Standard Recepies, Standard Specifications, Yield Analysis
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Standard Recepies, Standard Specifications, Yield Analysis

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Introducing the concept of Recipe Standardization, Costing and Yield Management.

Introducing the concept of Recipe Standardization, Costing and Yield Management.

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  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh It is no longer enough to meet customer demands but to exceed their expectations. This is more important today than ever because of the ever increasing competition. “If you do not keep your Customers Happy, then someone else will.”
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh To the common man, Good Food would simply imply serving the Hot Food Hot and the Cold Food Cold. It is as simple as that. If this criteria is met by your F & B Operation, you have satisfied your customer to a great extent. Customers today are well traveled the world over. They know what to expect for the Money that they are paying. They are now more savvy and have come to expect certain Food Quality given the type of Ambience / Theme / Décor of your Operation and for the Price that you Charge. Example: What Customer’s Expect from McDonalds – Fast Food Joint / Casual Surroundings / No Waiting Staff / No Glassware, Chinaware, Silverware / Less Skilled Staff / Assembly Line Production Techniques – Only Food Composition / Limited Menus. Due to the above appropriate Pricing. Customers perceive this as “Value for Money.” At the same time, the same Customer dines at the Zodiac Grill, he cannot expect the food to be priced at the same Pricing Structure used for McDonalds as Zodiac Grill is a Fine Dining Restaurant / Skilled Waiting Staff and Chefs / Food Produced is A La Carte and Customized Expensive Silverware, Glassware, Chinaware / Extensive Food & Beverage Menu etc. Hence, the Customer is charged an appropriate Price. This can also prove to be “Value for Money” for the Customer considering the Ambience and Physical Surroundings.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Consistency essentially means time and again. Produce the same results repeatedly. Consistency requires Standards to be in place.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh We shall explore in depth each Standard required in order to achieve CONSISTENCY in Food and Beverage Operations.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Deciding on the Menu for your Food & Beverage Operation: There are several factors that influence your choice of Menu. Some of these in brief are as follows: Type of establishment: Fine Dining / Specialty / Coffee Shop / Snack Bar / Lounge etc. Theme / Décor Area / Location Targeted Clientele: What type of Clientele is your operation targeting – College Kids / Business / Family. Competition Set USP (Universal Sales Proposition)
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh In some Organizations, it is also called Product Purchase Specifications (PPS).
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Typical Product Specifications would include all information that identifies with the item to be purchased. Example: SPS for an Apple to be purchased for the F&B Operation would be like: Product Name: Apple Product Variety: Red Delicious Quality Characteristics: Color: Red. Weight: 55 gm – 60 gm. Count per Kilogram: 16 – 18 Pc. Appearance: Bright Red in Color. Ripe in Appearance. Texture: Even and Smooth Skin. Firm to touch. Smell: Must be sweet to smell. Packaging: Apples should be packed in the Dozen delivered in wooden boxes. To see more examples on Product Specs. Please refer to Food Service Profitability – Sanders / Hill
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh There are certain Associations which develop Product Specifications. These may be at the National / Regional / Local Level. Most Large Hotels and Quality Food and Beverage Outlets develop Product Specs. Individually suited to their Operation. This is usually done in reference to Specs. Developed by Professional Associations. These Specs. Once developed would ideally be given to the Receiving Clerk of the Purchase Department who would be supervised from time to time by the Purchase Manager / Cost Controller ensuring the Specs. Were strictly followed.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Miscellaneous Information would include: Type of Plate Presentation / Glassware for the particular Cocktail / Oven Temperatures / Cooking Time etc. A Sample Standard Recepie is displayed in the next slide.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Points to be Noted: 1) Format designed in such a way that the Recepie can be adjusted cater to a Larger / Smaller Quantity. 2) Note Miscellaneous Information like: Baking Temperature / Total Preparation Time / Garnish. 3) Note Equipment Specification like # 60 Scoop to be used for portioning Margarine per Fillet.