English advanced 2011 trial prep

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  • 1. English Advanced 2011
    Continuing the hard yards towards the HSC …
  • 2. TRIAL H.S.C. 2009
    • Paper 1 – AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    • 3. Section 1: Reading Section
    • 4. Section 2: Imaginative Response
    • 5. Section 3: Synthesis Response
    • 6. Paper 2 – Modules
    • 7. Module A: Comparative Study of Text and Context– Exploring Connections: King Richard III & Looking for Richard
    • 8. Module B: Critical Study of Text – George Orwell, Essays
  • AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    Area of Study
     
    An Area of Study is the exploration of a concept that affects our perceptions of ourselves and our world. Students explore, analyse, question and articulate the ways in which perceptions of this concept are shaped in and through a variety of texts.
     
    In the Area of Study, students explore and examine relationships between language and text, and interrelationships among texts. They examine closely the individual qualities of texts while considering the texts’ relationships to the wider context of the Area of Study. They synthesise ideas to clarify meaning and develop new meanings. They take into account whether aspects such as context, purpose and register, text structure, stylistic features, grammatical features and vocabulary are appropriate to the particular text.
     
    In addition, students will explore texts of their own choosing relevant to the Area of Study. Students draw their chosen texts from a variety of sources, in a range of genres and media.
  • 9. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    This Area of Study requires students to explore the ways in which the concept of belonging is represented in and through texts.
     
    Perceptions and ideas of belonging, or of not belonging, vary. These perceptions are shaped within personal, cultural, historical and social contexts. A sense of belonging can emerge from the connections made with people, places, groups, communities and the larger world. Within this Area of Study, students may consider aspects of belonging in terms of experiences and notions of identity, relationships, acceptance and understanding.
  • 10. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    Texts explore many aspects of belonging, including the potential of the individual to enrich or challenge a community or group. They may reflect the way attitudes to belonging are modified over time. Texts may also represent choices not to belong, or barriers which prevent belonging.
    Perceptions and ideas of belonging in texts can be constructed through a variety of language modes, forms, features and structures. In engaging with the text, a responder may experience and understand the possibilities presented by a sense of belonging to, or exclusion fromthe text and the world it represents. This engagement may be influenced by the different ways perspectives are given voice in or are absent from a text.
     
  • 11. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    In their responses and compositions students examine, question, and reflect and speculate on:
    how the concept of belonging is conveyed through the representations of people, relationships, ideas, places, events, and societies that they encounter in the prescribed text and texts of their own choosing related to the Area of Study
    assumptions underlying various representations of the concept of belonging
    how the composer’s choice of language modes, forms, features and structures shapes and is shaped by a sense of belonging
    their own experiences of belonging, in a variety of contexts
    the ways in which they perceive the world through texts
    the ways in which exploring the concept and significance of belonging may broaden and deepen their understanding of themselves and their world
     
    NOTE: THIS MEANS YOUR PERSONAL RESPONSE IS IMPORTANT!!
  • 12. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    Section I(15 marks)
    There will be ONE section based on unseen texts related to the Area of Study.
    This question will consist of a number of short response parts.
    Section I - RUBRIC
    In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
    demonstrate understanding of the way perceptions of belonging are shaped in and through texts
    describe, explain and analyse the relationship between language, text and context.
     
  • 13. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    PART I – Section I
     
    If asked to considerAudience, think about:
    Age
    Sex
    Education
    Interests
    Background
     
    If asked to considerPurpose think about:
    Persuade? Inform? Entertain? Review?
    Express Feelings? Narrate? Share an opinion?
    Arouse Emotion? Express P.O.V?
     
    If asked to consider Tone think about:
    Attitudes to self, audience, context?
    Sincere? Serious? Critical? Positive/negative? Neutral? Cynical? Authoritative?
    If asked to consider Structure think about:
    Words, Sentences, Paragraphs, Overall Frame…
    Short, long, exhaustive, extended, littered with commas, cyclic, concise.
    Beginning, Middle, End? Climax? Anti-climax? Coda?
  • 14. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    1. When you first look at a text you should make notes on:
    FORM
    PURPOSE
    AUDIENCE
    CONTEXT
    2. You should decide what aspect of belonging is being presented (see Syllabus outline for this)
    3. You should decide how the composer has reflected these aspects of belonging through their chosen form
  • 15. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    IF IT’S A WRITTEN TEXT, CONSIDER:
    Strong Action Verbs?
    Metaphor, Simile, Personification???
    Colloquialisms?  imply relaxed view of journey
    Connotations…positive? negative?
    Use of; Rhetorical Q’s?
    Parody? Pun?
    Formal/Colloquial/Slang?
    Sophisticated vocab? Use of Humour? Emotive?
    Description? Jargon? Cliché? Irony? Euphemism?
    Subjective/Objective language?
     
