Self Regulation Theory & Strategies
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  • Learners with high levels of self-regulation have good control over the attainment of their goals. Conscious self-regulation requires a student to focus on the process of how to acquire these skills.
  • TALKING POINTS:When you go to professors office hours have a list of prepared questions to review….
  • PLAY VIDEO CLIP – RYAN LOCHTE.

Self Regulation Theory & Strategies Self Regulation Theory & Strategies Presentation Transcript

  • Self-Regulation Online Learning Modules Module 1: Self Regulation Developed by: Dr. Sara Renzulli, CLAS Academic Services Center
  • What is achievement? When you accomplish something that is important to you by expending effort and developing skills.
  • What is Self Regulation? • Self-regulation is an integrated learning process, consisting of the development of a set of constructive behaviors that affect one's learning. These processes are planned and adapted to support the pursuit of personal goals in changing learning environments (NRC/GT).
  • Some additional information about self regulation • Self-regulated learning involves the regulation of three general aspects of academic learning (Zimmerman, 1989).
  • Self Regulation of Behavior SELF REGULATION Self Regulation of Cognition Self Regulation of Motivation and Affect
  • 3 ‘aspects’ of self regulation (according to Zimmerman) • Self Regulation of Behavior: – Involves the active control of the resources students have available to them, such as: • Their time, their study environment, who they study with, their use of academic support (faculty, tutors etc). • Self Regulation of Motivation and Affect: – Involves controlling and changing motivational beliefs such as selfefficacy and goal orientation, so that students can adapt to the demands of the course. In addition, students can learn to control their emotions and affect in ways that improve their learning (NRC/GT). • Self Regulation of Cognition: – Involves the control of various cognitive strategies for learning, such as the use of deep processing strategies that result in better learning and performance than students showed previously.
  • LETS EXPLORE THESE THREE ASPECTS OF SELF REGULATION IN A LITTLE MORE DETAIL…..
  • Self Regulation of Behavior SELF REGULATION Self Regulation of Cognition Self Regulation of Motivation and Affect
  • (1) Self regulation of behavior • Involves the active control of the resources students have available to them, such as: – Active control of: • Time • Study environment – Who you study with • Positive use of peers and faculty members to help (not hinder) the studying process – Appropriate and proactive use of academic support services available to you on Uconn’s campus.
  • Behavior: Strategy 1 Environmental Structuring • Actively manipulating the environment in which you study with the intention of increasing academic productivity. • Environmental structuring may involve: – Finding a quieter environment to study, for example the library instead of a dorm room. – Finding an environment that has less people in it. For example, a small study room in the library rather than bookworms café. – Not listening to music while studying. – Disconnecting wireless internet (unless needed for course assignments). – Leaving cell phones in a different location. – Creating an organized, clean space in which to do your work.
  • A few more thoughts on Environmental Structuring Behavior: Strategy 1 • Environmental structuring may look different for each individual person. Some learners cannot focus if a room is to quiet and peaceful, while others could be distracted by the smallest sound. • It is important step back, and think about what environments have been the most successful places for you to accomplish academic tasks in, then begin recreating that environment.
  • Proactive and frequent use of faculty on campus Behavior: Strategy 2 • All Uconn professors, faculty, TA’s and other staff want students to succeed in their courses. It is your responsibility as a student to put aside personality differences you may have with faculty members and do what you need to do to be successful in your course work. • So… some actions you could consider taking are: – Going to professors office hours at least twice a month. – Contacting the professor before the class starts to ask for the syllabus so you could begin readings. – Make sure you introduce yourself to the professor and TA’s during the first class. – Sit in place in the classroom / lecture hall where you will be able to focus. – Ask questions, and participate in class!
  • Proactive and frequent use of peers on campus Behavior: Strategy 3 • Friend groups are typically composed of people who have similar interests, personalities, senses of humor, among other traits. Have you ever considered using your friends as an academic resource? If not, this would be a good resource to start using. • Find out what your friends majors and minors are, and what their academic strengths and weaknesses are. Ask to study with them in one of their strength areas and observe their studying process. Studying with another student can teach you several things: – (1) This can help catch you up on any content you may have missed or did not understand during class. – (2) You may learn a new method of studying which you can incorporate into studying for your other courses.