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh For Point 3) Labor Costs can be reduced by using Standard Recepies as staff can be suitable scheduled to meet Production Demands. Give Numerical Example from Note Book. Any Amount that is saved in the F&B Operation is an Addition to your Bottom Line. For Point 4) Since the Standard Recepies mention the exact Quantities required for a certain No. of Portions, Guess Work leading to possible wastage / shortage is eliminated. Also, there is no need for the Manager to always supervise. However, regular Quality checks must be conducted in order to ensure that the Standard Recepie is being followed.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Note : Standardized Recepies are generally recorded on a Card. To make the Card more informative and quicker to draw inference from a Photograph of the Dish is also attached to the Recepie Card. These are filed in the office of the Executive Chef. Photographs of Dishes with complete Plating and Garnish are generally pasted near the Food Pick – Up area. In this manner, both the Waiting Staff and the Cooks can see how exactly the Dish is to be presented to the Guests.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Development of a Standard Recepie for a New Dish is generally done on a Trial and Error Basis. Two or more cooks are given the a general recepie to prepare and the resultant product best in Taste / Aroma / Texture / Color / Appeal is then Standardized. During the Testing of a Standardized Recepie, the Dish is prepared by two or more Cooks to ensure a Consistency results no matter WHO is preparing the Recepie.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh However, when one compares the Pros of having Standard Recepies in place to the Cons, we reach the conclusion that it is far better having Standard Recepies in place. It is a must have for every Food & Beverage Operation.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Yield is the Net Weight of an item after Processing which is ready for Sale to the Guest.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh AP Weight can be defined as the Weight of an item upon Purchase. This item has not been subjected to any type of Processing or Preparation Methods. In other words, it is the weight of Raw Material upon Purchase. EP Weight: This is the Weight of the Prepared Portion of an item. The Item has been subjected to Processing and Preparation Methods making it ready for Guest Consumption.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Loss of Weight in the Preparation Stage: Trimming: Done in case of Vegetables to get rid of inedible parts and to obtain the desired shape and size. It is also done in case of meats to achieve the correct shape and weight in case of steaks / fillets, also to remove unwanted Fat from the Meat. De-Boning: Done for Meats and Fish. This is the Process of removing the Bones from the Meat. This is the Primary cause of weight loss. Cooking Stage: This stage impacts Weight Loss due to the Shrinkage of the item being cooked. Mainly in case of Meats – Heat results in the inherent Protein Coagulation. The method of cooking also impacts Weight Loss in the manner that – Slow and Long Cooking Methods such as Pot Roasting would result in a greater shrinkage than Shallow Frying / Sautéing.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Controlled Environment: In this type of Yield Test, the person carrying out the test is not disturbed by anything or anyone. He is not distracted at all. It is assumed that he has all the necessary Equipment to carry out the Test. Un – Controlled Environment: This is the exact opposite of a Controlled Environment where there is noise / disturbance and distractions. This is hence referred to as a Test Conducted in Operational Environment. The Yield in the Controlled Environment will always be greater than in the Un – Controlled Environment. There exists a GAP in the Yield and it is imperative for any Food & Beverage Operation to bridge this GAP through regular Training.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh In the example: We have Yield % = 4.734 / 9.588 * 100 = 49.82
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh In the example: Cost per servable Kg. = $ 4.95 / 49.82 % = $ 9.94
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Any layman would say that in order to cater to a 50 Pax function requiring the above, we would simple multiply per portion requirement times the Total Pax. This would amount to 10.000 Kg. Beef Rib. This would fall short of requirement as there there will be Weight Loss during the Preparation / Cooking Stages / Portioning Stages. The actual Order would be: 50 * 0.200 Kg. / Yield % = 10.000 Kg. / 49.82 % = 20.07 Kg. Of Beef Ribs.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Other Parameters would include the: Standard Ingredients / Standard Recepies / Standard Yield. In this case the Cost Factor would be: $ 9.94 / $ 4.95 = 2.00 If the AP Price Changes to say, $ 6.00 / Kg., then the Cost per Servable Kg. Would be $ 12. Confirming it by other means: Cost / Servable Kg. = $ 6.00 / .04982 = 12.04
