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Tackling Childhood Obesity   The Role Of Good Communications
 

Tackling Childhood Obesity The Role Of Good Communications

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AFIC Symposium on Food & Safety Initiatives in Asia/Pacific, 29 April 2009, Singapore. www.afic.org

AFIC Symposium on Food & Safety Initiatives in Asia/Pacific, 29 April 2009, Singapore. www.afic.org

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    Tackling Childhood Obesity   The Role Of Good Communications Tackling Childhood Obesity The Role Of Good Communications Presentation Transcript

    • Tackling Childhood Obesity ..the role of GOOD communication Presented by Beverley Postma AFIC Symposium on Food Safety Initiatives in Asia/Pacific. SINGAPORE - April 29, 2009
    • Overview • Childhood obesity: a global challenge • Some basic facts • The role of good communication • An Irish case study • Taking action in Asia
    • 1. A GLOBAL CHALLENGE
    • “Obesity is one of today’s most blatantly visible – yet most neglected – public health problems. If immediate action is not taken, millions will suffer from an array of serious health disorders” World Health Organisation, 2009
    • A Global Epidemic WHO and International Obesity Task Force: 300 million people around the world are obese (BMI>30) At least 155 million school-age children are overweight or obese (BMI>25)
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30% Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2006 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30% Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC.
    • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2007 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30% Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC.
    • A Global Epidemic WHO and International Obesity Task Force: 300 million people around the world are obese (BMI>30) At least 155 million school-age children are overweight or obese (BMI>25) Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC.
    • 2. SOME BASIC FACTS
    • Defining Obesity • Obesity means an excess amount of body fat. • No general agreement exists on the definition of obesity in children as it does for adults. • Most professionals use published guidelines based on the body mass index (BMI)
    • Definitions for Adults • An adult who has a • An adult who has a BMI between 25 and BMI of 30 or higher is 29.9 is considered considered obese. overweight.
    • Impact on Children PHYSICAL HEALTH EMOTIONAL HEALTH • • Low self-esteem Type 2 diabetes • • Negative body image Hypertension • • Depression Dyslipidemia • Hepatic steatosis (fatty liver) SOCIAL HEALTH • Cholelithiasis (gallstones) • Stigma • Sleep apnea • Negative stereotyping • Orthopedic problems • Discrimination • Asthma • Teasing and bullying • Heart Disease • Social marginalization
    • Impact on Society Estimates of Obesity-related Health Care Costs (USA) – U.S. Government $110 billion – American Obesity Association $237 billion
    • Contributing Factors • Increased use of motorised transport • Fall in opportunities for recreational physical activity • Increased sedentary recreation • Greater quantities & availability of energy dense foods • More use of restaurants and fast food outlets • More frequent and widespread food purchasing opportunities IOTF report to the WHO
    • ENERGY ENERGY IN VS EXPENDITURE • More energy dense foods • Motorised transport • More use of restaurants • Less physical activity • More purchasing • More sedentary opportunities recreation
    • Balancing the Energy Budget FOR CHILDREN: Maintain energy balance at a healthy weight - while protecting health, growth, development, and nutritional status
    • Diverse Diets • Some years ago the photographer Peter Menzel took pictures of 30 families in 24 countries, depicting the food they eat in one week
    • GERMANY
    • USA (North Carolina)
    • ITALY
    • GREAT BRITAIN
    • KUWAIT
    • MEXICO
    • USA (CALIFORNIA)
    • CHINA
    • POLAND
    • EGYPT
    • MONGOLIA
    • ECUADOR
    • BHUTAN
    • CHAD
    • 3. GOOD COMMUNICATION
    • Evidence-Based Communication • Negative messages rarely work • Demonising food can be unhelpful • Mixed messages are confusing • Focus on empowering parents • Equip children with a new LIFE SKILL
    • A Collaborative Effort • Governments • NGOs & Charities • Health professionals • Community groups (practitioners & researchers) • Employers • Food industry • Media • Schools & childcare • Parents providers • Individuals
    • 4. AN IRISH CASE STUDY
    • Estimated EU prevalence of overweight & obesity 18% of adults are >300,000are 39% children obese areoverweight or overweight obese The report of the National Taskforce on obesity force (2005)
    • Children & Teenagers • In 2007, there were • Children 5-12 yrs* 1,056,947 children in 11% overweight Ireland under the 11% obese age of 18yrs • Teenagers 13-17yrs** (24.5% of the 11% overweight population) 8% obese (IUNA dietary surveys, *2005 and **2008).
    • Family Role Models • 89% of all eating • Children with active occasions for 5-12 year parents are 1.5 times olds are at home* more likely to be active than children of inactive parents. • Children of normal weight parents are more likely to • If BOTH parents are be normal weight** active, their children are 5.8 times more likely to be active.** *Gibney and Burke, National Children’s Survey, 2005 **IUNA Dietary Surveys 2005, 2008
    • Positive Collaboration • National Taskforce on Obesity (est. March ‘04) made 93 recommendations • It recognised that a multi-sectoral approach was necessary • Greater co-operation with food industry • Need to engage both EU and global level
    • Leadership in Action The EU food industry has made 200 commitments (covering: food labelling; education; physical activity; promotion; advertising and product reformulation) Irish food industry is at the forefront of EU activity
    • Nutrition & Health Foundation • Multi-stakeholder organisation • Industry-funded • First of its kind in Europe • Bringing together Government & non-government stakeholders • Communicating evidence-based information on healthy lifestyles
    • Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs) • The one, truly pan-European scheme • Key information on calories, sugars, fat, saturated fat & salt (sodium) • Front of pack icons enable quick decisions • Irish uptake: 50% of branded food; 90% of retail own-brand products.
    • Consumers’ Verdict • 75% of consumers find GDAs easy to understand • 88% find GDA information useful • 87% feel GDAs help you select healthier choices • 81% would like to see GDA labels on more food products.
    • 5. TAKING ACTION IN ASIA
    • Obesity in Asia “The rapid modernisation of China & other Asian countries has produced an alarming spike in the rate of obesity and diabetes. Rates of childhood obesity are rising at 1% each year - roughly the same rate as Britain, the US and Australia. Asia currently has aprox two-thirds of the world's diabetics, around 90 million people” Paul Zimmet, Chairman of the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF), 2006
    • Keys to Success • Invest in positive collaborative solutions • Insist on GOOD communication • Equip young people with a new LIFE SKILL • Empower parents and care-givers • Demonstrate leadership • Take action NOW
    • ….Is obesity on your agenda? Thank You. Any Questions?