Rif And First Book

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Two National Book Distribution programs in the US. Presented and an IFLA Satellite on National Reading Programs in Rome, Italy. August 2009

Two National Book Distribution programs in the US. Presented and an IFLA Satellite on National Reading Programs in Rome, Italy. August 2009

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  • Here is a map of Brooklyn NY USA My home town
  • Books, to the reading child, are so much more than books – they are dreams and knowledge, they are a future, and a past. ~ Esther Meynell ~ (1940)
  • Reading is Fundamental and First Book Two Successful Literacy Partnership Models
  • Sing out for books The paper bread That feeds the hungry In the head. Nibble a mystery Swallow a star Sip honeysong Wherever you are. Drink of adventure Gobble the past Now it´s the time And it goes so fast Taste of tomorrow Slice science thin The better to savor The world we're in. Salt the villain Pepper the fakes, Chew the poets, Fork the rakes. Relish words They´ve much to tell. Feast on the earth Where heroes fell ... Sing out for books ! Children’s Book Week 1965 Attributed to Erza Jack Keats
  • A recent study shows that while in middle income neighborhoods the ratio of books per child is 13 to 1, in low-income neighborhoods, the ratio is 1 age-appropriate book for every 300 children. - Neuman, Susan B. and David K. Dickinson, ed. Handbook of Early Literacy Research, Volume 2. New York, NY: 2006, p. 31. 68% of students who had three or more different types of reading materials at home performed at the Proficient level, while students who had two or fewer types of reading material at home performed at the Basic level. Students who had 4 types of reading material at home performed the highest. -Donahue, P. L., A. D. Finnegan, and N. L. Lutkus, The Nation's Report Card: Fourth-Grade Reading 2001 (PDF file) , U.S. Department of Education, NCES, Washington, DC 2001.
  • 41% of fourth grade boys, and 35% of fourth grade girls read below the basic level, and in low-income urban schools this figure approaches 70% - U.S. Department of Education. Office of Educational Research and Improvement. National Center for Education Statistics. The NAEP 1998 Reading Report Card for the Nation Children entering kindergarten with elementary math and reading skills are the most likely to do well in school later, even if they have various social and emotional problems. - Northwestern University. "Early Academic Skills, Not Behavior, Best Predict School Success." ScienceDaily 19 November 2007. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071112182442.htm
  • Child Literacy in the US Across the nation just under half of children between birth and five years (47.8%) are read to every day by their parents or other family members. - Russ S, Perez V, Garro N, Klass P, Kuo AA, Gershun M, Halfon N, Zuckerman B. Reading Across the Nation: A Chartbook (2007): Reach Out and Read National Center, Boston, MA. By the age of 2, children who are read to regularly display greater language comprehension, larger vocabularies, and higher cognitive skills than their peers. - Raikes, H., Pan, B.A., Luze, G.J., Tamis-LeMonda, C.S., Brooks-Gunn, J., Constantine, J., Tarullo, L.B., Raikes, H.A., Rodriguez, E. (2006). “Mother-child book reading in low-income families: Correlates and outcomes during the first three years of life.” Child Development , 77(4).
  • The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study found that in the spring of 2000, the children who were read to at least three times a week by a family member were almost twice as likely to score in the top 25% in reading compared to children who were read to less than 3 times a week. - Denton, Kristen and Gerry West, Children's Reading and Mathematics Achievement in Kindergarten and First Grade (PDF file) , U.S. Department of Education, NCES, Washington, DC, 2002. Nearly 2/3 of US families living in poverty have no books of their own
  • “ Access to books and educational material is the single biggest barrier to literacy development in the United States and beyond. If we can solve the problem of access, we will be well on the road to realizing educational parity – a goal which has eluded this country for generations.” - Susan B. Neuman, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Center for Improvement of Early Reading Achievement
  • RIF is READING IS FUNDAMENTAL AND FIRST BOOK
  • THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE In American we have no history of a single, nationwide, centrally managed reading initiative Individuals saw the need to place books in the hand and homes of children Developed ad hoc responses Decision to to professionalize the programs Work to develop reliable funding (Federal, Corporate, etc) Local community based organizations and institutions are key partners. It is THEY (NOT the national. Parent organizations) that plan, sustain and deliver programs…and books!
  • RIF Reading is Fundamental
  • Founded in 1966 Former teacher Margaret McNamara wife of now Late Secretary of Defense Robert F McNamera In 1966, former teacher Margaret McNamara brought a bag of used books to four boys in Washington, D.C., whom she tutored in reading. When she told the children they could each pick out a book to keep, their astonishment and delight led her to discover that these children, and many of their classmates, had never owned any books. By that summer, Mrs. McNamara had gathered a group of school volunteers, and on November 3, 1966, they launched the book distribution and reading motivation program they called Reading Is Fundamental. From November 1966 through the early 1970s, RIF expanded from a pilot project at three elementary schools in Washington, D.C., to a program reaching children in 60 of the city's public schools.