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh If a Standard Recepie has a Desired Yield of 100 and you want to adjust the same to Yield 200 Portions, then each ingredient in the Standard Recepie would have to be multiplied by the Adjustment Factor (A.F.) which is computed as: 200 / 100 = 2.00
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Using the Adjustment Factor can prove to be very accurate if the Recepies Yield Does not change significantly. However, in cases where there is a substantial change in the Yield, the A.F. can be used as a guideline to start with. The Recepie can be suitably adjusted To – Taste at the Time of Trial or Preparation.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Consistency in terms of Value for Money perceived by the Guests is a major advantage of Standard Portion Sizes. Assumption of No Standard Portion Sizes: In such a case a Guest might receive a very large Portion on one occasion which he might perceive as Great Value for Money and on another occasion it might be the reverse.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Additional Information: In most Food and Beverage Production Areas, Standard Portion Sizes are displayed. This makes the staff aware of the Portioning helping to better control Recepie Yield and Costs. In addition to these two more control tools must be considered in case of Beverages: Glassware: Drinks must be served in the Standard Glassware. An alcoholic drink must not be too diluted or too strong. It must be an appropriate quantity to the Price Charged. Guest should perceive Value for Money. Standardization of Ice Cubes: Ice used must also be Standardized. Large Cubes do not pack themselves neatly into the glass leaving more spaces which must be filled. On the other hand smaller Ice Cubes or Ice Shaving neatly fill up space and give the perception of enhanced quantity.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh Preparation of Standard Dinner Cost Worksheets for a Table D’ Hote Menu.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh The Table D’ Hote Menu has choices too. This is to allow a variety to the customer and more flexibility in the operation. For Example: Vegetables – Du Jour. This would mean giving Seasonal Freshly Purchased Vegetables to the Guest. The Operation can also use up left overs from the Salad to make the Du Jour. This would help reduce the Food Cost of the Operation giving you greater profitability. There is a choice of Vegetables / Potato / Juice and Garnish. It would not be practical to compute the Menu Costs with all possible combinations. Hence for this Food and Beverage Operators make some approximations: For example: 1) Cost of the most Popular item is used on the Menu Costing Sheet. 2) Cost of the most Expensive item is used when doing menu costing. 3) Average is computed by observation of consumption over a period of time. The Dinner Costing Sheet provides for extra columns to account for Price Change of Ingredients in the future. This would result in the Standard Recepie Cost Change which would then have to be incorporated into the Menu Costing Sheet to arrive at New Menu Costs.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh The Ingredient File would maintain records of all Ingredients used by the Food & Beverage Operation along with data such as Supplier Name, Purchasing Unit, Cost per Purchasing Unit, Ingredient Cost, Issuing Units etc. This File may also carry Product Specs. Standard Recepie File: The Standard Recepie File would carry all information contained in a Recepie Card which is manually prepared. The advantage of maintaining a Standard Ingredient File on a Recepie Management Application is that this interfaces with the Ingredient File and incorporates any changes in the Ingredient File into the Standard Recepie File pertaining to Ingredient Costs. This means that if the Cost / Unit of an ingredient were to change, then the Recepie Management Application would automatically update the Standard Recepie File which also computes Cost per Portion. Another feature of the Recepie Management Application with relation to the Standard Recepie File is that it can generate Sub – Recepie File in terms of Yield Required automatically. Menu Item File: This is a very important file as it contains all information related to the Sales of a Food & Beverage Operation and Data in the form of Reports can be retrieved based on several Criteria as required by the Management for Evaluation. Menu Item Sales can be used for purposes of Menu Engineering, Item Sales Information can be reviewed on a daily basis to Compute Daily Food Costs for the Operation. Menu Item File
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh A Standard Food Cost serves as a Bench Mark against which Daily Food Costs of the Operation are compared in most cases. Corrective Action can be taken immediately if the Daily Food Cost has shot up unjustifiably.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh A Broad Based approach is taken in larger Food and Beverage Operations wherein Food Costs are computed across Meal Periods and on a Monthly Basis in most cases.
