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  • 1. INTRODUCTION TO EXCEPTIONALITIES SPED 23000 INSTRUCTOR: BRIAN FRIEDT Students with hearing impairments and Students with vision impairments
  • 2. Some acknowledgements
    • Vision and hearing impairments only appear together so that we can get through all of the material.
    • Heavy on guest speakers for these topics, lighter on lecture and reading.
    • The book is your friend.
  • 3. Definitional clarity
    • Hearing impairment
      • An impairment in hearing, whether permanent or fluctuating, that adversely affects a child's educational performance but that is not included under the definition of deafness in this rule.
    • Deafness
      • A hearing impairment that is so severe that the child is impaired in processing linguistic information through hearing, with or without amplification, that adversely affects a child's educational performance.
  • 4. Definitional clarity
    • Vision impairment
      • Impairment in vision that, even with correction, adversely affects a child's educational performance. The term includes both partial sight and blindness. Visual impairment for any child means:
        • (a) A visual impairment, not primarily perceptual in nature, resulting in a measured visual acuity of 20/70 or poorer in the better eye with correction; or
        • (b) A physical eye condition that affects visual functioning to the extent that special education placement, materials and/or services are required in an educational setting.
  • 5. Prevalence
  • 6. Prevalence
    • Hearing impairments
      • 0.11% of school age population
      • 1.2% of special education population
    • Visual impairments
      • 0.04% of school age population
      • 0.4% of special education population
    • SLD
      • 4.14% of school age population
      • 46.4% of special education population
  • 7. Prevalence – hearing impairments
    • Outside general education less than 21% of the day: 49%
    • Outside general education between 21% and 60% of the day: 18%
    • Outside general education more than 60% of the day: 20%
    • Separate facility: apx. 13%
  • 8. Prevalence – vision impairments
    • Outside general education less than 21% of the day: 58%
    • Outside general education between 21% and 60% of the day: 15%
    • Outside general education more than 60% of the day: 14%
    • Separate facility: apx. 12%
  • 9. Causes, anatomy, screening
    • Refer to the text book
    • Not a major priority for our purposes
  • 10. Sign language
    • Sign language is a true language
      • Grammar
      • Lexicon
      • Syntax
    • As such, students who sign are bilingual
      • This means a lot for instruction
      • Reading and writing are tough
  • 11. Instructional considerations
    • FM amplification
    • Testing accommodations (!!)
    • Explicit instruction in areas of deficit (p.366)
  • 12. Vision impairments
    • No indication that intellectual ability is different from the sighted population
      • Slower on the developmental timeline
    • Paternalism (see p. 414)
    • Orientation and Mobility
    • Accommodation
      • Braille
      • Text-to-speech (should not replace Braille)
      • Large print
      • CCTV
  • 13. Guest speakers
    • Cochlear implants
    • ASL poetry
    • Astronomy
    • Echolocation
    • Baby steps