  • When I look back, I am so impressed again with the life-giving power of literature.  If I were a young person today, trying to gain a sense ofmyself in the world, I would do that again by reading, just as I did when I was young. ~ Maya Angelou ~
  • Proudly celebrating 15 years of RIF, the Estill County Board of Education RIF Program is championed by 2009 VOYA recipient Elrene “Elke” Davis. For a recent group of visitors, Elke shared an authentic Appalachian read-aloud, made a special RIF book delivery to scores of happy 3rd-graders, held a book distribution at Clifford the Big Red Dog’s house, and introduce them to generations of RIF kids. By day’s end, they had visited four schools and heard countless stories of fun literacy moments from a large and enthusiastic group of teachers, school administrators, RIF kids, and RIF volunteers. Elke clearly loves books and shares her passion with the whole community.
  • RIFs Mission Statement Ensure that every child believes in the value of books and the importance of reading. Assist children and their families with the fundamental resources children need to become motivated to read. Lead in the creation and development of national, regional and local collaborations building strong community-based children’s and family literacy programs. 
  • RIF PROGRAM BUILDING BLOCKS Always provide books for children to explore and keep. Always involve volunteers in children's reading. (More than a third of our volunteers are parents.) Always use imaginative activities to spark a child's desire to read. Keep it simple=Success Book Ownership is Fundamental Reading Motivational Activities are Required VOLUNTERS are key Family Involvement in Reading is Essential for Every Child’s Literacy
  • Barbara, a 2009 RIF Volunteer of the year, coordinates the RIF program with the Delta Lambda chapter and leads 90 volunteers, many of whom are retired, back into the classroom three times a year for RIF. Group members pride themselves on making sure every classroom from kindergarten to grade 3 has a great book read aloud on distribution day. The excitement of these read-alouds was felt when a 2nd-grade class at Del Rey Woods Elementary didn’’t take their eyes off of the reader.
  • RIF provides 4.6 million children with 16 million new, free books and literacy resources each year 75% of the cost of most books are covered by Federal Funds (US Department of Education) administered by RIF
  • RIF OFFERS AND MANGAES A VARIETY OF PROGRAMS Books for Ownership Running Start Books on the Menu Shared Beginnings Family of Readers Care to Read Reading Planet Read for Change Multicultural Initiative Leading to Reading ¡Leamos en familia!
  • 1975, the U.S. Congress created the "Inexpensive Book Distribution Program"  (IBDP) 34 years of federal matching funds  to sites that qualify for RIF's national book program
  • RIF is delivered and managed by community volunteers in every state and U.S. territory Schools, Public Libraries, Community Based Organizations Some groups are already in existence Some group are organized around the opportunity that a Grant for a RIF program offers RIFNet produces professional development programs that provide important information about how to motivate children to read and how to promote literacy for more than 435,000 literacy volunteers at 23,000 sites nationwide. (RIFNet is funded through a Star Schools grant).
  • Though RIF is mainly funded by the US Department off Education Corporate sponsorships are key Two ways that corporations partner with RIF: RIF Book Suppliers offer books at deep discounts to local RIF Programs (Scholastic, etc.) Longstanding history with RIF Some are new and reflect greater cultural diversity in content and language choices RIF funds come from Corporate partners which often run local and national fund raising activities and promotions co-branded with RIF Volunteers from the Corporations
  • Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) stole the show at the 25th Annual Miami Book Fair International! RIF opened the festival with a tent that created a “Reading Jungle.” Complete with parrots, vines, and palms, RIF conducted bilingual read-alouds of The Parrot Tico Tango/El Loro Tico Tango by Anne Witte and Wild About Books by Judy Sierra in a “jungle reading corner.” After the readings, children were given a free book and created puppets of their favorite character from the story .
  • A house without books is like a room without windows. No man has a right to bring up his children without surrounding them with books, if he has the means to buy them
  • Book ownership: Children have the opportunity to choose and keep two to five books per year at no cost to the children or their families. Fun literacy-related activities: Reading really is FUNdamental in Books for Ownership. Volunteers motivate children to read with a myriad of  festive book activities that accompany each book event. Family and community involvement: RIF headquarters provides training and technical assistance to enable program coordinators to recruit and train volunteers , who help run their Books for Ownership services.
  • RIF’S SIGNATURE AND MOST WELL KNOW PROGRAM? The National Book Program is the oldest and largest of RIF's programs and now known as BOOKS FOR OWNERSHIP Book ownership: Children have the opportunity to choose and keep two to five books per year at no cost to the children or their families. Fun literacy-related activities: Reading really is FUNdamental in Books for Ownership. Volunteers motivate children to read with a myriad of festive book activities that accompany each book event. Family and community involvement: RIF headquarters provides training and technical assistance to enable program coordinators to recruit and train volunteers, who help run their Books for Ownership service. Books for Ownership reaches young people of all ages in a variety of settings, including schools, community centers, Boys & Girls Clubs, migrant labor camps, churches, hospitals, and health clinics. The program operates in 25,000 sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories, and has been licensed in countries such as the United Kingdom and Argentina. Goals provide new, free books to children motivate children to read, generate community support for literacy Distributed over 250 million books to children.