    IF IT’S A VISUAL TEXT, CONSIDER:
    Composition, Framing, Colour, Symbolism, Modality, Vectors,
    Tone, Clarity?
  • 16. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    HSC MARKERS’ DOs AND DON’Ts – AREA OF STUDY: SECTION I
     
    DO:
    use direct quotations or paraphrases where appropriate in your responses
    analyse a text rather than simply explain or describe it
    choose appropriate textual references to support your ideas
    include a conceptual as well as technique-based discussion
     
    DON’T:
     
    Write a longer response than necessary, brief responses are required for one and two mark questions.
    Use limited textual support
    Quote large portions of the text without explanation
    Simply describe the content of the texts
    Describe generalised aspects of belonging with limited textual references
  • 17. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    Section II(15 marks)
    There will be ONE question.
    Candidates will be required to compose or adapt a text for a specified context, purpose and audience.
    Section II - RUBRIC
    In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
    express understanding of belonging in the context of your studies
    organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose and context.
  • 18. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    Here are some suggestions that might be helpful if writing a narrative:
    • strong sense of voice, if writing in first person
    • clear characterisation suggesting who is affected/involved in the belonging/not belonging
    • barrier(s) to the belonging encountered on the way
    • clear evocation of place through descriptive language
    • sensory detail
    • metaphorical language linked to chosen aspects of belonging
    • clear conceptual reflection on certain aspects of belonging
    • framing devices linking beginning and end
  • 19. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    YOUR TURN
    Task:
    This person chooses not to belong.
    • In what ways has this decision been
    prompted by and/or impacted upon the individual’s
    experiences and notions of identity,
    relationships, acceptance and understanding?
    • Describe the place that this person
    finds themself in. Your description must include
    full sensory detail, this means olfactory,
    visual and aural imagery.
  • 20. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    HSC MARKERS’ DOs AND DON’Ts – AREA OF STUDY: SECTION II
     
    DO:
     
    Compose a response that is lengthy enough to allow you to explore the concept of belonging in an enhanced manner.
    Demonstrate an understanding and conceptual awareness of belonging
    Demonstrate your ability to skilfully apply the mechanics of language, punctuation, sentence structure and paragraphing as these are important elements of writing
    Show an awareness of the question and the rubric
    Respond with originality and insight to the question; this applies to content as well as form
    Demonstrate an insightful understanding of the concept of belonging in an insightful and succinct manner
    Use an authentic, sustained and engaging voice
    Employ structural complexity and cohesion
     
    DON’T:
     
    Simply use a linear structure and discuss belonging with limited or no conceptual awareness
    Use imagery that is simplistic or clichéd
    Simply recount a basic situation of belonging or not belonging with minimum reflection on the concept of belonging
  • 21. AREA OF STUDY: Journey
    Section III(15 marks)
    There will be ONE question based on the Area of Study and prescribed texts.
    The question will require an extended response.
    Section III - RUBRIC
    In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
    demonstrate understanding of the concept of belonging in the context of your study
    analyse, explain and assess the ways belonging is represented in a variety of texts
    organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose and context.
  • 22. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    What does belonging mean?
    From the Oxford Dictionary and Thesaurus:
    belong, verb.
    1 to be rightly put into a particular position or class;
    2 fit or be acceptable in a particular place or environment;
    3 belong to be a member of;
    4 belong to be the property or possession of.
    belonging, noun. affiliation, acceptance, association, attachment, integration, closeness, rapport, fellow feeling, fellowship
    antonym: alienate, verb
    1 cause to feel isolated
    2 lose the support or sympathy
    Synonyms for alienate, verb: estrange, divide, distance, put at a distance, isolate, cut off, set against, turn away, drive apart, disunite, set at odds/variance, drive a wedge between
  • 23. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    THESIS STATEMENTS:
     
