Suitability and Quality of Packaging Materials for Drugs & Biologicals 
Dr. Bhaswat S. Chakraborty 
Sr. Vice President, Re...
Suitability of Packaging System for Intended Use 
Needless to say, a packaging system must be suitable for its intended us...
All tests for assuring protection must be well designed and completely validated. 
Compatibility: Sometimes a packaging co...
 Additional performance of the packaging material may have to withstand the rigors of loading, shipping 
and storing. 
 
Q...
excipents. Packaging components perform up to the functional standard specified in their intended use 
and also deliver th...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Suitability and quality of packaging materials for drugs

2,354 views
2,198 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,354
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
32
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Suitability and quality of packaging materials for drugs

  1. 1. Suitability and Quality of Packaging Materials for Drugs & Biologicals  Dr. Bhaswat S. Chakraborty  Sr. Vice President, Research & Development,   Cadila Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Ahmedabad  Good packaging system is an integral part of an effective, safe and quality medicine.  It is not merely a  good dressing to create an attractive market image of the product.  A packaging system or container  closure system is a technical name for all those packaging components that contain, protect and  maintain the quality of such a medicine (drug, biological or vaccine).  Such a system includes primary  packaging components and sometimes secondary components as well, when additional protection or  other purposes are to be served.  Glass and plastics are often used as the material in the primary  packaging of bottles, ampoules, vials, pre‐filled syringes etc., whereas cardboard paper is extensively  used in the secondary packaging. In addition, a market package contain labeling, dispensing accessories  and wraps, and this entire market package is the one that a retail consumer receives.   This article briefly summarizes the Suitability and Quality Control guidelines for Packaging Materials  mainly based on USFDA suggestions.  Figure 1: Factors governing the suitability and quality control of the container closure system  (also known as packaging system) used in an NDA, ANDA or BLA.   Regulatory agencies would require the sponsor of the New Drug or Biologics application to provide full  description of the container and closure system and its compatibility with the drug and excipients. Each  system must be specific for the drug or biologic for which it has been designed.  Figure 1 depicts the  factors governing the suitability and quality control of the packaging system used in an application.  The  quality and quantity of information also depend on route of administration of the dosage form and the  likelihood of its interaction with packaging components.  For example, information of an inhalation  product packaging has to be more elaborate than that of oral solution or tablet (Figure 2).  
  2. 2. Suitability of Packaging System for Intended Use  Needless to say, a packaging system must be suitable for its intended use.  Suitability, here, has a  specific meaning in that it should adequately protect the dosage form, be compatible with the latter and     Figure 2: Examples of packaging concerns for common classes of drug products (adapted from  US FDA guidance).  The higher the concerns and the likelihood of interaction of packaging  material and dosage form, more elaborate information would be required by the regulators.  be composed of materials that are safe for use with the dosage form and the route of administration. In  addition, if it has a performance feature in addition to containing the product, the composite container  closure system must function properly. Detailed description of the tests, methods, acceptance criteria,  reference standards, and validation information for the studies should be provided directly in the  application or indirectly through a DMF.    Protection: Packaging system must provide adequate protection from exposure to light, loss of solvent,  exposure to reactive gases (e.g., oxygen), absorption of water vapor, microbial contamination or any  other contamination. Not all products would be affected by all these factors. Well designed laboratory  studies can determine which factors are actually affecting a particular drug product.    There are standard ways of achieving protection from the factors listed above.  For example, protection  from light is achieved by using an opaque or amber‐colored Container. Loss of solvent can be avoided by  sealing the leaks or using a less permeable barrier.  Similarly, absorption of water vapor can be stopped  by using proper glass containers with effective sealing. Protection from microbial contamination can be  achieved by maintaining container integrity after the packaging system has been sealed.  There are also  innovative and emerging technologies that can be used to give an adequate and measurable protection  by packaging of the drug products.   