  • Reaches young people of all ages in a variety of settings, including schools, libraries , community centers, Boys & Girls Clubs, migrant labor camps, churches, hospitals, and health clinics. The program currently operates in 25,000 sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories RIF has gone global ; now licensed in countries such as the United Kingdom and Argentina.
  • Running Start School based Strong parent involvement is essential for program success Motivational program for first graders (6-7 year olds) Builds on the excitement of first grade, when ‘real’ reading takes hold Parents’ expectations for success are high Challenges students to read 21 books in 8-10 weeks. Goal is for parents to give children a burst of ambition at a crucial stage in their development as readers.
  • Books on the menu is an example of a student-to-student mentoring programs Most often school -based A peer to peer program with a strong track record of success Older children are paired with younger children as “book-mates". Increase the amount of time students spend reading and discussing books. Also, by building relationships between older and younger children, the confidence and self-esteem of the older child is increased.
  • Shared Beginnings Shared Beginnings is a program for both parent and child. Shared Beginnings helps young parents develop their children's early language and literacy skills. Parents are encouraged to read to their children, and the program conveys the importance of "nurturing" literacy. Parents receive practice in activities meant to foster early learning skills, thus giving them the confidence they need to continue to teach their children. Parents are excited by their children's learning and proud of their own achievement FREE BOOKS AND VOLUTEER SUPPORT ARE KEY
  • RIF FAMILY OF READERS Focuses on developing Family reading habits Seeks to enhance the time families spend reading together
  • http://www.rif.org/readforchange/ Inspired by President Obama’s new Volunteer Initiative United We Serve http://www.serve.gov/ GOAL= Log over 3 million minutes of reading with kids by September 11, 2009—the National Day of Service and Remembrance Raise awareness of the impact of children’s illiteracy on the long term economic health of America First Book is an organizational partner in this effort as well as the PTA and Communities in Schools
  • RIF Reading Planet for KidsKids ages 6-15 can sign in and join Reading Planet Kid Friendly Design 24/7 Interactive website for reading promotion Area include: Activities, BookZone, Game Station and an area for kids to post their thoughts and writing Videos and online stories Kids can keep a reading log and a reading wish list
  • RIF’s Multicultural Literacy Campaign Begun in 2007 ; Multi-year initiative Targeted effort to promote and support early childhood literacy in African-American, Hispanic and American Indian communities Spokespersons and educational leaders Essay by Dr. Rudine Simms Bishop of OSU Visible corporate partners that have strong cachet within the communities UNIVISION, RadioOne , Native America Calling, Koahnic (Native American Radio)
  • Reading Is Fundamental | Leading to Reading Home For Preschoolers (ages 0-5) and their parents Animated characters, Rita and Riffy , guide users Bilingual (English and Spanish versions of same content) Simple design for low literacy adults
  • New Bilingual site specifically designed for Latino families Areas highlight early literacy activities: shared reading, singing, sharing stories…together as a family
  • Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) stole the show at the 25th Annual Miami Book Fair International! RIF opened the festival with a tent that created a “Reading Jungle.” Complete with parrots, vines, and palms, RIF conducted bilingual read-alouds of The Parrot Tico Tango/El Loro Tico Tango by Anne Witte and Wild About Books by Judy Sierra in a “jungle reading corner.” After the readings, children were given a free book and created puppets of their favorite character from the story .
  • RIF by the Numbers RIF provides 4.6 million children with 16 million new, free books and literacy resources each year. 75% of the cost of most books are covered by Federal Funds
  • Building BlocksO Children always choose Free Books for their very own home ‘library’ Motivational, celebratory, reading/literacy enhancement activities must be part of every RIF Book Program Program partners (publishers/vendors) offer books to RIF groups at deep discounts; fundraising and matching Volunteer support (community and businesses) is key Literacy research and training support for RIF Coordinators and Volunteers and now…Parents National branding and marketing opportunities for corporate and/or nonprofit partners
  • MY BOOK! I did it!  Come and look At what I’ve done! I read a book!  When someone wrote it Long ago For me to read, How did he know That this was the book I’d take from the shelf And lie on the floor And read by myself? I really read it! Just like that! Word by word,  From first to last! I’m sleeping with This book in bed, This first FIRST book I’ve ever read! By ~ David L. Harrison ~ (from Somebody Catch My Homework )
  • FIRST BOOK DO YOU REMEMBER THE MAGIC OF YOUR FIRST BOOK?