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management - III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh

Standard Recepies, Standard Specifications, Yield Analysis Standard Recepies, Standard Specifications, Yield Analysis Presentation Transcript

  • Standard Recipes, Standard Specifications, Yield Analysis & Recepie Costing Food & Beverage Management Year III Prepared By: Bhavin Parekh 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Need for Quality Standards???
    • Basic Goal of a Food Service Operation – Satisfying Customers by “ Meeting and Exceeding ” Customer Expectations.
    • Basic Expectations: 1) Timely Service
    • 2) Cleanliness
    • 3) Good Quality Food
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Good Food???
    • 1) Serving Hot Food Hot and Cold Food Cold.
    • 2) Offering the Food Quality Expected given the type of Physical Surroundings and the Price Charged.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • ART of Managing a Food Service Operation
    • It is to determine Customer Expectations and then to Coordinate all staff activities to satisfy those expectations.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • CONSISTENCY???
    • In Order to satisfy a Customer, it becomes very important to “Consistently” Deliver foods that meet the Customer’s Expectations.
    • “ Consistency” in terms of TASTE and QUALITY OF FOOD.
    • Consistency is very important to Customer Satisfaction leading to Customer Loyalty and Good Will.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • What Standards we need for Consistency?
    • Standard Ingredients
    • Standard Recepies
    • Standard Yield
    • Standard Costing
    • Standard Portioning
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 1) Standard Ingredients
    • The Menu is the starting point for this.
    • Once the Menu has been decided for your Food and Beverage Operation you can determine the Raw Materials / Ingredients that you will require.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • SPS???
    • For the Operation to Purchase the Correct Ingredients , it requires Ingredient Specifications or commonly referred to as Standard Purchase Specifications (SPS) .
    • In hotel lingo, it is also called Product Specs.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • What is meant by Specs.???
    • Defining Specifications:
      • It is defined as a complete description of the Ingredient / Raw Material.
    • Where SPS are used?
      • SPS are widely used in Standard Recipes and Costing Purposes.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Where to get Product Specs.?
    • Associations like the United States Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) have developed Product Specs. for Fruits / Vegetables / Meats (except Seafood).
    • Another Association which has developed Product Specs. for Meats only is the North American Meat Processors Assoc. (NAMP).
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 2) Standard Recepie
    • Definition:
    • A Standard Recepie is a formula for producing a Food or Beverage Item.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Information given by the Standard Recepie
    • Summary of Ingredients Used
    • Required Quantity of Ingredients
    • Preparation Procedures
    • Portion Size and Portioning Equipment
    • Garnish and Miscellaneous Information
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Advantages of a Standard Recepie
    • Regardless of “Who” prepares the Dish, “When” it is prepared and to “Whom” it is to be served, the Dish will always Appear the same, Taste the same and Cost the same.
    • Excess Production or Short Production will not occur as the No. of Portions is known through the Standard Recepie.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Advantages of a Standard Recepie
    • Indication of Equipment Required for Production and the Time taken for Preparation of the Recepie. Hence, Equipment and Labor can be effectively scheduled.
    • Elimination of Guess Work by the Chefs / Bartenders preparing the Dish / Cocktail as exact quantities are mentioned in the Recepie. This also leads to less Supervision.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Advantages of a Standard Recepie
    • Food and Beverage Production is not limited to the Chef or the Bartender. If they call in sick or do not show up for work, the Dish or Cocktail can be prepared by other staff.
    • “ FOR THE SHOW MUST GO ON ”
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Developing Standard Recepies
    • It does not require throwing out the existing Recepies and starting afresh. It involves Standardizing the existing Recepies according to a series of Steps.
