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LH 12 | Lawyering in a New Nation
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LH 12 | Lawyering in a New Nation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Professor Bernard Hibbitts
    University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010
    Lawyering: A History
  • 2. Lawyeringin a New Nation
  • 3. Colonial lawyers at Noon
  • 4. An English bar?
  • 5. Important differences
  • 6. Chasing fees
  • 7. The Regulators
  • 8. Lawyers in politics
  • 9. Lawyers and patronage
  • 10. The legal rhetoric of revolution
  • 11. The legal rhetoric of revolution
  • 12.
  • 13. Stamp Act, 1765
  • 14. Stamp Act repealed
  • 15. The “moderate men”
  • 16. Triumph and disaster
  • 17. The first American civil war
  • 18. The Randolphs of Virginia
  • 19. The effects of revolution
  • 20. The bar divided
  • 21. Loyalist lawyers forced out
  • 22. Jonathan Sewall left for England; resettled in New Brunswick
    Timothy Ruggles evacuated to Nova Scotia
    Benjamin Kent evacuated to Nova Scotia
    Samuel Fitch evacuated to Nova Scotia, then left for England
    Jeremiah Rogers evacuated to Nova Scotia
    Benjamin Gridley evacuated to Nova Scotia, then left for England
    Samuel Quincy left for England, resettled in Antigua
    Andrew Cazeneau left for England, resettled in Bermuda (returned Boston 1788)
    Samuel Sewall left for England
    Abel Willard evacuated to Nova Scotia, resettled in New Brunswick
    James Putnam evacuated to Nova Scotia, resettled in New Brunswick
    Samuel Porter left for England
    Daniel Leonhard evacuated to Nova Scotia, then left for England
    Pelham Winslow evacuated to Nova Scotia (returned New York; d. 1783)
    Jonathan Adams no record
    Sampson Salter Blowers (junior to John Adams in the Boston Massacre Trial) evacuated to Nova Scotia
    Rufus Chandler evacuated to Nova Scotia, then left for England
    Massachusetts loyalist lawyers
  • 23. Joseph Galloway left for England
    Andrew Allen evacuated to New York, then left for England
    Issac Hunt imprisoned; escaped to Barbados, then left for England
    Christian Huck enlisted in a Loyalist regiment; killed in action, 1780
    Charles Stedman enlisted in a Loyalist regiment; resettled in England
    Miers Fisher expelled to Virginia; returned
    Edward Shippen stayed
    Pennsylvania loyalist lawyers
  • 24. Loyalist lawyers in England
  • 25. Loyalist lawyers in England
  • 26. Loyalist lawyers in Canada
  • 27. American law exported
  • 28. Reconciliation and reintegration
  • 29. Lawyers for a new nation
  • 30. Lawyers and the Constitution
  • 31. New courts
  • 32. The first Supreme Court
  • 33. The first Supreme Court
  • 34. New precedents
  • 35. Lawyers assailed
  • 36. Shay’s Rebellion, 1786
  • 37. Whiskey Rebellion
  • 38. Pittsburgh: lawyering on the frontier
  • 39. Pittsburgh, 1787
  • 40. Pittsburg is inhabited almost entirely by Scotch and Irish who live in log houses and are as dirty as in the north of Ireland or even in Scotland. There is a great deal of small trade carried on...There are in town four attorneys, two doctors and not a priest of any persuasion, nor church or chapel, so they are likely to be damned without the benefit of clergy....The place I believe will never be very considerable.
    - Arthur Lee, 1784
  • 41. Hugh Henry Brackenridge
  • 42. John Woods
  • 43. John Woods
  • 44. John Woods
  • 45. James Ross
  • 46. The Pittsburgh courthouse, 1800
  • 47. Pittsburgh’s legal district
  • 48. How did colonial lawyering differ from English lawyering in the run-up to Revolution?
    How did American colonial lawyers draw on the previous experience of lawyers in England in arguing for political change?
    Was the Revolution really the undoing of the colonial bar, or the making of it?
    What circumstances motivated anti-lawyer sentiment before and after the Revolution?
    How did early lawyering in Pittsburgh reflect broader national trends? What was different about it?
    Review questions
  • 49. Tomorrow… Making American Lawyers!
  • 50. Lawyeringin a New Nation
  • 51. Professor Bernard Hibbitts
    University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010
    Lawyering: A History