    The most successful essays have a clear focus, expressed in a thesis statement at the end of the first paragraph. The thesis statement is the most important sentence in the whole essay; weak thesis statements lead to weak essays. In an argumentative essay, the thesis statement should express the position you're taking on an issue. Effective essays are organised around the thesis; everything you write in the essay should directly or indirectly relate to the thesis statement.
    DEVELOPING A THESIS STATEMENT:
     
    The first way to tackle an essay is to READ, and read A LOT!! You cannot develop an effective thesis for your extended response if you haven’t read enough to inform the thesis. In class you have been given ample information (both verbal and written – in the form of copious handouts!!) to adequately answer all questions thrown at you by the HSC examiners. What you need to do is read, summarize and brainstorm the information. By now I am assuming that you have covered the first two stages of that task (yes, the reading and summarizing parts!) and that you are on to the brainstorming. This stage is important as it is where you actually develop your thesis. You need to decide which ideas in the texts you will focus on and why.
  • 24. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    Example introduction:
     
    An individual’s perception of belonging is determined by the world in which they live, grow and learn. Through the connections made with others and the world, an individual can better appreciate what it is to belong and thus develop a heightened sense of self-awareness . These very ideas about the nature of belonging and not belonging are explored through the employment of language, tone and recurring motifs in the poetry of Peter Skrzynecki, specifically ‘Felix Srzynecki’ and ‘Ancestors’, as well as the Australian western film The Proposition, and the novel Perfume (The Story of a Murderer)by Patrick Suskind. (ADD IN HERE A BIT RELATING TO THE ESSAY QUESTION)
  • 25. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    HSC MARKERS’ DOs AND DON’Ts – AREA OF STUDY: SECTION III
     
    DO:
     
    demonstrate a sophisticated control of language, expression and spelling in an integrated and logical structure
    display a depth of understanding of the concept of belonging and the ability to construct an argument in response to the question
    compose a response that it thoughtful and astute
    establish a sense of personal involvement in the argument, and engage with the question
    be prepared to respond to the specific issues raised by the examination
    display evidence of a personal voice and demonstrate a structured argument
    select suitable supporting evidence from your texts
    choose related material which demonstrate san insightful understanding of the concept of belonging and which add substance to your argument
    support your discussion of texts with reference to purpose, structure and language features
    skilfully analyse textual features in relation to a conceptual understanding of belonging commenting on their impact
    successfully link your texts by reflecting on your conceptual understanding and analysis as this will result in a perceptive and sophisticated argument
    address the question specifically
    explain how textual features contribute to your understanding of belonging
    confidently engaged with the question and its focus
    underpin your thesis with analysis and discussion in a cohesive manner
    integrate an analysis of textual features seamlessly to support your argument
    use related texts of a sophisticated nature that advance your point of view
    Analyse textual features making insightful comments, accompanied by close textual reference and appropriate quotations
    use a variety of textual features to support your argument
    USE THIS AS A CHECK LIST FOR YOUR DRAFT BELONGING ESSAY!!
  • 26. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    YOUR TURN
    Task:
    Write down your own thesis statement for the ‘belonging’ extended response.
    Now write an introduction using this thesis statement to answer the following essay question:
    To what extent has studying the concept of belonging expanded your understanding of yourself and your world?
     
    In your answer, refer to your prescribed text and at least TWO other related text of your own choosing.
  • 27. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
    PAST HSC QUESTIONS
    Rubric: (This will be the same for the trial and the HSC)
     
    “In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
    demonstrate understanding of the concept of belonging in the context of your study
    analyse, explain and assess the ways belonging is represented in a variety of texts
    organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose and context”
     
     2006
     
    More than anything else, physical journeys are about notions of identity.
    Do you agree?
    Argue your point of view.
    In your answer, refer to your prescribed text and TWO related texts.
    2005
    To what extent has studying the concept of belonging expanded your understanding of yourself and your world?
    In your answer, refer to your prescribed text and TWO related texts.
     