  • First Book Beginnings First Book was founded in 1992 --almost 25 years after RIF First Book has a much more corporate, social venture capital approach to creating and delivering product and value. First Book provides new books to children in need addressing one of the most important factors affecting literacy – access to books. The inspiration for the organization was born when Kyle Zimmer, a corporate lawyer by day and tutor at an inner-city soup kitchen by night, discovered that the children she tutored had no books to read. Kyle discovered that the majority of programs reaching low-income populations have few, if any, age-appropriate books for the children they serve. She realized that there were millions of potential readers, future workers, citizens and parents, who were eager to love reading and learning, but were without the tools to do so. Spurred to action, Kyle left her day job and in 1992 founded First Book to provide new books and resources to the children who needed them the most. In that first year, First Book distributed 12,000 books in three communities
  • First Book Vision Statement “ First Book envisions a world where all children have an enriched learning environment with new books and educational resources of their own.”
  • National Book Bank (FBNBB) Advisory Boards and Volunteers at all levels Entrepreneurial; employs a business model Strong emphasis on marketing and creating mutually beneficial nonprofit/for profit partnerships Strong Web 2.0 presence and web sales/marketing Research on literacy and data that documents First Book program effectiveness Training and resources for volunteers
  • Advisory Board are at the HEART of FIRST BOOK Select programs to receive book grants Raise funds to support the purchase of new books for the children in these programs. Recruit other members who represent a professional and cultural cross-section of the community.
  • The First Book National Book Bank (FBNBB) is a centralized distribution system for large-scale donations of children’s books from publishers to programs serving children in need. The FBNBB distributes millions of books annually, working with warehousing partners and with support from volunteer networks. FBNBB was created in 1999 and is now supported by donations from more than 50 publishers. The largest single donation to the FBNBB was 1.9 million books from Random House in 2005. The largest single distribution of the FBNBB was 2 million books in 2002.
  • First Book Book Relief FB Support for Gulf Coast communities affected by Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma 5.1 million books distributed over 2 years
  • First Book is Entrepreneurial Corporate root of its founder (like Room to Read—founded by a former Microsoft Exceutive) Saw the benefit of creating an online store to service their local FB Advsiory Boards , their programs, and other literacy programs “… an online store selling high-quality children's books and educational materials at deeply discounted prices to organizations serving children from low-income families.”
  • First Book Connects Volunteers Web 2.0 employed for peer to peer volunteer recruitment and support Web 2.0 methods for grassroots marketing of program and fundraising
  • Like RIF-- FIRST BOOK IS DEDICATED TO DEVELOPING AND PROMULGATING RESEARCH IN READING AND LITERACY Maintains a valuable resource site Literacy in the United States Useful for FB Advisory Boards and volunteers, corporate partners, educators, librarians
  • First Book works closely with its network of corporate partners to develop new and innovative ways to use private sector strategies for the public good. First Book receives more than 80% of its funding from cause-based marketing campaigns developed in partnership with some of America's leading corporations and organizations. Our award-winning cause-related marketing campaigns are as diverse as our partners and are recognized as the best in the business. Combining the power of First Book's print, online, and retail partnerships with the ability to host localized events in more than 300 markets, First Book implements multi-dimensional campaigns that drive traffic, increase sales, and build brand awareness for First Book's partners while raising money to fund new books for children from low-income families.  By leveraging the effectiveness of its proven model, First Book builds and supports its Advisory Board network, and raises money to provide millions of new books each year.
  • First Book By The Numbers In its 17 th Year 60 million brand new books to children Hundreds of Communities Nationwide The largest single distribution of the FBNBB was 2 million books in 2002 First Book delivered approximately 8 Million books in 2008 Largest single donation? 1.9 million books; Random House in 2005
  • First Book Building Blocks Children receive the FIRST and/or Free Books for their very own home ‘library’ Advisory Groups are central; corporate and volunteer support is built in to the programs Books from NBB are sold to FB Advisory Groups at deep discounts; fundraising and matching funds Heavy emphasis on national branding and marketing opportunities for corporate and/or nonprofit partners Leverages literacy research for “cause marketing” and training support Uses Web 2.0 tools for marketing and recruitment
  • Many things we need can wait. The child cannot. Now is the time his bones are formed, his mind developed. To him we cannot say tomorrow, his name is today." ~Gabriela Mistral ~
  • The Center for Summer Learning at Johns Hopkins University http://www.sum merlearning.org/ Simple ‘doable’ solutions for parents and how to slow the ‘summer slide’ Storybook Corner on the Harvard Family Research Project Site http://www.hfrp.org/ Reading Rockets http://www.readingrockets.org/ offers support for struggling and reluctant readers Center for Family Literacy http://www.famlit.org/ The 2008 Kids and Family Reading Report: Reading in the 21 st Century (sponsored by Scholastic and Yankelovich Research) International Reading http://www.reading.org/
  • Collaborative Summer Library Program CSLP Cooperative A collaborative public web site managed by NYC’s Tri-Li Brooklyn New York and Queens Library to support summer reading for all ages http://www.summerreading.org/ Develop/share research on the impact of summer reading and “summer set-back” IMLS supported study on impact of Summer Reading ( Dominican University )
  • B ooks to the ceiling, Books to the sky. My pile of books Are a mile high. How I love them! How I need them! I'll have a long beard By the time I read them. ~ Arnold Lobel ~
  • Thank You! Further Questions? Please contact: Barbara A. Genco, MLS Editor, Collection Management, Library Journal Visiting Associate Professor Pratt Institute School of Library and Information Science Brooklyn (New York), USA [email_address]
  • Ciao from Brooklyn!

