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Modern movements

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it is for b.arch students (visual arts and appreciation)

it is for b.arch students (visual arts and appreciation)

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  • PILLARS
  • one of a series of small projecting rectangular blocks forming a molding esp. under a cornice
  • Eclecticism is a kind of mixed style in the fine arts:The term Victorian architecture refers collectively to severalarchitectural styles employed predominantly during the middle and late 19th century. 
  • EX OF BEG. OF MODERN ART IN USA
  • The movement attracted not only poets, musicians, artist but also a number of architects.
  • In RUSSIA
  •  naturally occurring patterns or shapes reminiscent of nature. 
  • one who conducts religious revivalsa motif is an element of a pattern.
  • INSTEAD OF SPREADIND THEY DIVE HIGH ,NATURE
  • the selectivity of the elite ; esp: snobbery ‹~ in choosing new members›

Transcript

  • 1. 1 20th CENTURY ARTGROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 2. 2 INTRODUCTION  The building designs of this era were intended to be more exact versions of earlier architectural styles and traditions.GROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 3. 3 Colonial Revival architecture  Identifiable Features  1. Columned porch or portico 2. Front door sidelights 3. Pilasters 4. Symmetrical Facade 5. Double-hung windows, often multi-paned 6. Bay windows or paired or triple windows 7. Wood shutters often with incised patterns 8. Decorative pendants 9. Side gabled or hipped roofsGROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 4. 4 Classical Revival Style Identifiable Features 1. Formal symmetrical design, usually with center door 2. Front facade columned porch 3. Full height porch with classical columns 4. Front facing gable on porch or main roof 5. Broken pediment over entry door 6. Decorative door surrounds, columns, or sidelights 7. Side or front portico or entry porch 9. Rectangular double hung windows 10. Roof line balustradeGROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 5. MODERN MOVEMENTSIN THE WORLD OF ART
  • 6. 6 INTRODUCTION  The Modern Movement of architecture represents a dramatic shift in the design of buildings.  Based on the use of the new man-made materials, steel & metal – frame construction.  Elevator helped America to invent the skyscraper  Use of concrete & glass to create functional buildings with clean lines & without decoration.GROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 7. 7 Common themes of modern architecture include:  The notion that "Form follows function", a dictum originally expressed by Frank Lloyd Wrights early mentor Louis Sullivan, meaning that the result of design should derive directly from its purpose.  Simplicity and clarity of forms and elimination of "unnecessary detail“.  Visual expression of structure (as opposed to the hiding of structural elements).  Use of industrially-produced materials; adoption of the machine aesthetic.  Particularly in International Style modernism, a visual emphasis on horizontal and vertical lines.GROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 8. 8 Early modernism  Modern architecture as primarily driven by technological and engineering developments.  Modernism is a matter of taste,  A reaction against eclecticism and the lavish stylistic excesses of Victorian and Edwardian architecture.GROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 9. The Robie 9House (1910)in Chicago.GROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 10. 10 In Italy: Futurism Futurist architecture began in the early-20th century, characterized by anti-historicism and long horizontal lines suggesting speed, motion and urgency. Technology and even violence were among the themes of the Futurists.GROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 11. 11Constructivistarchitecture CLUSTERED FORMATIONGROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 12. 12ExpressionistarchitectureThe style was characterised by an early-modernist adoption of novelmaterials, formal innovation, andvery unusual massing, sometimes inspiredby natural organic forms,sometimes by the new technical possibilitiesoffered by the mass production ofbrick, steel and especially glass. Making notable use of sculptural forms andthe novel use of concrete as artisticelements,GROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 13. 13 Style Moderne: tradition and modernism The adoption of the machine aesthetic, glorification of technological advancement and new materials, while at the same time adopting or loosely retaining revivalist forms and motifs, and the continued use of ornament.GROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 14. 14 Urban design and mass housing THIS WAS THE CONSTRUCTION AFTER TH WORLD WAR TWOGROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 15. 15 Tube architecture A new structural system of framed tubes appeared in skyscraper design and constructionGROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 16. 16 THE BAUHAUS  THE BAUHAUS-A group of European artist architects committed to create a building for future.  There workshops were laboratories for experiments in glass, metal & furniture design that emphasized purity of form and functionGROUP-3 12/1/2012
  • 17. 17 Criticism Modern architecture met with some criticism, which began in the 1960s on the grounds that it seemed universal, elitist, and lacked meaning.GROUP-3 12/1/2012