    2004
     
    ‘Belonging is essential to a fulfilled life.’
    Discuss this statement, focusing on how composers of texts represent the concept of the belonging.
    In your answer, refer to your prescribed text and TWO related texts.
     
  • 28. AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
  • 29. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    Module A: Comparative Study of Texts and Context
     
    This module requires students to compare texts in order to explore them in relation to their contexts. It develops students’ understanding of the effects of context and questions of value.
      Each elective in this module requires the study of groups of texts which are to be selected from a prescribed text list. These texts may be in different forms or media.
     
    Students examine ways in which social, cultural and historical context influences aspects of texts, or the ways in which changes in context lead to changed values being reflected in texts. This includes study and use of the language of texts, consideration of purposes and audiences, and analysis of the content, values and attitudes conveyed through a range of readings.
     
    Students develop a range of imaginative, interpretive and analytical compositions that relate to the comparative study of texts and context. These compositions may be realised in a variety of forms and media.
    (English Stage 6 Syllabus, p 51)
     
  • 30. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    Context defined …
     personal context refers to those elements that are one's own, individual and private
         cultural context is complex and refers generally to way of life, lifestyle, customs, traditions, heritage, habits - civilisation. More specifically, it refers to intellectual and artistic awareness, education and discernment. Popular culture refers to the Arts, the humanities, intellectual achievement, literature, music, painting and philosophy.
         historical context refers to the factual and documented evidence of a set time, either of the composer and/or the text.
         social context refers to the larger community or group, its organisation or hierachy. It also refers to that which is civil, public and of society at large.
  • 31. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    16th century Europe:
     
    time of change
    beginning of modern life
    Italian Renaissance spread to England
    growing economy – capitalist, money-based,
    scientific and technological innovation
    development of the printing press – making ideas, religious/philosophical/aesthetic/scientific rhetoric accessible to the people and the bible (people could question/judge/inquire into the teachings of the Church for themselves
    Reformation – Europe no longer united in religious belief, brought about social and political changes
    Initial optimism of populace dwindles due to changed social structure, rich became richer, poor became poorer
    growing middle classes due to merchant trading
    humanism
    Queen Elizabeth: an age of genius, exploration, national pride
    dynastic struggles between Spain, France, England and Scotland have cost Europe dearly and by the end of the century poverty rates are high causing tensions amongst the classes
  • 32. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
     
    Humanism:
    Scholars in the 16th century were heavily influenced by the ideologies of humanism. Humanism is a movement, started in Italy during the 15th century, which affirms the potential scope of human understanding and that, through the application of reason, all individuals have the capacity for self-determination. Humanism asserts that it is possible to come to a full understanding of humanity through the application of reason and scientific method and as a result individuals will acknowledge their free-will and with honour and integrity which will benefit the whole of society. Some humanist however, such as Michel de Montaigne, held that human understanding was limited due to the impossibility of knowing what lies beyond the ‘appearances’ which an individual projects to society.
  • 33. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    Wheel of Fortune:
    According to this medieval belief, still held by most people living during the Elizabethan era, the main controlling force in life is fate. All fate was determined by the Goddess Fortuna whose role it was to spin the wheel of fortune. The wheel of fortune visually depicts the precarious nature of man’s fortune.
    The Great Chain of Being:
    According to this medieval belief, still held by most people living during the Elizabethan era, everything and everyone exists in a certain order. This hierarchical view of the world posits God at the top of the chain, then the king, the pope, man, animals, plants and finally minerals. It was believed that any disruption to this chain of being, such as the murdering of a king, would create universal chaos.
  • 34. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    Some quotes from Shakespeare’s context:
    "In her (Nature's) inventions nothing is lacking, and nothing is superfluous."
    Leonardo da Vinci 1452 - 1519
    "The experience of our times shows that the princes who have done great things are the ones who have taken little account of their promises and who have known how to addle the brains of men with their craft."
    "So far as he is able, a prince should stick to the path of good but, if the necessity arises, he should know how to follow evil."
    "It is much safer for a prince to be feared than loved, if he is to fail in one of the two."
    "The prince must be a fox, therefore, to recognize the traps and a lion to frighten the wolves."
    "Men should either be treated generously or destroyed, because they take revenge for slight injures - for heavy ones they cannot."
    Niccolò Machiavelli 1469 - 1527
     