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2.
    • Books, to the reading child, are so much more than books –
    • they are dreams and knowledge,
    • they are a future, and a past.
    • ~ Esther Meynell ~ (1940)
  • 3. Barbara A. Genco, MLS, Editor, Collection Management, Library Journal Visiting Associate Professor Pratt Institute School of Library and Information Science, Brooklyn (New York), USA [email_address] Reading is Fundamental and First Book Two Successful Literacy Partnership Models
  • 4. Sing out for books!
    • Sing out for books
    • The paper bread
    • That feeds the hungry
    • In the head.
    • Nibble a mystery
    • Swallow a star
    • Sip honeysong
    • Wherever you are.
    • Drink of adventure
    • Gobble the past
    • Now it´s the time
    • And it goes so fast.
    • Taste of tomorrow
    • Slice science thin
    • The better to savor
    • The world we're in.
    • Salt the villain
    • Pepper the fakes,
    • Chew the poets,
    • Fork the rakes.
    • Relish words
    • They´ve much to tell.
    • Feast on the earth
    • Where heroes fell ...
    • Sing out for books !
    • Children’s Book Week 1965
    • Attributed to Erza Jack Keats
  • 5. Research on US Literacy
    • A recent study shows that while in middle income neighborhoods the ratio of books per child is 13 to 1, in low-income neighborhoods, the ratio is 1 age-appropriate book for every 300 children. - Neuman, Susan B. and David K. Dickinson, ed. Handbook of Early Literacy Research, Volume 2. New York, NY: 2006, p. 31.
    • 68% of students who had three or more different types of reading materials at home performed at the Proficient level, while students who had two or fewer types of reading material at home performed at the Basic level. Students who had 4 types of reading material at home performed the highest. - Donahue, P. L., A. D. Finnegan, and N. L. Lutkus, The Nation's Report Card: Fourth-Grade Reading 2001 (PDF file) , U.S. Department of Education, NCES, Washington, DC 2001.
  • 6. Research on US Literacy con’t
    • 41% of fourth grade boys, and 35% of fourth grade girls read below the basic level, and in low-income urban schools this figure approaches 70% - U.S. Department of Education. Office of Educational Research and Improvement. National Center for Education Statistics. The NAEP 1998 Reading Report Card for the Nation
    • Children entering kindergarten with elementary math and reading skills are the most likely to do well in school later, even if they have various social and emotional problems. - Northwestern University. "Early Academic Skills, Not Behavior, Best Predict School Success." ScienceDaily 19 November 2007. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071112182442.htm
  • 7. Child Literacy in the US
    • Across the nation just under half of children between birth and five years (47.8%) are read to every day by their parents or other family members. - Russ S, Perez V, Garro N, Klass P, Kuo AA, Gershun M, Halfon N, Zuckerman B. Reading Across the Nation: A Chartbook (2007): Reach Out and Read National Center, Boston, MA.
    • By the age of 2, children who are read to regularly display greater language comprehension, larger vocabularies, and higher cognitive skills than their peers. - Raikes, H., Pan, B.A., Luze, G.J., Tamis-LeMonda, C.S., Brooks-Gunn, J., Constantine, J., Tarullo, L.B., Raikes, H.A., Rodriguez, E. (2006). “Mother-child book reading in low-income families: Correlates and outcomes during the first three years of life.” Child Development , 77(4).
  • 8. Child Literacy in the US con’t
    • The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study found that in the spring of 2000, the children who were read to at least three times a week by a family member were almost twice as likely to score in the top 25% in reading compared to children who were read to less than 3 times a week. - Denton, Kristen and Gerry West, Children's Reading and Mathematics Achievement in Kindergarten and First Grade (PDF file) , U.S. Department of Education, NCES, Washington, DC, 2002.
    • Nearly 2/3 of US families living in poverty have no books of their own
  • 9. “ Access to books and educational material is the single biggest barrier to literacy development in the United States and beyond. If we can solve the problem of access, we will be well on the road to realizing educational parity – a goal which has eluded this country for generations.” - Susan B. Neuman, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Center for Improvement of Early Reading Achievement
  • 10. http://www.rif.org/ http://www.firstbook.org/
  • 11. The American Experience
    • No history of a single, nationwide, centrally managed reading initiative
    • Individuals saw the need
    • Developed ad hoc responses
    • Decision to professionalize the programs
    • Sought reliable funding streams
    • Developed strong financial and professional partnerships
    • Local community based organizations are key partners in these enterprises
  • 12.  
