Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />
Lawyering in the Gilded Age<br />
Part II: Disciplining the Bar<br />
Standards<br />
Bar associations<br />
War and organization<br />
Guarding the Constitution<br />
Politics and the elite bar<br />
Elihu Root<br />
	The real duty proposed is one of state politics and the real burden to be assumed is the infinite multitude and mass of p...
Other professional associations<br />
Business combinations<br />
Defensive factors<br />
The “best men of the bar”<br />
Association of the Bar of the City of New York<br />
Simeon Baldwin<br />
The Tweed Ring<br />
	Many say...[the] glory and the dignity [of the Bar] are gone, that it has ceased to be a noble profession and is merely a...
American Bar Association<br />
Saratoga Springs, 1878<br />
Impact of the bar associations<br />
Social clubs<br />
The first legal ethics code<br />
Hoffman and Sharswood<br />
David Dudley Field<br />
Thomas Goode Jones<br />
A conservative code<br />
Bar admission<br />
Written bar exams<br />
Legal education<br />
Harvard Law<br />
Michigan Law<br />
Christopher Columbus Langdell<br />
Harvard changes<br />
The case method<br />
Casebooks<br />
	[Law] considered as a science, consists of certain principles or doctrines. To have such a mastery of these as to be able...
	[A] college degree or an examination including Latin…will keep out the little scrubs (German Jew boys mostly) whom the Sc...
James Ames<br />
Harvard Law Review, 1887<br />
Association of American Law Schools, 1900<br />
Pittsburgh: the steel bar<br />
Growth<br />
Pittsburgh industrialists<br />
Wealth<br />
Conflict<br />
Pittsburgh lawyers<br />
John Henry Hampton<br />
George Shiras, Jr.<br />
George Shiras, Jr.<br />
Philander Knox<br />
James Reed<br />
Knox & Reed<br />
Reed Smith<br />
Willis McCook<br />
Willis McCook<br />
William Brennen<br />
Lawyering downtown<br />
A new courthouse<br />
Community<br />
Distinction<br />
Power<br />
Meanwhile, at Harvard…<br />
Meanwhile, at Harvard…<br />
And a law school at last!<br />
Why was the postbellum American bar worried about ethics?<br />Why did bar associations suddenly make a comeback into the ...
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LH 17 | Disciplining the Bar

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Transcript of "LH 17 | Disciplining the Bar"

  1. 1. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />
  2. 2. Lawyering in the Gilded Age<br />
  3. 3. Part II: Disciplining the Bar<br />
  4. 4. Standards<br />
  5. 5. Bar associations<br />
  6. 6. War and organization<br />
  7. 7. Guarding the Constitution<br />
  8. 8. Politics and the elite bar<br />
  9. 9. Elihu Root<br />
  10. 10. The real duty proposed is one of state politics and the real burden to be assumed is the infinite multitude and mass of political details…I contemplate this with perfect loathing and disgust...It would mean the permanent abandonment of my profession and my position at the Bar, the breaking up of my home to myself and my family, an exile for four years from the associations which make life worth living, and in exchange the complete surrender and devotion of my life to sordid details of local politics...<br /> - Elihu Root, 1904<br />
  11. 11. Other professional associations<br />
  12. 12. Business combinations<br />
  13. 13. Defensive factors<br />
  14. 14. The “best men of the bar”<br />
  15. 15. Association of the Bar of the City of New York<br />
  16. 16. Simeon Baldwin<br />
  17. 17. The Tweed Ring<br />
  18. 18. Many say...[the] glory and the dignity [of the Bar] are gone, that it has ceased to be a noble profession and is merely a trade with the rest. We do not admit this charge. But we mean to come together as a body, to look the question fairly in the face, and if we find that we have been tainted by the influence of the times, to undertake ourselves the work of purification, to revive a past renown, and give new life to traditions which we believe to be dormant, not extinct.<br /> - ABCNY organizing letter, 1870<br />
  19. 19. American Bar Association<br />
  20. 20. Saratoga Springs, 1878<br />
  21. 21. Impact of the bar associations<br />
  22. 22. Social clubs<br />
  23. 23. The first legal ethics code<br />
  24. 24. Hoffman and Sharswood<br />
  25. 25. David Dudley Field<br />
  26. 26.
  27. 27. Thomas Goode Jones<br />
  28. 28.
  29. 29. A conservative code<br />
  30. 30. Bar admission<br />
  31. 31. Written bar exams<br />
  32. 32. Legal education<br />
  33. 33. Harvard Law<br />
  34. 34. Michigan Law<br />
  35. 35.
  36. 36. Christopher Columbus Langdell<br />
  37. 37. Harvard changes<br />
  38. 38. The case method<br />
  39. 39. Casebooks<br />
  40. 40. [Law] considered as a science, consists of certain principles or doctrines. To have such a mastery of these as to be able to apply them with constant facility and certainty to the ever-tangled skein of human affairs, is what constitutes a true lawyer; and hence to acquire that mastery should be the business of every earnest student of law. Each of these doctrines has arrived at its present state by slow degrees; in other words, it is a growth, extending in many cases through centuries. This growth is to be traced through a series of cases; and much the shortest and best, if not the only way of mastering the doctrine effectually is by studying the cases in which it is embodied.<br />Langdell’s approach<br />
  41. 41. [A] college degree or an examination including Latin…will keep out the little scrubs (German Jew boys mostly) whom the School now promotes from the grocery-counters...to be "Gentlemen of the Bar". <br /> - George Templeton Strong, 1874<br />Narrowing the bar<br />
  42. 42. James Ames<br />
  43. 43. Harvard Law Review, 1887<br />
  44. 44. Association of American Law Schools, 1900<br />
  45. 45. Pittsburgh: the steel bar<br />
  46. 46. Growth<br />
  47. 47. Pittsburgh industrialists<br />
  48. 48. Wealth<br />
  49. 49. Conflict<br />
  50. 50. Pittsburgh lawyers<br />
  51. 51. John Henry Hampton<br />
  52. 52. George Shiras, Jr.<br />
  53. 53. George Shiras, Jr.<br />
  54. 54. Philander Knox<br />
  55. 55. James Reed<br />
  56. 56. Knox & Reed<br />
  57. 57. Reed Smith<br />
  58. 58. Willis McCook<br />
  59. 59. Willis McCook<br />
  60. 60. William Brennen<br />
  61. 61. Lawyering downtown<br />
  62. 62. A new courthouse<br />
  63. 63. Community<br />
  64. 64. Distinction<br />
  65. 65. Power<br />
  66. 66.
  67. 67. Meanwhile, at Harvard…<br />
  68. 68. Meanwhile, at Harvard…<br />
  69. 69. And a law school at last!<br />
  70. 70.
  71. 71.
  72. 72.
  73. 73.
  74. 74.
  75. 75.
  76. 76.
  77. 77.
  78. 78.
  79. 79. Why was the postbellum American bar worried about ethics?<br />Why did bar associations suddenly make a comeback into the years after 1870?<br />How did Christopher Columbus Langdell change American legal education ?<br />How did the changing architecture of the Pittsburgh courthouse(s) reflect – and prompt - different ways of thinking about law?<br />Review questions<br />
  80. 80. Lawyering in the Gilded Age<br />
  81. 81. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />

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