In fig 1.8 chik covers 20%, head n shoulders 30 % , 30% clinic plus and rest by sunsilk.
  50. 50. In Fig 1.9 all soaps share equally 20% each.
  51. 51. So it can be concluded from above that people are very helth concious as 40% use dettol soap .</li></ul> Fig 1.10 Category : Washing soap Fig 1.11 Category : Washing Powder<br /> <br /><ul><li>In the above categories when shopkeepers were asked about pack sizes they just responded the normal pack size generally available in market.
  52. 52. In fig 1.10 rin and oswal having a share of 40% each and 20% is covered by wheel . So, it can be noted oswal shop shares 40% market which is a local brand .
  53. 53. In fig 1.11 rin , rin and tide share 30% each and rest 40 % is shared by others. In this category people of C-catchment genrally go for non-branded products.</li></ul>Fig 1.12 Category : Namkins fig 1.13 Category : Talcum powder <br /> <br /><ul><li>In category namkins i.e. fig 1.13 others covers 60% market, 10% is covered by haldiram and 20% by ajab. Now, a major 60% is shared by local brands .
  54. 54. In fig 1.13 ponds share 40 %, 30% Is shared by axe and dermicool ,nycil nad boroplus share 10% each.
  55. 55. So it can be observed from above that few are very brand loyal while this category also have population which are not very brand conscious. </li></ul>Recommendations<br /><ul><li>Aditya Birla Retail Ltd’s ‘more’ should set their assortment mix differentiating in
  56. 56. 3 catchments (A,B,C)
  57. 57. ‘More’ retail outlets should revise their MBQ’s ( Maximum Bin Quantity)
  58. 58. For A-catchment it should emphasize on quality and for perishable products it should set less MBQ’S.
  59. 59. Range is also important for A-catchment area as people here are very brand loyal and if they don’t get their brand it becomes a loss of potential customer.
  60. 60. For perishable products it should set MBQ very less and try and keep fresh items , especially for A-catchment.
  61. 61. Customer of A-catchment is not price sensitive.
  62. 62. For B-catchment customers it should emphasize both on price and quality.
  63. 63. It should keep loose rice if different varieties and price so that customer gets choice in loose products also.
  64. 64. It should appropriately design various promotional schemes for B-catchment customers so as to increase footfall.
  65. 65. C-catchment customers are very price sensitive, so it should try and keep the prices there as low as possible.
  66. 66. In C-catchment it should keep products very less in quantity as their purchasing power is very less.
  67. 67. It should packet various items in less quantity like 100gms,200 gms,250 gms so that customer get a choice, as C-catchment customers purchase very less quantity at a time.
  68. 68. It should negotiate a deal with oswal soaps as it is sold in all 3- catchments and also captures huge market share in washing soap category.
  69. 69. It should also make a deal with other local dealers in respect to namkins , washing powder, as people of C-catchment generally prefer low priced good.
  70. 70. Few products like Frotune oil, chamble oil,milkfood ghee,oswal soaps,dettol shop etc. which are having almost equal demands in all catchments ,their MBQ should be kept high and should take care of never running short of these products.</li></ul> <br /><ul><li> </li></ul>Limitations<br />The sample size taken for our survey is small and hence the conclusions drawn from this may not apply to the entire population.<br />Response Error: It is of two types:<br />Inability error: Many a times it so happens that the respondents are not fully aware. In such cases it was difficult for them to fill up the questionnaire.<br />Unwillingness Error: Respondents were deterrent to provide information because of lack of time and no incentive for them.<br />Conclusion<br />At the end of the research work the researcher can conclude that for the success of any retail outlet a proper assortment mix is extremely important. Today in this competitive environment especially in retail sector where every day a new company is being established we can only say ‘survival of the fittest’ and to survive here every organization must keep a check on every thing happening in and around.<br />So, to survive the competition every organization have to design different strategy for different areas based on its demographics and this research work is also based on proper assortment mix in different catchments of Aditya birla’s ‘more’ retail outlets. After the research it can be concluded that their needs to be difference in type , range, variety ,price in different areas.<br />The overall analysis can be derived in 3 points :<br /><ul><li> A-catchment people are not price sensitive, they prefer quality on price and moreover they also need variety as they are brand loyal customers.
  71. 71. B-catchment customers are both price and quality sensitive these people are not very brand loyal can change their brand preference but maintains a level of quality.
  72. 72. C-catchment customers are only price sensitive and they prefer product which is of lower price whether it be of private level or branded. </li></ul>Lastly the researcher hopes that the above research will help the organization and also make a difference to it.<br />Questionniare<br />Dear Seller , we are conducting an survey on type of grocery item mostly sold at your shop so that we can appropriately design policies on those items. So I request you give your 10 min to fill this questionnaire.<br /><ul><li>Name of person / Shop ………………………………………………………………………..
  73. 73. Location …………………………………………………………………………………………………
  74. 74. Rank appropriately as per Consumption/Sales ( please rank at least two )
  75. 75. a)
  76. 76. RiceTick LooseCategory Price PacketRank Pack SizeRankLooseBasmati 15-20Lal quila500 gmspacketDubar 21-25India gate1 kgTibar 26-30Doon2 kgParimal 31-35Kohinooor5 kgSella 36-40Charminar10 kgKinki 41-45Daawat</li></ul>b<br /><ul><li>AataRankIf packet then which,Pack sizeRankPacketAashirwad1 kglooseAashirwaad Sarbati2 kgLaxmi Bhog5 kgShakti bhog10 kgAamritOthers………………..</li></ul>c)<br /><ul><li>DalTickIf loose then which,Rank QuantityRankSampooPouch RankBottle RankPacketChana dal500 gmsSunsilkLooseMoong dal1 kgHead n shouldersTur/arhar dal2 kgDoveMoong Chilka5 kgClinic all clearOther……GarnierChikPantene
  77. 77. Bibliography
  78. 78. d)
  79. 79. GheeTickIf Packet then which,Rank QuantityRankOilTickIf Packet then which,Rank QuantityRankPacketSaras500 gmsPacketSaffola500 mlLooseAmul1 kgLooseFortune1 ltrMilk food2 kgNature fresh2 ltrMother Dairy5 kg Chambal5 ltrKrishnaSundrop15 ltrMahaanDharaOther…Engine</li></ul>e.<br />Bathing soapRankWashing soapRankWashing PowderRankPack SizeRankLuxRinRinLirilWheelSurfexcelDettolTide ArielLifeboyOswalTideDoveBandar chapWheelCintholGharahiGhareePearsSunflowerNirma GodrejOtherOther..Others..<br /> f.<br />JuicesRankNamkinsRankPack sizeRankTalcum powderRankRealBikajaAXEFreshHaldiram PondsKisaanParsumalFaRasnaVardamanNevieaOtherOther.LirilDermicool Nycil<br />

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