  • 13. RIF = Reading Is Fundamental
    • Founded in 1966
    • Former teacher Margaret McNamara
    • Few children owned own books
    • November 1966 through the early 1970s, RIF expanded to 60 DC public schools
    • Largest children’s literacy program in the US
  • 14.
    • When I look back,
    • I am so impressed again with the life-giving power of literature. 
    • If I were a young person today, trying
    • to gain a sense of myself in the world,
    • I would do that again by reading, just as I did when I was young.
    • ~ Maya Angelou ~
  • 15. RIF Comes to Appalachia
    • A Librarian acts when too many kids couldn’t participate in school Book Fairs
    • http://www.rif.org/maps/
  • 16. RIF’s Mission Statement
    • Ensure that every child believes in the value of books and the importance of reading.
    • Assist children and their families with the fundamental resources children need to become motivated to read.
    • Lead in the creation and development of national, regional and local collaborations building strong community-based children’s and family literacy programs. 
  • 17. RIF Program Building Blocks
    • Always provide books for children to explore and keep.
    • Always involve volunteers in children's reading. (More than a third of RIF Program volunteers are parents.)
    • Always use imaginative activities to spark a child's desire to read.
  • 18. A RIF EVENT IN ACTION
    • Librarians return to school on California’s Monterey Coast to Volunteer for RIF
    • RIF MAP 2.0
  • 19. RIF… By The Numbers
    • RIF provides 4.6 million children with 16 million new, free books and literacy resources each year
    • 75% of the cost of most books are covered by Federal Funds (US Department of Education) administered by RIF
  • 20. RIF Programs & Services
    • Books for Ownership
    • Running Start
    • Books on the Menu
    • Shared Beginnings
    • Family of Readers
    • Care to Read
    • Reading Planet
    • Read for Change
    • Multicultural Initiative
    • Leading to Reading
    • ¡Leamos en familia!
  • 21. US Federal Funding for RIF
    • 1975, the U.S. Congress created the "Inexpensive Book Distribution Program"  (IBDP)
    • 34 years of federal matching funds  to sites that qualify for RIF's Books for Ownership program
  • 22. RIF is Volunteer Driven
    • RIF relies on community volunteers in every state and U.S. territory
    • You can see successful RIF Programs and Volunteers in action by sampling these videos from selected programs on the map http://www.rif.org/maps/
    • Schools, Public Libraries, Community Based Organizations are typical partners
    • RIFNet offers resources, distance learning and professional development programs for RIF adult leaders
  • 23. RIF’s Corporate Partnerships
    • RIF Book Suppliers offer books at deep discounts to local RIF Programs (Scholastic, etc.)
    • RIF Partners have included Colgate, Target, Macy’s, Sacks Fifth Avenue, Mercedes Benz
    • Partners contribute funds and volunteer hours
  • 24. RIF Corporate Partner — Macy’s
    • RIF has an exciting and active presence at the annual Miami International Book Fair with the help of Macy’s --the department store chain
    • RIF MAP 2.0
  • 25.
    • “ A house without books is like a room without windows.
    • No man has a right to bring up his children without surrounding them with books, if he has the means to buy them.”
    • Horace Mann
    • 19 th C American Educator
  • 26. RIF Building Blocks
    • Book ownership: Children have the opportunity to choose and keep two to five books per year at no cost to the children or their families.
    • Fun literacy-related activities: Reading really is FUNdamental in Books for Ownership. Volunteers motivate children to read with a myriad of  festive book activities that accompany each book event.
    • Family and community involvement: RIF headquarters provides training and technical assistance to enable program coordinators to recruit and train volunteers , who help run their Books for Ownership services.
  • 27. RIF’s Books for Ownership
    • Formerly the National Book Program
    • The oldest and largest of RIF's programs
    • RIF’s ‘marquee’ program
    • Goals
        • provide new, free books to children
        • motivate children to read
        • generate community support for literacy
    • Distributed over 250 million books to children
  • 28. More on Books for Ownership
    • Reaches young people of all ages in a variety of settings, including schools, libraries , community centers, Boys & Girls Clubs, migrant labor camps, churches, hospitals, and health clinics.
    • The program currently operates in 25,000 sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories
    • RIF has gone global ; now licensed in countries such as the United Kingdom and Argentina.
  • 29. RIF’s Running Start
    • Reading motivation program for first graders (6-7 year olds)
    • Builds on the excitement of first grade , when ‘real’ reading takes hold
    • Parents’ expectations for success are high when kids are at this stage
    • Challenges students to read 21 books in 8-10 weeks .