    "A desperate disease requires a dangerous remedy."
    Guy Fawkes 1570 - 1606
    "Cogito, ergo sum." (I think, therefore I am.)
    René Descartes 1596 - 1650
    "I am about to take my last voyage, a great leap in the dark." (Last words)
    Thomas Hobbes 1588 - 1679
  • 35. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    Aspects of Pacino’s 20th century context:
    Existentialism – Jean-Paul Satre
    Nihilism – Frederick Nietzsche
    War: WWI, WWII, Cold War, Vietnam War, Gulf War
    Civil Rights movement – liberty, human rights, equality, feminism, queer theory
    Religious uncertainty – atheism; secular society
    Psychology/Psychoanalysis – anxiety & neurosis
    Scientific revolutions – space race, Darwin, Einstein
    Postmodernism – focus on language and its role & power in society as well as its inadequacies
  • 36. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    Shakespeare’s context
    Pacino’s context:
    VALUES:
    progress
    freewill
    self-awareness
    tolerance
    emancipation
    materialist
    enlightenment
    virtue
    dignity
    honour
    Loyalty
    VALUES:
    reason
    democracy
    freedom
    human rights
    scepticism
    nihilism
    materialism
    disillusionment
    atheism/secularism
    individuality – or lack of it
  • 37. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    YOUR TURN
    Task:
    Write your own thesis statement for the extended response.
    Now write an introduction using this thesis statement to answer the following essay question:
    How does Pacino’sLooking for Richard sustain interest in the values represented in Shakespeare’s King Richard III ?
     
  • 38. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    PAST HSC QUESTIONS:
     
    Rubric: (This will be the same for the trial and the HSC)
     
    “In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
    • evaluate the relationships between texts and contexts
    • 39. organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose and form”
    2005:
     
    How does Pacino’sLooking for Richard sustain interest in the values represented in Shakespeare’s King Richard III ?  
    2004:
     
    How has your perception of Exploring Connections been illuminated by your comparative study of the prescribed texts?
  • 40. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    Dos and Do nots from the HSC Marking Centre
    DO: 
    Evaluate and analyse the comparative nature of the module through a well-developed thesis which incorporates a discussion of texts and contexts
    Demonstrate your individual learning and engagement with the plays
    Include detailed textual references to support your evaluation of the plays
    Write in an integrated way which allows you to demonstrate a clear understanding of the connection between the plays
    Ensure that a consideration of both composers’ context is integrated into the whole response
    Make strong connections between texts, contexts and the implications of the question
    Show a detailed knowledge of the plays and the techniques composers employ to convey meaning
    Remember that Module A is a comparative study and therefore plays should be explored in the light of their relationship rather than as separate entities
    Use textual references that are perceptive and well integrated to develop an effective argument
    Show appreciation of the way language forms, features and structures shape meaning
    Demonstrate a strong personal engagement through the use of a personal voice as well original examples
    Sustain a strong thesis
    Develop a highly literate responses which is well structured and clearly argued
    Demonstrate a clear engagement with the rubric and the question
    Explore the relationship between the texts and the values and attitudes of respective contexts
  • 41. MODULE A: Exploring Connections
    DO NOT:
     Simply make connections about the relationships between texts rather than making evaluative judgements
    Simply describe ideas about the texts instead of discussing context
    Use references that are inappropriate
    Allow context to become the focal point of your discussion.
    Rely on simple narration
    Fail to maintain a central focus
    Persist with a non-integrated approach by overlooking the comparative nature of the module
    Structure a response around themes and issues alone as this does not address the nature of transformations
    Use textual references that are inaccurate, inappropriate and obvious
    Simply identify language forms and features without explaining how language shapes meaning
    Heavily favour one text over the other
    Simply demonstrate an understanding of texts without dealing with the specific demands of the question
    Confine your response to a description of parallel events and characters in the two texts
  • 42. Ability to respond to the question
    Understands requirements of module
    Ability to write well
  • 43. MODULE B: Critical Study of Text
    Module B requires students to respond to their prescribed text both personally and intellectually through an analysis and evaluation of language, content and construction, leading to an understanding of its textual integrity. They develop and refine their own understanding and interpretations of the prescribed text and critically consider these in the light of the perspectives of others. Students explore how context influences their own and others' responses to the text and how the text has been received and valued.
    Textual integrity/overall unity- coherent use of form and language to produce an integrated whole in terms of meaning and value - either individual or whole body of work. It is the artistry of the moment.
  • 44. MODULE B: Critical Study of Text
    Textual integrity is a really broad term but, put very simply it's a measure of how well the text is written and how well it speaks to and is received by its audience, both during its time and today i.e. withstanding the test of time etc...
     