  3. 3. All tests for assuring protection must be well designed and completely validated.  Compatibility: Sometimes a packaging component can interact with the drug product (drug or  excipient). Examples of such interactions include degradation of the active drug induced by a chemical  leaching from the packaging component or reduction in the concentration of the excipients because of  absorption. Changes in drug product pH, discoloration of dosage form or the packaging component  brittleness of the latter due to such interaction constitute some other examples.     Qualification studies on the container closure system can detect some of these interactions. In order to  detect other interactions one must carry out suitable stability indicating assays. Any change that is  indicative of an interaction between the dosage form and packaging component should be investigated  such that its root cause is identified, corrected and documented.     Safety: The materials used in packaging system and its components must be such that they will not  exude or leach any toxic or undesirable substances that will cause an adverse reaction in patients who  are being treated with the drug product. This is especially true for those components which are in direct  contact with the dosage form or may diffuse into the dosage form such as an ink or an adhesive. As  depicted in Figure 2, the safety concerns (because of interaction between dosage form and packaging)  may increase the depending on the route of administration. Therefore, good amount of  experimentations along with knowledge from literature must be used to minimize the safety risks.     For an injection, inhalation, ophthalmic, or transdermal, a comprehensive safety study is appropriate. An  extraction study on the packaging component determining the concentrations of the chemicals leaching  out of the packing component must be followed by a toxicological evaluation of those chemicals. The  toxicological evaluation of the chemicals posing safety risks are based on standard scientific principles  that take in to account a packaging component, the drug product, the route of administration and  chronic or acute exposure.  For many injectable and ophthalmic drug products, data from the USP  Biological Reactivity Tests and USP Elastomeric Closures for Injections provide sufficient evidence of  material safety.     In USA, materials used for packaging components in containing many solid and liquid oral products, can  be tested using food additive regulations (21 CFR 174‐186). These regulations include purity criteria and  limitations pertaining to the use of specific materials for packaging foods that may be acceptable for the  evaluation of drug product packaging components.     Performance: A container closure system should be able to function in a manner for which it is intended  to. It does more than simply containing the dosage form. When evaluating its performance, its  functionality and drug delivery — both are considered.     Container closure system functionality may improve patient compliance (e.g., a cap that contains a  counter), minimize waste (e.g., a two‐chamber vial or IV bag) or improve ease of use (e.g., a  Pre‐filled syringe).     Drug delivery is the performance of a packaging system to deliver the dosage form in the amount or at  the rate described in the package insert. A prefilled syringe, a transdermal patch or a metered tube is an  example of such delivery performance.   
  4. 4.  Additional performance of the packaging material may have to withstand the rigors of loading, shipping  and storing.    Quality Control of Packaging Components  Suitability for intended use of the packaging material must be complemented with appropriate use of  quality control measures to assure its standard and consistency in all batches of production of the  dosage form. These will limit the variation in specification of manufacturing procedures and raw  materials for packaging construct. Table 1 summarizes  principal physicochemical considerations applied  in the quality control of pharmaceutical packaging systems.   Table 1 : Quality control of packaging components based on physical characterization and chemical  composition  Physical characteristics  Chemical composition  Dimensional criteria  Change in formulation  Physical parameters for consistent  manufacturing  Change in processing aid   Performance characteristics  Change in the manufacturing process  Other parameters  Change in supplier of raw materials    Among  the  physical  characteristics,  dimensional  criteria  include  control  of  shape,  neck  finish,  wall  thickness,  design  tolerances,  etc.,  whereas  manufacturing  parameters  of  a  packaging  component  indicate  consistency  in  unit  and  weight,  etc.  Performance  characteristics,  on  the  other  hand,  is   exemplified  by  metering  a  valve  delivery  or  ease  of  a  syringe  movement.  Variations  in  dimensional  parameter  may  affect  package  permeability  and  drug  delivery  performance.  Variation  in  physical  manufacturing parameter can affect the quality of a dosage form.   The  chemical  composition  of  the  material  that  has  been  used  to  construct  the  packaging  can  affect  safety, compatibility and performance of the drug product. New or unknown materials can interact with  the drug or excipinets or change the flow properties of the formulation. A composition change may be a  result of a change in formulation, in a processing aid or because of a new supplier of raw materials. The  use  of  stability  indicating  assays  and  stability  studies  with  pre‐defined  specifications  to  preserve  chemical compositions are the key to a successful quality control program. These programs definitely  ensure protection and performance of the packaging system. Except for inhalation products, however,  right now there is no regulation for strict monitoring of packaging system to ensure safety.  In most of the pharmaceutical companies, packaging inspection is part of quality control. These days,  this function is as much automated as possible. However, in the physical and chemical checks, there are  still areas which are best done manually with bare human senses with adequate training.  Conclusion  Modern packaging systems for drug and biological products are well suited for their intended use.  They  not  only  give  protection  to  the  contents,  they  are  also  reliably  safe,  compatible  with  the  drug  and 
  5. 5. excipents. Packaging components perform up to the functional standard specified in their intended use  and also deliver the dosage form in the amount or at the rate described in the package insert.  Quality  control of the packaging materials including the raw chemicals to construct these materials is carried out  to maintain consistency in both physical characters and chemical composition.   

×