    • Goal is for parents to give children a burst of ambition and measurable successes at a crucial stage in their development as readers
    • Partners are most often schools
  • 30. RIF’s Books on the Menu
    • Student-to-student mentoring programs
    • Older children are paired with younger children as “book-mates”
    • Aim is to significantly increase the amount of time students spend reading and discussing books
    • Skills of younger children improve
    • By building relationships between older and younger children, the confidence and self-esteem of the older child is increased
    • Both groups of ‘at-risk’ children (mentors/mentees) gain skills and experience success
  • 31. RIF’s Shared Beginnings
    • Program for both parents and children
    • Helps young parents develop their children's early language and literacy skills
    • Parents are encouraged to read to their children, and the program conveys the importance of "nurturing" literacy.
    • Parents receive practice in activities meant to foster early learning skills, thus giving them the confidence they need to continue to teach their children.
    • Parents are excited by their children's learning and proud of their own achievement
    • Free books for participants and volunteer support are key
  • 32. RIF’s Family of Readers
    • Focuses on developing the Family Reading ‘Habit”
    • Seeks to enhance and celebrate the time families spend reading together
    • Multiple children, ages and reading skills
    • Free books for participants
    • Trained Volunteers Model Family Reading Time
  • 33. RIF’s Read For Change
    • http://www.rif.org/readforchange/
    • Inspired by President Obama’s new Volunteer Initiative United We Serve http://www.serve.gov/
    • GOAL= Log over 3 million minutes of reading with kids by September 11, 2009—the National Day of Service and Remembrance
    • Raise awareness of the impact of children’s illiteracy on the long term economic health of America
    • First Book is an organizational partner in this effort as well as the PTA and Communities in Schools
  • 34. RIF’s Reading Planet
    • http://www.rif.org/kids/readingplanet.htm
    • Kids ages 6-15 can sign in and join Reading Planet
    • Kid Friendly Design
    • 24/7 Interactive website for reading promotion
    • Area include: Activities, BookZone, Game Station and an area for kids to post their thoughts and writing
    • Videos and online stories
    • Kids can keep a reading log and a reading wish list
  • 35. RIF & Multicultural Literacy
    • http://www.rif.org/multicultural_campaign.mspx
    • Begun in 2007 ; Multi-year initiative
    • Targeted effort to promote and support early childhood literacy in African-American, Hispanic and American Indian communities
    • Spokespersons and educational leaders
    • Essay by Dr. Rudine Simms Bishop of OSU
    • Visible corporate partners that have strong cachet within the communities
    • UNIVISION, RadioOne , Native America Calling, Koahnic (Native American Radio)
  • 36. RIF’s Leading to Reading
    • Reading Is Fundamental | Leading to Reading Home
    • For Preschoolers (ages 0-5) and their parents
    • Animated characters, Rita and Riffy , guide users
    • Bilingual (English and Spanish versions of same content)
    • Simple design for low literacy adults
  • 37. RIF’s ¡ Leamos en familia!
    • http://www.rif.org/kids/leer/es/leerhome.htm
    • New Bilingual site specifically designed for Latino families
    • Areas highlight early literacy activities: shared reading, singing, sharing stories…together as a family
  • 38. A RIF Corporate Partner— Macy’s
    • RIF has an exciting and active presence at the annual Miami International Book Fair with the help of Macy’s --the department store chain
    • RIF MAP 2.0
  • 39. RIF… By The Numbers
    • RIF provides 4.6 million children with 16 million new, free books and literacy resources each year.
    • 19,000 RIF Program Locations around the US
    • 75% of the cost of most books are covered by Federal Funds (administered by RIF/US Dept. of Education)
  • 40. RIF Building Blocks
    • Children always choose Free Books for their very own home ‘library’
    • Motivational, celebratory, reading/literacy enhancement activities must be part of every RIF Book Program
    • Program partners (publishers/vendors) offer books to RIF groups at deep discounts; fundraising and matching
    • Volunteer support (community and businesses) is key
    • Literacy research and training support for RIF Coordinators and Volunteers and now…Parents
    • National branding and marketing opportunities for corporate and/or nonprofit partners
  • 41. MY BOOK!
    • I did it!
    • I did it!  Come and look At what I’ve done! I read a book!  When someone wrote it Long ago For me to read, How did he know That this was the book I’d take from the shelf And lie on the floor And read by myself?
    • I really read it! Just like that! Word by word,  From first to last! I’m sleeping with This book in bed, This first FIRST book I’ve ever read!
    • ~ David L. Harrison ~ (from Somebody Catch My Homework )
  • 42. First Book
  • 43. First Book Beginnings
    • First Book was founded in 1992
    • Kyle Zimmer, and two friends joined together to create an organization to deliver books to children in need
    • In that first year, First Book distributed 12,000 books in three communities
  • 44. First Book Vision Statement
    • “ First Book envisions a world where all children have an enriched learning environment with new books and educational resources of their own.”
  • 45.
