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Engl 214 fall 2010 week 2.1 introduction to psychoanalysis

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  • 1. ENGL 214 Fall 2010
    WEEK 1
    Introduction to
    Freud/Psychoanalysis
  • 2. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    Psychology
    Psychiatry
    Psychoanalysis
  • 3. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    psyche: originates from Greek myth, a word that originally referred to the ‘soul’ ; in modern context refers to the mental life in contrast to the body
  • 4. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    Sigmund Freud biography:
    - born 6 May 1856 in Freiberg
    - son of Jewish wool merchant
    - moved to Vienna at age of 4
    - left in 1938, threats by Nazis
    - died in England 23 Sept. 1939
  • 5. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    Freud began with clinical approach to curing neurosis (Studies in Hysteria, 1896), through hypnosis, free association and other means
  • 6. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    The Interpretation of Dreams (1900) Freud considered it to be his most important work.
    - Study of dreams moved him from clinical analysis of the ‘abnormal’ to the ‘normal’
    - Most ‘radical’ claim: we are all neurotics
  • 7. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    approached not just dream interpretation but also interpretation of the language of everyday life: day dreams, slips of the tongue (parapraxes), interruption of personal wishes/desires by social constraints
  • 8. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    by the end of his life had expanded psychoanalysis to examine art, literature, war, death and the origins of culture, society and relgion
  • 9. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    Literary Interpretation:
    Lessons of Psychoanalysis
  • 10. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    Interpretation:
    - stories and images are not always what they appear to be on the surface (role of symbolism)
    - not just deeper meaning, but often the presence of two conflicting meanings
    - slips/mispoken words/chance + non-intended meanings or associations should not be dismissed by readers, but become central
    - not just ‘search for meaning’ but looking at blockage of communication and meaning: unconscious takes the form of a ‘resistance’ to speaking/remembering/retelling
  • 11. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    stories and images are not always what they appear to be on the surface (role of symbolism, condensation +
    displacement)
  • 12. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    not just searching for deeper meaning, but often the presence of two conflicting meanings
  • 13. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    slips/mispokenwords/chance + non-intended meanings or associations should not be dismissed by readers, but become central to the literary + readerly enterprise
  • 14. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    reading is not just ‘search for meaning’ but looking at the absence of meaning (gaps and silences), the blockage of communication: often the unconscious takes the form of a ‘resistance’ to speaking, remembering or retelling
  • 15. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    1. The Unconsicous
  • 16. P. Thurschwell. Sigmund Freud. London and New York: Routledge, 2000. 4. Print.
    Unconscious: storehouse of instinctual desires and needs
    - Preserves childhood wishes and memories (even those erased from consciousness)
  • 17. P. Thurschwell. Sigmund Freud. London and New York: Routledge, 2000. 4. Print.
    Unconscious: trash can that never gets taken out
    “in mental life nothing which has once been formed can perish – … everything is somehow preserved and … in suitable circumstances … it can once more be brought to light” - – Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents
  • 18. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    1I. The Edo/Id/Superego
  • 19. ENGL 214, Fall 2010
    III. Oedipus Complex
  • 20. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    Freud: the “cure” is self-reflection, self-knowledge
  • 21. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    cure and catharsis: cleansing, purging, purfication
  • 22. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    Poe invents the detective
    Story in
    - no readership
    - 1st audience is for Sherlock Holmes stories in
  • 23. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    Agatha Christie:
    best-selling author of all time (tied with Shakespeare)
  • 24. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    - 1st recorded use of the expression “detective story” appears in 1878
  • 25. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    - used by the American novelist Anna Katharine Greene (1846-1935) in her book,
    The Leavenworth Case (1878)
    - First work of detective fiction
    written by a woman
  • 26. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    - 1st recorded use of the expression “detective story” appears in 1878
  • 27. scientific method
    Poes interest in photography science and criminal investigation
  • 28. Brave New World, published 1932
  • 29. II. Defining “Detective Fiction”
  • 30. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    III. The Economics of the Short Story
  • 31. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    detective fiction
  • 32. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    why short story?
  • 33. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    towards the end of the 19th century the novel had come
    to be seen as the artistically
    respectable form
  • 34. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    serial publication
    (magazines)
  • 35. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    UK: penny dreadful
    U.S: dime novel
  • 36. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    In UK, detective fiction and short fiction has longer history of serialization in magazines
    Free-standing ‘short story’ (not serials) grows out of North American literary culture
  • 37. Julian Symons, Bloody Murder: From the Detective Story to the Crime Novel. p. 86.
    - short story – most popular form for crime fiction for 30 years
    - its popularity begins to decline after WWI
  • 38. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    Julian Symons:
    1) liberation of
  • 39. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    short story’s popularity
    wanes again after WWI
  • 40. ENGL 211, Summer 2010
    short story’s popularity
    wanes again after WWI