Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Content standards math a
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Content standards math a

484

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
484
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Give teachers poster board to complete the Blind sort.One person per grade level.
  • We will start with an overview of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.We have 20 mins to go through 1-15Which we should be able to do
  • The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics are comprised of BOTH practice standards and content standards. The Practice Standards focus on HOWstudents are learning math. The content standards focus on WHAT students are learning. The Standards for Mathematical Practice provide a vision to be applied to the teaching and learning of the content standards. In January, we will be focusing on the Standards for Mathematical Practice. The Content Standards will be covered in the month of February.Practice Standards focus on HOW, which is directly related to SIOP (best practice model) and WIDA standards and objectives (for LEP students) in that Language Objectives state HOW the students will demonstrate what they learn through the four domains of language: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
  • As you saw in the grade level video, there are significant changes taking place in the new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. It’s not just about teachers getting a new set of standards and doing business as normal. Copy the 6 shifts of math from engageSILO- stock piling materials
  • The content standards for K-12 mathematics are broken into standards, clusters, and domains.
  • Domains are similar to the “strands” from the previously adopted North Carolina curriculum. Domains are larger groups of related standards or clusters. For example, the domain shown here is Operations and Algebraic Thinking.
  • A cluster is a group of related standards that begin with a bold heading. For example, there are 3 clusters seen here. The last cluster begins with: “Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.” There are 2 standards included in this particular cluster.
  • Standards define what students should understand and be able to do. For example, there are 4 standards listed on the screen. The second one reads: “Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. By end of grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.”
  • This diagram shows the K-12 domains in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. As you can see, the domains taught in elementary math are:Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Number and Operations in Base Ten, Measurement and Data, and Geometry.Kindergarten has an additional domain of Counting and Cardinality.Grades 3-5 have a domain of Number & Operations-Fractions.The content is very tightly aligned to promote the vertical progression of math concepts.
  • In order to quickly identify them, the standards can also be abbreviated. There are two examples of standards seen here: 4.G.1 and 1.NBT.2a
  • The first number indicates the grade level. The grade levels represented here are 4th and 1st grades.
  • The middle part of the abbreviation indicates the domain. In the 4th grade example, the domain is Geometry. In the 1st grade example, the domain is Number and Operations in Base Ten.
  • The final number in the abbreviation indicates the standard. In 4.G.1, it would be standard number 1. At times, there may be a letter that follows the standard number. For example, in the 1st grade example, the standard would be 2a, which indicates multiple parts to a particular standard.
  • At the beginning of each grade level, a brief overview is provided listing key concepts for each domain. Teachers should still use the actual standards for a more comprehensive definition of what students must learn. The overview is simply a quick glimpse into the big ideas. The Standards for Mathematical Practice are also listed on the overview to reiterate the importance of students using them to learn mathematics at all grade levels.Given as homework- can skip- BLUE
  • Critical areas are identified for each grade level. They are designed to bring focus to the standards at each grade level by describing the big ideas that educators can use to build their curriculum and guide instruction. There are three critical areas for 4th grade on which instructional time should focus. A description of each critical area is also provided. You will find the bulk of instructional time is allotted to these areas.Thinking device- put the critical areas in your own words
  • Show briefly- Have teacher now move to their grade level teams
  • Each person will read through the activity. Remember to focus on the analysis of the task, not the mathematical answers. You will have 8 minutes to complete this independently. When finished, please sit quietly for everyone else to finish. We will give you directions for the next step.
  • Teacher will discuss at their tables then share out. This restates the questions listed on the paper.
  • Each grade level will have an opportunity to share the analysis and allow the table time to discuss and reflect.Start with Kindergarten, allow the table to share and discuss for 4 minutes. Come back together & share out for 1 minute.Repeat for grades 1-5….coming back together as a group after each grade level. if time permits – I would like for teacher to move to a K-5 table to discuss and omit sharing out. We will circulate.
  • As a group, participants should work together to identify the grade level in which each critical area standard belongs.Teachers will use the critical areas on Legal paper or (Blue) Grade level overview page review to check their work.You will receive the answers after the activity is complete.10-mins
  • Handout: “K-5 Mathematics At a Glance” & How to end 2011-2012 school yearThe K-5 Mathematics At a Glance Document will help teachers focus on the content that is new to or moving out of a grade level. The first page of this document, which you have a copy of, shows what teachers can do THIS year to eliminate any gaps. There will not be a transition year, so teachers can work to teach these skills at the end of the year. These would be great end of the year (post-EOG) content topics on which to focus!
  • STOP !!!!The following slides are important but can be covered in a PLT if we find ourselves short on time.
  • Transcript

    • 1. As you are seated: Each table must have one grade level representative for today’sactivity. Sort the content cards by placing them in the appropriate grade level
    • 2. Desired Outcomes:By the end of the day, participants will have: An understanding of the six shifts evident within the CCSS for Mathematics. An understanding of the components of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. An understanding of the critical areas within the CCSS for K-5 Mathematics. An opportunity to discuss grade-specific activities from the critical areas.
    • 3. Today’s Training: Shifts of Mathematics Overview of the CCSS-M Reading the Standards Critical Areas
    • 4. Practice vs. Content Standards Practice Standards:  HOW the students are learningContent Standards: WHAT the students are learning
    • 5. Common Core Shifts for Mathematics With CCSS-M: Before CCSS-M: Focus “Mile-wide, inch deep” Coherence Silos Fluency Memorizing procedures Deep Conceptual without understanding Understanding “ Applications (Modeling) Balanced Emphasis Adapted from http://engageny.org/ and http://www.ode.state.or.us/
    • 6. 6 Shifts of Mathematics 1. Focus • Intensive Focus 2. Coherence • Linking Back 3. Fluency • Speed & Accuracy4. Deep Understanding • Mathematical 5. Application Modeling6. Balanced Emphasis
    • 7. Content Standards Standards Content Standards Domains Clusters
    • 8. Domain
    • 9. K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-12 Counting andCardinality Operations and Operations and Expressions and Algebraic Algebra Algebraic Thinking Equations Thinking Number &Number & Operations Operations Number and The Number System Modeling in Base Ten Base Ten Quantity Fractions MeasurementMeasurement and Data and Data Geometry Geometry Geometry Geometry Statistics and Statistics and Probability Probability Ratio and Proportional Functions Functions Relationships
    • 10. Nomenclature 4.G.1 1.NBT.2a
    • 11. 4.G.1 1.NBT.2a
    • 12. 4.G.1 1.NBT.2a
    • 13. 4.G.1 1.NBT.2a
    • 14. Grade LevelOverviews
    • 15. Critical Area ActivityFind thispage inyourhandouts.
    • 16. Critical Areas Activity Grade Level Analysis  Read through the activity.  Analyze using the guiding questions on the handout.  Focus on the analysis of the activity, not the answers to the problem.
    • 17. Critical Area Activity Identify the critical area that aligns with this activity. Identify the Mathematical Practice that correlate to this activity. Which instructional practices or strategies are evident?  What is consistent from previous years?  What changes do you notice?  What instructional challenges may occur ?
    • 18. Critical Areas Activities Vertical Discussions  Each grade level will share an overview of their activity.  As a table, discuss the questions on the handout.
    • 19. Critical Areas Sort Lets review our critical area “blind” sort. What are some notable changes you see?
    • 20. What’s Resources Available Now changed?Changes … At a Glance How can we eliminate the gaps?
    • 21. Reflection Use a sticky note to provide feedback on today’s training.

    ×