    • National Book Bank (FBNBB)
    • Advisory Boards and Volunteers at all levels
    • Entrepreneurial; employs a business model
    • Strong emphasis on marketing and creating mutually beneficial nonprofit/for profit partnerships
    • Strong Web 2.0 presence and web sales/marketing
    • Research on literacy and data that documents First Book program effectiveness
    • Training and resources for volunteers
    First Book Programs & Sevices
  • 46. First Book Advisory Boards
    • At the local level, all activities are managed by First Book Advisory Boards (ABs)
    • Network of volunteer community leaders
    • Advocates and ambassadors
    • Tasks
      • Fundraise for Program…and books!
      • Award book grants to local literacy programs,
      • Raise awareness of literacy issues
      • Build collaborations within communities, college campuses and universities.
  • 47. First Book Book Bank
    • First Book National Book Bank was created in 1999
    • supported by donations from more than 50 publishers
    • centralized distribution system for large-scale donations
    • distributes millions of books annually
    • works with warehousing partners and volunteer networks.
    • largest single distribution of the FBNBB was 2 million books in 2002
  • 48. First Book Book Relief
    • First Book’s Book Relief offered support for Gulf Coast communities affected by Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma
    • 5.1 million books distributed over 2 years
  • 49. First Book is Entrepreneurial http://www.fbmarketplace.org/ “… an online store selling high-quality children's books and educational materials at deeply discounted prices to organizations serving children from low-income families.”
  • 50. First Book Connects Volunteers
    • Web 2.0 employed for peer to peer volunteer recruitment and support
    • Web 2.0 methods for grassroots marketing of program and fundraising
    • http://blog.firstbook.org/
  • 51.
    • Maintains a valuable resource site Literacy in the United States
    • Useful for FB Advisory Boards and volunteers
    • Effectively leverages literacy research data for grant writing with corporate and foundation partners, educators, librarians
    First Book and Literacy Research
  • 52. First Book Funding
    • FB is funded by a network of corporate partners
    • More than 80% of its $ from cause-based marketing
    • Savvy; private sector strategies
    • Social venture marketing with “cause-related “ marketing campaigns
    • Leverages print, online, and retail presence by/with/for corporate partners
  • 53. First Book By The Numbers
    • 17 th Year
    • 60 million brand new books to children
    • Hundreds of Communities Nationwide
    • The largest single distribution of the FBNBB was 2 million books in 2002
    • First Book delivered approximately 8 Million books in 2008
    • Largest single book donation to the NBB? 1.9 million books from Random House in 2005
  • 54. First Book Building Blocks
    • Children receive the FIRST and/or Free Books for their very own home ‘library’
    • Advisory Groups are central; corporate and volunteer support is built in to the programs
    • Books from NBB are sold to FB Advisory Groups at deep discounts; fundraising and matching funds
    • Heavy emphasis on national branding and marketing opportunities for corporate and/or nonprofit partners
    • Leverages literacy research for “cause marketing” and training support
    • Uses Web 2.0 tools for marketing and recruitment
  • 55.
    • " Many things we need
    • can wait.
    • The child cannot.
    • Now is the time
    • his bones are formed,
    • his mind developed.
    • To him we cannot say tomorrow,
    • his name is today."
    • ~Gabriela Mistral ~
  • 56. Selected US Literacy Resources
    • The Center for Summer Learning at Johns Hopkins University http://www.sum merlearning.org/ Simple ‘doable’ solutions for parents and how to slow the ‘summer slide’
    • Storybook Corner on the Harvard Family Research Project Site http://www.hfrp.org/
    • Reading Rockets http://www.readingrockets.org/ offers support for struggling and reluctant readers
    • Center for Family Literacy http://www.famlit.org/
    • The 2008 Kids and Family Reading Report: Reading in the 21 st Century (sponsored by Scholastic and Yankelovich Research)
    • International Reading http://www.reading.org/
  • 57. More US Literacy Resources
    • Collaborative Summer Library Program CSLP Cooperative—multiple states share the same theme
    • A collaborative public web site managed by NYC’s Tri-Li Brooklyn New York and Queens Libraries to support summer reading for all ages http://www.summerreading.org/
    • Develop/share research on the impact of summer reading and “summer set-back” IMLS supported study on impact of Summer Reading ( Dominican University )
    • Reading Rockets http://www.readingrockets.org “Teaching kids to read and helping those who struggle.”
  • 58.
    • Books to the ceiling, Books to the sky. My pile of books Are a mile high. How I love them! How I need them! I'll have a long beard By the time I read them. ~ Arnold Lobel ~
  • 59. Grazie Mille!
    • Thank You!
    • Further Questions? Please contact:
    • Barbara A. Genco, MLS
    • Editor, Collection Management, Library Journal
    • Visiting Associate Professor, Pratt Institute School of Library and Information Science
    • Brooklyn (New York), USA
    • [email_address]
  • 60.