    • Steps:
      • Selection of a Time Frame. For e.g. The Executive Chef may decide to Standardize 3 Recepies per week.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Developing Standard Recepies
    • Steps (cont’d)…
      • Ask the Cook to talk through the preparation of the Item. These may include:
        • Ingredients Required for the Preparation of a Dish
        • Quantity of Each Ingredient
        • Exact Procedure for the Preparation of the Dish – Sequence of Mixing Ingredients, Cooking Method, Cooking Time at each stage, Cooking Temperature (High Flame / Low Flame) etc.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Developing Standard Recepies
    • Steps (cont’d)…
        • Portioning of the Recepie and Portioning Control Tools / Equipment – Deep Ladle, # 60 Scoop, Shallow Serving Spoon etc.
        • Plate to be used for Presentation.
        • Garnish / Accompaniments to be served along with the Dish if any.
      • Double Check the Recepie by observing the Cook as the items are being prepared.
      • Record the Recepie in a Standardized Format so that it may be helpful for others to prepare the Item.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Developing Standard Recepies
    • After the Standardized Recepie is ready, it must be shared with the other staff. Their views and opinions on the same must be taken into account and where possible the change incorporated.
    • Finally the Recepie must be tested to ensure that the desired result is produced and the Dish is replicated again and again in Taste / Flavor / Texture / Aroma (Quality and Quantity).
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Disadvantages of Standard Recepies
    • Takes Away all Creativity from the Kitchen Staff / Bartenders’ Point of View. There is no room for experimenting.
    • Developing Standard Recepies is a very time consuming and tedious process.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 3) Standard YIELDS
    • Definition:
    • The term Yield is defined as the Net Weight of a Food Item after it has been processed and made ready for sale to a Guest.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Yield Terminology
    • As Purchased Weight (AP – Weight) : It is defined as the Weight of an item upon Purchase.
    • Edible Portion Weight (EP – Weight) : It is defined as the Weight of an item subjected to Processing and Preparation Methods making it ready for Sale to the Guests.
    • Production Loss = AP Weight – EP Weight
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Why is YIELD important???
    • It is very important for the Food & Beverage Operator to know the Standard Yield because he should not:
      • Waste his money buying Ingredients which have a Poor EP Weight
      • High wastage
      • Having no other use.
    • Note: Such Ingredients must in most cases be avoided and where possible substituted with an alternative.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Steps in the Production Process Resulting in Weight Loss
    • Preparation Stage: Resultant Loss in the Weight are due to the following:
      • Trimming
      • De – Boning
    • Cooking Stage: Losses result due to the Cooking Process (Shrinkage in case of Meats mostly – an effect of Heat on Protein content in the meat). The method of Cooking also impacts weight loss.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Steps in the Production Process Resulting in Weight Loss
    • Portioning: In case the Prepared Items have not been Pre – Portioned, Losses result during the process of Portioning – Spillages / Carvings.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Standard Yield???
    • Defining Standard Yield :
      • A Standard Yield results when the Item is prepared as per the Specific Standard Procedures as mentioned in the Standard Recepie.
    • Standard Yields are determined by conducting Yield Tests . In case of Meat Products these Tests are also called as Butcher’s Tests .
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • About Yield Tests (For Smart Guys)
    • Yield Tests must be done at least 3 times for every product purchased.
    • They must be conducted under two types of conditions:
    • Controlled Environment
    • Un – Controlled Environment / Operational Environment
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Computing Yield %???
    • On obtaining the Edible Portion Weight through a Yield Test we can compute the Yield % of an Item.
    • Yield % = EP Weight x 100
    • AP Weight
    • (Ratio of Servable Weight to Original Weight)
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Cost per Servable Kilogram???
    • Cost per Servable Kilogram is computed as follows:
    • Cost / Servable Kg. = AP Price
    • Yield %
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • How much do you Need to Purchase???
    • Assume that there is a 50 Pax Banquet Function which requires 200 gm. Portions of Beef Rib. How much would you Order?
    • Order Quantity = 50 * 0.200Kg.
    • Yield %
    • = 20.07 Kg.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • COST FACTOR???
    • The Cost Factor is a Constant Value which is used to convert new AP Prices into Cost per Servable Kg. Assuming that all other Parameters remain the same.
    • Cost Factor = Cost per Servable Kg.
    • AP Price
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Adjusting Standard Yield Recepies
    • The Yield from a Standard Recipe can be Increased or Decreased using the Adjustment Factor (A.F.)