  • Behavior: Strategy 4 Taking advantage of the resources @ UCONN • One of the many advantages of going to a university such as Uconn is the various support centers in place to assist students with their academics. • Listed below are some of the main support centers on campus available to you: – Academic services center, CLAS – Academic Achievement Center • Uconn Connects – Writing Center – Q-Center – Counseling Center
  • CLAS, Academic Services Center • What is it? – The ASC is an arm of the CLAS Dean’s office. The staff and advisors in the ASC serve students and faculty in CLAS through: • Academic Advising • Implementing and informing students of academic regulations and policies • Providing trainings and outreach • Advise and run the orientation process • How could it help me? – The academic advisors at CLAS can help students with a variety of questions or concerns. For example, if a student has a question about general education requirement course, graduation requirements, academic probation or dismissal or any other academic question, the ASC is the office to contact. • How do I get involved? – To make an appointment: Call (860) 486-2822 – www.clasadvising.uconn.edu Behavior: Strategy 4
  • Academic Achievement Center (AAC) Behavior: Strategy 4 • What is it? – The AAC is a center that all students can utilize on campus to receive academic coaching in a number of areas. In addition, the AAC also runs academic workshops, tutoring and the Uconn Connects program. • How could it help me? – The AAC provides coaching in the following areas: study skills, note taking techniques, time management, goal setting, stress management, procrastination and exam preparation. • How do I get involved? – Feel free to stop in the AAC offices anytime, ROWE room 217. – Or, visit the website for more information: http://web.uconn.edu/uconnconnects/AAC.htm
  • Writing Center • What is it? – The writing center offers individualized tutoring sessions that can assist you in any stage of the writing process. • How could it help me? – The writing center could help you improve the grades on your papers, prepare for an essay exam, understand MLA citation use, to name just a few things they do. • How can I get involved? – Go to the web page: – http://www.writingcenter.uconn.edu – Click on make an appointment and follow the instructions online.
  • Q- Center • What is it? – The “Q” or Quantitative Learning Center is a resource available to students to assist them in quantitative classes. • The ‘Q’ center offers: – General Review sessions – Downloadable Resources – Group and individual tutoring • How could it help me? – If you are in a quantitative course and need some additional assistance, the Q center is a tremendous resource . • How do I get involved? • Go to the website – and choose which option you would like to get involved in. • http://qcenter.uconn.edu/index.php •
  • Counseling Services • What is it? – Uconn counseling services offers individual counseling to students who are experiencing social and emotional difficulties. • How could it help me? – Talking with a counselor about stress or anxiety related to academic performance has been show in the research to be a successful practice of students who succeed academically. • How do I get involved? – To make an appointment: Call (860) 486-4705
  • Self Regulation of Behavior SELF REGULATION Self Regulation of Cognition Self Regulation of Motivation and Affect
  • (2) Self regulation of motivation and affect • Involves controlling and changing motivational beliefs such as self-efficacy and goal orientation, so that students can adapt to the demands of the course. In addition, students can learn to control their emotions and affect in ways that improve their learning (NRC/GT).
  • What does this mean? • Change from: • I don’t know if I can accomplish this task. • Change to: • I can accomplish this task. • This class is a waste of time, I can’t learn math. • Math is challenging, but I’ll put extra work into this class. • I’m not going to try to get a good grade in this course. • I’m setting a goal grade of a B for this course.
  • M&A: Strategy 1 How do you change your attitudes? Decrease self doubt Increase self efficacy
  • M&A: Strategy 1 What is Self Efficacy? • Self-efficacy is one’s judgment of one’s capability per perform given activities. • "Perceived self-efficacy is defined as people's judgments of their capabilities to organize and execute courses of action required to attain designated types of performances. It is concerned not with the skills one has but with judgments of what one can do with whatever skills one possesses." Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hill.
  • M&A: Strategy 1 Self-efficacy influences… • What activities we select • How much effort we put forth • How persistent we are in the face of difficulties • The difficulty of goals we set
  • High self efficacy M&A: Strategy 1 More likely to attempt new and harder tasks. More likely to avoid trying a new or difficult task. Work harder. Low self efficacy Persist longer in the face of difficulties.
  • M&A: Strategy 1 Examples of how to increase your self efficacy • If you have struggled with a task previously and are not optimistic about your chances of successfully completing the task, break it into smaller pieces. • Example: Student A has struggled with English papers since entering college, and is anxious because he/she has a 10 page paper due in a week. Student A received advice to break this larger assignment down into a series of smaller assignments so he/she would not feel overwhelmed.
  • M&A: Strategy 1 Example continued • Student A broke down the paper process in the following way: – Task 1: create a thesis statement – Task 2: send thesis statement to professor – Task 3: make a detailed outline of the paper • Find quotes from the text – – – – – – – Task 4: write 2 pages Task 5: write 2 pages Task 6: write 2 pages Task 7: write 2 pages Task 8: write 2 pages Task 9: re-read whole paper Task 10: edit paper
  • M&A: Strategy 1 Example continued….. • Why does this raise a persons self efficacy? – Several reasons! – (1) breaking a large task into smaller tasks makes the ‘large task’ seem less overwhelming, and gives a person a definite starting point where they can begin working on the task. – (2) When a student successfully completes one of the smaller tasks their confidence in their ability to complete the next task will increase (in other words, they are developing self efficacy).
  • M&A: Strategy 2 Setting long term and short term goals. GOAL SETTING
  • M&A: Strategy 2 Why is it important to have a goal? • Goals motivate you to take action and push yourself outside your comfort zone.
