LH 12 | Lawyering in a New Nation

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LH 12 | Lawyering in a New Nation

  1. 1. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />
  2. 2. Lawyeringin a New Nation<br />
  3. 3. Colonial lawyers at Noon<br />
  4. 4. An English bar?<br />
  5. 5. Important differences<br />
  6. 6. Chasing fees<br />
  7. 7. The Regulators<br />
  8. 8. Lawyers in politics<br />
  9. 9. Lawyers and patronage<br />
  10. 10. The legal rhetoric of revolution<br />
  11. 11. The legal rhetoric of revolution<br />
  12. 12.
  13. 13. Stamp Act, 1765<br />
  14. 14. Stamp Act repealed<br />
  15. 15. The “moderate men”<br />
  16. 16. Triumph and disaster<br />
  17. 17. The first American civil war<br />
  18. 18. The Randolphs of Virginia<br />
  19. 19. The effects of revolution<br />
  20. 20. The bar divided <br />
  21. 21. Loyalist lawyers forced out<br />
  22. 22. Jonathan Sewall left for England; resettled in New Brunswick<br />Timothy Ruggles evacuated to Nova Scotia<br />Benjamin Kent evacuated to Nova Scotia<br />Samuel Fitch evacuated to Nova Scotia, then left for England<br />Jeremiah Rogers evacuated to Nova Scotia<br />Benjamin Gridley evacuated to Nova Scotia, then left for England<br />Samuel Quincy left for England, resettled in Antigua<br />Andrew Cazeneau left for England, resettled in Bermuda (returned Boston 1788)<br />Samuel Sewall left for England<br />Abel Willard evacuated to Nova Scotia, resettled in New Brunswick<br />James Putnam evacuated to Nova Scotia, resettled in New Brunswick<br />Samuel Porter left for England<br />Daniel Leonhard evacuated to Nova Scotia, then left for England<br />Pelham Winslow evacuated to Nova Scotia (returned New York; d. 1783)<br />Jonathan Adams no record<br />Sampson Salter Blowers (junior to John Adams in the Boston Massacre Trial) evacuated to Nova Scotia<br />Rufus Chandler evacuated to Nova Scotia, then left for England<br />Massachusetts loyalist lawyers<br />
  23. 23. Joseph Galloway left for England<br />Andrew Allen evacuated to New York, then left for England<br />Issac Hunt imprisoned; escaped to Barbados, then left for England<br />Christian Huck enlisted in a Loyalist regiment; killed in action, 1780<br />Charles Stedman enlisted in a Loyalist regiment; resettled in England<br />Miers Fisher expelled to Virginia; returned<br />Edward Shippen stayed<br />Pennsylvania loyalist lawyers<br />
  24. 24. Loyalist lawyers in England<br />
  25. 25. Loyalist lawyers in England<br />
  26. 26. Loyalist lawyers in Canada<br />
  27. 27. American law exported<br />
  28. 28. Reconciliation and reintegration<br />
  29. 29. Lawyers for a new nation<br />
  30. 30. Lawyers and the Constitution<br />
  31. 31. New courts<br />
  32. 32. The first Supreme Court<br />
  33. 33. The first Supreme Court<br />
  34. 34. New precedents<br />
  35. 35. Lawyers assailed<br />
  36. 36. Shay’s Rebellion, 1786<br />
  37. 37. Whiskey Rebellion<br />
  38. 38. Pittsburgh: lawyering on the frontier<br />
  39. 39. Pittsburgh, 1787<br />
  40. 40. Pittsburg is inhabited almost entirely by Scotch and Irish who live in log houses and are as dirty as in the north of Ireland or even in Scotland. There is a great deal of small trade carried on...There are in town four attorneys, two doctors and not a priest of any persuasion, nor church or chapel, so they are likely to be damned without the benefit of clergy....The place I believe will never be very considerable.<br /> - Arthur Lee, 1784<br />
  41. 41. Hugh Henry Brackenridge<br />
  42. 42. John Woods<br />
  43. 43. John Woods<br />
  44. 44. John Woods<br />
  45. 45. James Ross<br />
  46. 46. The Pittsburgh courthouse, 1800<br />
  47. 47. Pittsburgh’s legal district<br />
  48. 48. How did colonial lawyering differ from English lawyering in the run-up to Revolution?<br />How did American colonial lawyers draw on the previous experience of lawyers in England in arguing for political change?<br />Was the Revolution really the undoing of the colonial bar, or the making of it?<br />What circumstances motivated anti-lawyer sentiment before and after the Revolution?<br />How did early lawyering in Pittsburgh reflect broader national trends? What was different about it?<br />Review questions<br />
  49. 49. Tomorrow… Making American Lawyers!<br />
  50. 50. Lawyeringin a New Nation<br />
  51. 51. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />

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