Ggg3

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  • I am an experimental ecosystem ecologist who studies the biotic and abiotic controls on ecosystem structure and function. We work across scales from the root-soil interface to the globe to predict how ecosystems and their functions will be impacted by global change
  • Mueller at all looked at the distribution of pinyons and junipers on the landscape pre and post two major droughts.
  • So, we know the above ground structure of these systems is changing.
  • So, we know the structure of these systems is changing. But, we don’t know what this means for the belowground communities who are responsible for processing soil carbon.
  • Ggg3

    1. 1. Martha sucht…www.alumniportal-deutschland.orgWebinar-Serie zur NachhaltigkeitTEIL I: Ökologische Konzepte22. April, 18-19 Uhr (UTC+1): Vom Wert der Arten: Biodiversität alsLebensgrundlage (auf Deutsch)26. April, 17-18 Uhr (UTC+1): Plenteous oceans? How we can winthe battle against overfishing (in English)29. April, 18-19:30 Uhr (UTC+1): Alumni präsentieren ihreForschungsprojekte (auf Deutsch/ Englisch)
    2. 2. Prof. Dr. Jens GebauerSustainable Agricultural Production Systemswith Special Focus on HorticultureIndigenous Fruit Trees in Africa
    3. 3. Genetic improvement• Number of local types,growth shape, size,fruits (taste, shape,sweetness), bark…• No varieties areavailable in Sudan(ecotypes)7
    4. 4. 12
    5. 5. Selected References• Sennhenn A, Prinz K, Gebauer J, Whitbread A, Jamnadass R, Kehlenbeck K 2013 Identification of mango (Mangifera indica L.) landracesfrom Eastern and Central Kenya using a morphological and molecular approach. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution: accepted• Gebauer J, Bernholt H, Hammer K 2013 Grewia flavescens: a potential horticultural crop? Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution:accepted• Gebauer J, Luedeling E 2013 A note on baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) in Kordofan, Sudan. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution60:1587-1596• Goenster S, Wiehle M, Kehlenbeck K, Jamnadass R, Gebauer J, Buerkert A 2011 Indigenous fruit trees in homegardens of the NubaMountains, Central Sudan: tree diversity and potential for improving nutrition and income of rural communities. Acta Horticulturae911:355-364• Hunsche M, Buerling K, Saied A S, Schmitz-Eiberger M, Kundi S, Gebauer J, Noga G, Buerkert A 2010 Surface properties, chlorophyllfluorescence and light remission, and cellular compounds of Grewia tenax (Forssk.) Fiori and Tamarindus indica L. leaves as affected byNaCl treatments. Plant Growth Regulation 61:253-263• Thompson J L, Gebauer J, Hammer K, Buerkert A 2010 The structure of urban and peri-urban gardens in Khartoum, Sudan. GeneticResources and Crop Evolution 57:478-500• Thompson J L, Gebauer J, Buerkert A 2010 Fences in urban and peri-urban gardens of Khartoum, Sudan. Forests, Trees and Livelihoods19:379-391• Saied A, Sohail M, Gebauer J, Buerkert A 2010 Response of Grewia tenax (Forssk.) Fiori to NaCl-induced salinity. European Journal ofHorticultural Science 75:42-50• Bernholt H, Kehlenbeck K, Gebauer J, Buerkert A 2009 Plant species richness and diversity in urban and peri-urban gardens of Niamey,Niger. Agroforestry Systems 77:159-179• Saied A, Gebauer J, Hammer K, Buerkert A 2008 Ziziphus spina-christi (L.) Willd.: a multipurpose fruit tree. Genetic Resources and CropEvolution 55:929-937• Gebauer J, El-Siddig K, El-Tahir B A, Salih A A, Ebert G, Hammer K 2007 Exploiting the potential of indigenous fruit trees: Grewia tenaxin Sudan. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution 54:1701-1708• Gebauer J, El-Siddig K, Ebert G 2002 Baobab (Adansonia digitata L.): a review on a multipurpose tree with promising future in theSudan. European Journal of Horticultural Science 4:155-160• Gebauer J, El Siddig K, Salih A A, Ebert G 2004 Tamarindus indica L. seedlings are moderately salt tolerant when exposed to NaCl-induced salinity. Scientia Horticulturae 103:1-8
    6. 6. Thank you for your attention!
    7. 7. Ecosystems are changing.
    8. 8. Ecosystems are changing.Abiotic pressures such as climatic change are altering Netprimary production and species distributions in many areas.
    9. 9. Ecosystems are changing.Similarly biotic pressures, such as invasive plants and animals,are changing the diversity and function of many ecosystems.
    10. 10. Ecosystems are changing.Similarly biotic pressures, such as invasive plants and animals,are changing the diversity and function of many ecosystems.
    11. 11. Ecosystems are changing.abiotic bioticabiotic biotic×
    12. 12. Ecosystems are changing.abiotic bioticabiotic biotic×
    13. 13. Understanding how abiotic, biotic, andthe interaction between abiotic and bioticfactors impact ecosystem structure andfunction is what ecosystem ecology is allabout.abiotic bioticabiotic biotic×
    14. 14. How will ecosystems function in thefuture?
    15. 15. How will ecosystems function in thefuture?
    16. 16. How will ecosystems function in thefuture?
    17. 17. How will ecosystems function in thefuture?
    18. 18. How will ecosystems function in thefuture?
    19. 19. Plant communities are changing.
    20. 20. 1996Modified from Mueller, et al. 2005
    21. 21. 1996Modified from Mueller, et al. 2005
    22. 22. 1996Modified from Mueller, et al. 2005
    23. 23. 1996Modified from Mueller, et al. 20052002
    24. 24. 1996Modified from Mueller, et al. 2005200247%decline
    25. 25. 1996Modified from Mueller, et al. 2005200247%declineBelowgroundcommunities?
    26. 26. Soil communities might play a role inplant community change.
    27. 27. Soil communities might play a role inplant community change.✕✕✕✕✕
    28. 28. Soil communities might play a role inplant community change.✕✕✕✕✕
    29. 29. Experiments can help us predict howecosystems will function in the future.
    30. 30. Changing abiotic factorsFree Air CO2 Experiment (FACE), Oak RidgeTennessee, USA
    31. 31. Changing abiotic factorsPrecipitation manipulation, Sevietta NewMexico, USA
    32. 32. Changing bioticfactorsSunset Crater herbivoremanipulation, Flagstaff,Arizona, USA
    33. 33. Sunset Crater herbivoremanipulation, Flagstaff,Arizona, USAChanging bioticfactors
    34. 34. Hemlock study, Coweeta Lab,North Carolina, USAChanging bioticfactors
    35. 35. Hemlock study, Coweeta Lab,North Carolina, USAChanging bioticfactors
    36. 36. How will ecosystems function in thefuture?(1) Plant communities will change.
    37. 37. How will ecosystems function in thefuture?(1) Plant communities will change.(2) Soil communities might play a rolein these changes.
    38. 38. How will ecosystems function in thefuture?(1) Plant communities will change.(2) Soil communities might play a rolein these changes.(3) Experiments can help us predicthow ecosystems will function in thefuture.
    39. 39. How will ecosystems function in thefuture?
    40. 40. questions

    ×