  • M&A: Strategy 2 2 types of goals • Short term goals: – Achieved more quickly and thus result in higher motivation and better self regulation than distant goals (for example, setting the goal of running a 5K vs. a marathon). • Long term goals: – Eventual outcomes that you want to achieve. – Short term goals should build up to one or more long term goals. – Needs to be a challenge but still achievable.
  • Self Regulation of Behavior SELF REGULATION Self Regulation of Cognition Self Regulation of Motivation and Affect
  • (3) Self regulation of cognition • Involves the control of various cognitive strategies for learning, such as the use of deep processing strategies that result in better learning and performance than students showed previously. • What cognitive strategies have you used in college?
  • Cognitive: Strategy 1 Processing your actions Forethought Action Reflection
  • Processing your actions Cognitive: Strategy 1 Forethought • What is forethought? – Forethought involves an individual thinking ahead to the action or actions they need to accomplish and cognitively planning how they are going to complete the tasks. • Forethought typically involves two processes: – Task analysis, which could involve setting a goal or creating a strategic plan. – Self-motivational beliefs, which could involve self efficacy, setting outcome expectations, and setting goal orientation.
  • Processing your actions Cognitive: Strategy 1 Action • What is action? – The action phase involves the individual using the planning and goals from the forethought stage to follow through with the task at hand. • Action typically involves two processes: – Self-control, which involves an individual providing ongoing instruction to him or herself, attention focusing or refocusing, and specific task strategies. – Self observation, which involves an individual recording or experimenting with the process they are using.
  • Processing your actions Cognitive: Strategy 1 Reflection • What is reflection? – The reflection phase involves the individual taking a metaphorical “step back” and assessing what was successful, and what could be improved about the action that was taken. • Reflection typically involves: – Self evaluation, which involves an individual critically examining the success or failure of an action or set of actions and thinking about what could be improved, or what should remain the same.
  • Cognitive: Strategy 1 Example… • A transfer student to Uconn has decided to become a biology major with the hopes of going to medical school after graduation. The student has spoken with several Bio professors, and they suggested that he/she try to transfer into BIO 1107 immediately, even though the student has missed the first week of class.
  • Cognitive: Strategy 1 Example… Forethought • What forethought would be involved in this students decision making process? – Task analysis: • Setting a goal grade to achieve in the biology class. • Creating a plan of how to catch up on work that the student missed in the first week of class, and then setting a plan for how to stay on top of work for biology for the rest of the semester. – Self-motivational beliefs: • Having high academic self efficacy. If student begins to doubt self, using self-efficacy strategies and breaking assignments into smaller tasks. • Orientation goal: being aware that to go to medical school, this class is necessary.
  • Example… Action Cognitive: Strategy 1 • What action would be involved in this students decision making process? – Self Control: • The student would need to create a set of instructions or guidelines to follow when studying for biology. • The student would also have to develop some new study strategies that could help him/her succeed in biology. He/she may acquire these by asking other students in the class what they do, or by asking the professor or TA for advice. – Self Observation: • Student will being studying at new times during the day (for example from 7-9am or 6-8pm) to accommodate increased work load.
  • Processing your actions Cognitive: Strategy 1 Reflection • What reflection would be involved in this students decision making process? – Self evaluation: • Self evaluation may take place after the semester in biology has concluded. The student would examine and evaluate how the different actions he/she took worked, and what he/she can do to improve for subsequent semesters of science courses.
  • Create a problem solving model Cognitive: Strategy 2 • You are going to run into problematic situations in college, whether, they are academic, personal, social or environmental. Knowing how to effectively problem solve will help you successfully overcome your dilemma and refocus on tasks that require your attention.
  • Create a problem solving model Cognitive: Strategy 2 • (1) Analyze your goal: – Be clear about what you want to achieve. – Ask yourself how you want the situation to look when the problem is resolved. • (2) Identify the problem: – Determine the source of the problem, why is this source creating a problem? – Clearly identify what needs to change. Imagine how the situation will look without the problem. • (3) Identify possible solutions: – There can be numerous solutions to the same problem. The best solution is the one you are willing to take action on. – Think about different actions you can take to solve the problem, create several scenarios in your mind. – Determine the positive and negative outcomes of all of your potential solutions. (Szarlan, Singha & Brown, 2011)
  • Cognitive: Strategy 2 Create a problem solving model • (4) Prioritize the possible solutions: – Decide which option is the best for solving the problem, and choose your second and third options. • (5) Decide on the best solution: – Choose the action you will take to resolve the problem. This decision should be based on objective information that will affect the outcome. • (6) Act on your solution – Carry out your planned solution. Until you take some sort of action, the problem will remain a problem. (Szarlan, Singha & Brown, 2011)
  • WRAP-UP:
  • What are the benefits of being a selfregulated learner? • Reduced stress related to academics • The strategies become habits, which makes them easier to apply and use • A sense of control over your academic career • The ability to tackle complex tasks without feeling overwhelmed
  • To complete this module: • • • • • Review the full PPT Take assessment 1 Complete assignment 1 View mini-videos Complete post-survey