Session 1&2 problem_framing_overview

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Session 1&2 problem_framing_overview

  1. 1. Problem Framing Kavindra Kumar Singh Assistant Professor – ITIILM GSM, Greater Noida
  2. 2. What is Problem?• If you have started from the wrong place – with the wrong decision problem – you won’t have made the smart choice.• The way you state your problem frames your decision.• It determines the alternatives you consider and the way you evaluate them.• A good solution to a well-posed decision problem is almost a smarter choice than an excellent solution to a poorly posed one.
  3. 3. Decision Problem• Ask what triggered this decision. Why I’m considering it?• Question the constraints in your problem statement.• Identify the essential elements of the problem.• Understand what other decisions impinge on or hinge on this decision.• Establish a sufficient but workable scope for your problem definition.• Gain fresh insights by asking others how they see the situation.
  4. 4. How do you define decision Problem?• The best method for defining or redefining – Start by writing down your initial assessment of the basic problem, then question it, test it, hone it.
  5. 5. Ask what triggered this decision. Why am I even considering it?• Immigrant
  6. 6. Cont…• Triggers can bias your thinking.• Because they can trap you into viewing the problem only in the way it first occurred to you.• For example; Your boss asks you to choose a new mailing-list software package. The problem might not actually be: What’s the best package to buy? The real problem may be: What’s the best way to manage our company’s direct-mail program?• You may find that you don’t need new software at all. You need to contract with an outside company to take over the mailing effort.
  7. 7. Return Question the constraints in your problem statement • Problem definitions usually include constraints. • For example; When should we conduct the three- month market test of our new credit card offering in the India? • Constraints of given example are; (1) There will be a market test, (2) It will last three months, and (3) It will be in the India. • Often, such constraints are useful – they focus your choice and prevent you from wasting time.

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