LH 23 | Lawyering, Inc., 1980-2000

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LH 23 | Lawyering, Inc., 1980-2000

  1. 1. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />
  2. 2. Lawyering Inc., 1980-2000<br />
  3. 3. Right turn<br />
  4. 4. Deregulation<br />
  5. 5. Corporations surge<br />
  6. 6. End of the Cold War<br />
  7. 7. Technology booms<br />
  8. 8. Problems at home<br />
  9. 9. The S&L crisis<br />
  10. 10. Growing wealth disparity<br />
  11. 11. A million lawyers!<br />
  12. 12. More and more law students<br />
  13. 13. More and more law students<br />
  14. 14. More and more law students<br />
  15. 15. More and more law students<br />
  16. 16. Not only does the law absorb many more young people in America than in any other industrialized nation: it attracts an unusually large proportion of the exceptionally gifted…The net result [of this trend] is a massive diversion of exceptional talent into pursuits that often add little to the growth of the economy, the pursuit of culture, or the enhancement of the human spirit. <br />- Derek Bok, President, Harvard University, 1981<br />Too many law students?<br />
  17. 17. Lots more women<br />
  18. 18. Lots more women<br />
  19. 19. A few more minorities<br />
  20. 20. Birth of the megafirms<br />
  21. 21. Firm sizes<br />
  22. 22. Firm sizes<br />
  23. 23. Nationalization<br />
  24. 24. Globalization<br />
  25. 25. Law with the lid off<br />
  26. 26. Lawyer advertising<br />
  27. 27. Legal media<br />
  28. 28. Steven Brill<br />
  29. 29. Print publications<br />
  30. 30. Print publications<br />
  31. 31. Lawyers on cable<br />
  32. 32. Competition and firm culture<br />
  33. 33. Billable hours distress<br />
  34. 34. Partners on the loose<br />
  35. 35. Merger mania<br />
  36. 36. Collapse of the middle<br />
  37. 37. Collapse of the middle<br />
  38. 38. Collapse of the middle<br />
  39. 39. Boutique firms<br />
  40. 40. In-house counsel<br />
  41. 41. Practice shifts<br />
  42. 42. Specializations<br />
  43. 43.
  44. 44. Firm vulnerabilities<br />
  45. 45. Ethical vulnerabilities<br />
  46. 46. Economic vulnerabilities<br />
  47. 47. Lawyer layoffs<br />
  48. 48. Firm failures<br />
  49. 49. Finley, Kumble<br />
  50. 50. Lord, Day & Lord<br />
  51. 51. Lawyers for the public<br />
  52. 52. Cutbacks to legal aid<br />
  53. 53. LSC eviscerated<br />
  54. 54. Lawyers and mass torts<br />
  55. 55. New organizational forms<br />
  56. 56. Lawyers in popular culture<br />
  57. 57. TV lawyers<br />
  58. 58. TV lawyers<br />
  59. 59. Lawyers in the movies<br />
  60. 60. Lawyers in the movies<br />
  61. 61. Lawyer jokes<br />
  62. 62. The professionalism crisis<br />
  63. 63. The professionalism crisis<br />
  64. 64. Ethics again<br />
  65. 65. Model Rules of Professional Conduct, 1983<br />
  66. 66. MPRE, 1980<br />
  67. 67. Meanwhile, in law school…<br />
  68. 68. The commodification of legal education<br />
  69. 69. Clinics universalized<br />
  70. 70. …but under attack<br />
  71. 71. …but under attack<br />
  72. 72. Pro bono requirements<br />
  73. 73. More emphasis on skills training<br />
  74. 74. The fall of CLS<br />
  75. 75. Critical offshoots<br />
  76. 76. Diversity concerns<br />
  77. 77. Law and economics<br />
  78. 78. John Olin<br />
  79. 79. New types of law schools<br />
  80. 80. New types of law schools<br />
  81. 81. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />

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