    The notion of textual integrity rests on the close reading of the text (language, form, structure) and how these things work to coherence (in meaning).
     
    Going out to notions of context (and also the interpretations of others) might then test out a (developing) notion of textual integrity, as it will shine new light on language and ideas etc. Reading for textual integrity is associated with a particular way of reading and the values that go with that. Students need to read "inwards" (to the text) to come to grips with it if they are to understand its textual integrity. THEN they might read "outwards" (to contextual matters, interpretations of others) to see if what they see as its integrity (or lack of it) holds up.
     
     
  • 45. MODULE B: Critical Study of Text
    Textual integrity refers to the extent to which the text makes internal sense, and leads a responder to ask:
    does it create a consistent world within its own boundaries?
    does it make sense within its own terms?
    if it raises questions about life or society, does it answer them?
    if it doesn’t, is this a deliberate device to suggest that there are no answers, or did the composer just neglect to provide answers?
    does the text stand up to close examination?
  • 46. MODULE B: Critical Study of Text
    Wikipedia definition:
    Integrity is consistency of actions, values, methods, measures, principles, expectations and outcome. As a holistic concept, it judges the quality of a system in terms of its ability to achieve its own goals. A value system's abstraction depth and range of applicable interaction may also function as significant factors in identifying integrity due to their congruence or lack of congruence with empirical observation. A value system may evolve over time while retaining integrity if those who espouse the values account for and resolve inconsistencies.
    Integrity may be seen as the quality of having a sense of honesty and truthfulness in regard to the motivations for one's actions. The term "hypocrisy" is used in contrast to integrity for asserting that one part of a value system demonstrably conflicts with another, and to demand that the parties holding apparently conflicting values account for the discrepancy or change their beliefs to improve internal consistency.
  • 47. MODULE B: Critical Study of Text
    YOUR TURN
    Task:
    Write your own thesis statement for the extended response.
    Now write an introduction using this thesis statement to answer the following essay question:
    Your class has been exploring the question, ‘What will continue to make Orwell’s essays worthy of critical study?’
     
    Your personal response has been challenged by another student. Defend your response through a critical evaluation of Orwell’s essays analysing the construction, content and language of the text.
  • 48. MODULE B: Critical Study of Text
    PAST HSC QUESTIONS
    Rubric: (This will be the same for the trial and the HSC)
     
    “In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
    demonstrate understanding of the ideas expressed in the text
    evaluate the text’s reception in different contexts
    organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose and form”
     
    2006:
     
    To what extent has your personal response to the essays been shaped by the enduring power of Orwell’s focus on language and power?
    Support your evaluation with a close analysis of TWO essays by Orwell.
    2005:
     
    Your class has been exploring the question, ‘What will continue to make Orwell’s essays worthy of critical study?’
     
    Your personal response has been challenged by another student. Defend your response through a critical evaluation of Orwell’s essays analysing the construction, content and language of the text.
    2004:
     
    ‘Interpretations of texts can shift and change with time and place.’
     
    Considering your time and place, reflect on the ways in which context has shaped your critical interpretation of the prescribed text.
     
    In your response, refer to TWO essays you have studied.
     