    • Adjusting for the Increase / Decrease in the No. of Pax:
    • A.F. = Desired Yield
    • Original Yield
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Adjusting Standard Yield Recepies
    • Adjusting for the Increase or Decrease in the Portion Size:
    • A.F. = Desired Portion Size
    • Original Portion Size
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Adjusting Standard Yield Recepies
    • Adjusting the Standard Recepie for Increase / Decrease in the Portion Size and In the No. of Pax.
    • A.F. = Desired Volume
    • Original Volume
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 4) Standard Portion Sizes
    • Each Food and Beverage Standard Recepie indicates a Standard Portion Size.
    • Advantages:
    • This is another “ Cost Control Tool. “
    • Ensures Consistency in the Operation.
    • Guest receive the same Value for Money.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • VALUE???
    • Value is a Relationship between
    • Price & Quality
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Portion Control Tools
    • Portion Control Tools must be available every time a Menu Item (Food / Beverage ) is prepared.
    • Examples of Portion Control Tools:
    • Weighing Equipment
    • Measuring Equipment
    • Ladles
    • Scoops
    • Jiggers / Peg Measures
    • Shot Glasses
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 5) Standard Portion Costs: Food Only
    • After Standard Recepies and Standard Portion Sizes have been developed, the Standard Portion Costs can be computed.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Standard Dinner Costs
    • Most Food Service Operations combine Individual Menu Items to create a Lunch / Dinner Menu – Table D’ Hote.
    • Each item on the Table D’ Hote Menu is individually Costed through Standard Recepie Costing
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Computing Standard Beverage Costs
    • Just like Standard Recepies for Food there are Standard Recepies made for Beverages. These are then Costed in order to establish Standard Costs for Beverages.
    • Establishing a Drink Cost for Beverages is relatively simple as the No. of items involved are less.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Computer Applications: Recepie Management
    • A Recepie Management Software maintains 3 very important files. These are as follows:
    • Ingredient File
    • Standard Recepie File
    • Menu Item File
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • 07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Standard Food Cost per Meal
    • Operations offering more than one menu such as a separate Lunch and Dinner menu must decide to compute Standard Food Costs across all Meals Periods or to do the same individually for each Meal Period.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Standard Food Cost per Meal
    • Advantages of Computing Food Costs per Meal Period:
    • Standard food costs are separated by meal periods, hence allowing for a comparison.
    • Corrective Action can be focused on a specific Meal Period if the Food Cost during the Meal Period is > Standard Food Cost
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Standard Beverage Costs
    • Standard Beverage Costs are calculated for exactly the same reason as Standard Food Costs.
    • The Operator wants to establish a Base against which Actual Beverage Operation Costs would be compared.
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • Standard Beverage Costs – The Formula
    • Opening Inventory Value +
    • Total Requisition Value –
    • Closing Inventory Value =
    • Gross Beverage Cost +
    • Value of Transfers to the Bar –
    • Value of Transfers from the Bar –
    • Cost of Complimentary Drinks =
    • Net Beverage Cost
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • ASSIGNMENTS & TESTS
    • Yield Test to be conducted on two samples of Food Products. Results to be recorded and analyzed. (Group Task)
    • To make a Standard Recepie for Soup, Salad, Main Course, Dessert, Beverage. This will be Costed and Standard Portion Costs computed. Also a Standard Dinner Costing will be done.
    • TEST – Theory and Numericals
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • References
    • Food, Beverage and Labor Cost Controls
    • - Dittmer and Keefe III
    • Food & Beverage Controls
    • - Jack Ninemeier
    07/11/10 Food & Beverage Management III Yr. - Bhavin Parekh
  • LINKING TO THE NEXT TOPIC
    • Menu as a Control Tool
    • Menu Planning – Concepts / Trends / Marketing / Changes
    • Calculating Menu Selling Prices
    • Evaluating the Menu – Popularity / Profitability / Improving the Menu
    • Menu Engineering – Theory / Concepts / Practice