  • 49. MODULE B: Critical Study of Text
    DO:
    develop an informed personal understanding of Orwell’s essays
    analyse and evaluate language (essay-writing techniques), content (themes and subject matter) and construction (rhyme scheme/rhythm) of Orwell’s essays
    develop and refine your own understanding and interpretations of the essays critically and consider these in the light of the perspectives of others
    this means critics who have written about the writings of Orwell in a variety of different contexts since the time of the composition of the essays
    explore how context influences your own and others' responses to the text and how the text has been received and valued
    Remember context refers to Historical, Social and Cultural influences
    establish and maintain a clear thesis
    integrate a close critical analysis of the essays, with fluency and authority
    make reference to how others’ perspectives have informed and/or challenged your own understanding of the text
    firmly ground your response in the essays
    evaluate any ‘reading’ as it applies to the essays
    acknowledge and address the question in an integrated way
  • 50. MODULE B: Critical Study of Text
    DON’T:
    rely solely on supplementary support material
    use barely understood critical theory in your assessment of the essays
    use critical readings about the text as a substitute for your study of the essays
    use too much jargon as it impedes meaning, fluency and clarity
    simply present a prepared essay with little real attention to the requirements of the question
    rely on, or provide a regurgitation of, various critical theories or of ‘readings’ with little sense of an evaluation of or personal engagement with these ‘readings’
    ‘top and tail’ (make connections with the set question that are limited to the introduction and conclusion) the material that they have prepared for the examination.
    summarise rather than analyse
    simply describe various readings of the essays and fail to discuss the actual poems
    simply present a discussion/description of Orwell’s life rather than an analysis of his essays
  • 51. GLOSSARY OF KEY TERMS
    aesthetic Having an appreciation of beauty.
     
    affective
    Relating to a thoughtful consideration and evaluation of emotions and values associated with an idea or set of ideas.
    appropriated text
    A text which has been taken from one context and translated into another. The process of translation allows new insights into the original text and emphasises contextual differences between the two.
    assess To establish the value of a particular idea or text.
      
    concept A concept is an abstract idea derived or inferred from specific instances or occurrences. In the context of an Area of Study, ‘concept’ typically operates in and through language and text which enables ideas and experiences to be organised and at the same time shapes meaning and inferences.
    context The range of personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace conditions in which a text is responded to and composed.
    conventions
    Accepted practices or features which help define textual forms and meaning.
    creative thinking
    The ability to think laterally and imaginatively looking at all sides of an issue and devising interesting and imaginative solutions.
     
    critical thinking The ability to think using hypothesis and deduction as a way to question, interpret and draw conclusions.
     
    culture The social practices of a particular people or group, including shared beliefs, values, knowledge, customs and lifestyle.
    electronic media Media technology, such as television, the internet, radio, teletext and email, that communicates with large numbers of people.
     
    evaluate
    To estimate the worth of a text in a range of contexts and to justify that estimation and its process.
     
    explore To examine closely and experiment with texts.
     
    genre
    A category of text that can be recognised by specific aspects of its subject matter, form and language.
    imaginative
    The ability to think divergently, to generate original ideas by
    thinking drawing on emotional and cognitive experiences.
    interpretation
    Explanation of meaning within the context of one’s own understanding.
    language formsand features
    The symbolic patterns and conventions that shape meaning in texts. These vary according to the particular mode or medium of production of each text.
  • 52. GLOSSARY OF KEY TERMS cont.
    meaning The dynamic relationship between text and responder involving information (explicit and implicit), the affective and the contextual.
    medium The physical form in which the text exists or through which the text is conveyed.
    paradigmOrganising principles and underlying beliefs that form the basis of a set of shared concepts.
    perspective A way of regarding situations, facts and texts and evaluating their relative significance.
    popular culture Cultural experiences widely enjoyed by members of various groups within the community.
    recreating texts Transforming texts to explore how changes in particular elements of a text affect meaning.
    register The use of language in a text appropriate for its purpose, audience and context. A register suited to one kind of text may be inappropriate in another.
    representation The ways ideas are portrayed through texts.
    structuresof The relationships of the different parts of a text to each other
    texts and to the text as a complex whole.
    synthesis The collecting and connecting of many specific elements or ideas from various sources to form something new.
    systems of Principles and processes which combine to allow people to
    valuation ascribe value to texts.
    technology The knowledge, tools and processes used to create the medium in which the text exists or through which the text is conveyed.
    texts Communications of meaning produced in any medium that incorporates language, including sound, print, film, electronic and multimedia representations. Texts include written, spoken, nonverbal or visual communication of meaning. They may be extended unified works or series of related pieces.
    textual integrity The unity of a text; its coherent use of form and language to produce an integrated whole in terms of meaning and value.
    value (verb) To estimate or assign worth to a text; to consider something to have worth.
    value (noun) A quality desirable as a means or an end in itself.