Mango Goes Hawaiian<br />Starting with the owners…<br />
MangoComplete:<br />Hawaiian<br />Kelly Schaefer<br />
Hawaiian Language(ʻŌleloHawaiʻi)<br />Language family: Polynesian (a sub-family of Austronesian languages)<br />Correct or...
Languages of Hawaiʻi<br />2 official languages:<br />English<br />Hawaiian<br />Hawaiian Creole English (HCE):<br />Often ...
History: Endangerment and Revival<br />1778: First reported European discovery (James Cook, British)<br />1820: American P...
History(continued)<br />1830s to 1950s: Hawaiian was banned in schools and students who used it were punished<br />Results...
Island of Niʻihau: An exception<br />On Niʻihau, the prevalence of Hawaiian is the reverse:<br />Hawaiian is the first lan...
Spelling and Pronunciation<br />Hawaiian has only 12 letters, plus the ʻokina (considered a consonant).<br />A, E, I, O, U...
Spelling and Pronunciation(continued)<br />Vowels<br />Short: /i/, /u/, /ɛ/ ~ /e/, /o/, /ɐ/ ~ /ə/<br />Long: /iː/, /uː/, /...
Grammar<br />Analytic (lack of inflection) - grammatical relationships conveyed via unbound morphemes<br />Lack of verb co...
Cultural Sensitivity<br />When marketing and selling to native Hawaiians, do NOT call it a “foreign language.”<br />Hawaii...
Fun tidbits<br />Wikipedia: the “wiki” comes from Hawaiian, and it means “fast”.<br />Another term we’re familiar with, “m...
mahalo!<br />
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Hawaiian presentation

5,929 views
5,449 views

Published on

Ke

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,929
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
28
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Hawaiian presentation

  1. 1. Mango Goes Hawaiian<br />Starting with the owners…<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3.
  4. 4. MangoComplete:<br />Hawaiian<br />Kelly Schaefer<br />
  5. 5. Hawaiian Language(ʻŌleloHawaiʻi)<br />Language family: Polynesian (a sub-family of Austronesian languages)<br />Correct orthography (spelling) of the state: HAWAIʻI(special symbol = ʻokina)<br />Correct orthography of the adjective: HAWAIIAN (no ʻokina)<br />Why? The ʻokina represents a sound (the glottal stop) and saying “Hawaiʻi” without it is incorrect. “Hawaiian” is an ENGLISH word so it doesn’t use the ʻokina.<br />
  6. 6. Languages of Hawaiʻi<br />2 official languages:<br />English<br />Hawaiian<br />Hawaiian Creole English (HCE):<br />Often simply called “Pidgin” in Hawaiʻi<br />This is not a dialect of English nor one of Hawaiian. Like any creole, it combines aspects of both but is its own language.<br />Endangered language: native speakers are under 0.1% of the statewide population (as of 2001)<br />
  7. 7. History: Endangerment and Revival<br />1778: First reported European discovery (James Cook, British)<br />1820: American Protestant missionaries arrive, establishing an alphabet in order to translate the Bible, preach in Hawaiian, and convert natives to Christianity.<br />Despite the spread of literacy, many native Hawaiian speakers left to explore other areas of the world and many non-Hawaiians immigrated to Hawaiʻi, bringing diseases with them<br />Result: sharp decrease in status of Hawaiian and # of speakers<br />
  8. 8. History(continued)<br />1830s to 1950s: Hawaiian was banned in schools and students who used it were punished<br />Results: some parents chose to abandon speaking Hawaiian; others felt pressure to do so. Both contributed to the language’s decline.<br />1980s: Movement to increase the number of fluent speakers started by establishing public immersion schools.<br />One result: national parks had their names changed to observe Hawaiian spelling<br />
  9. 9. Island of Niʻihau: An exception<br />On Niʻihau, the prevalence of Hawaiian is the reverse:<br />Hawaiian is the first language here with English as a foreign language.<br />Niʻihau has been privately owned for over 100 years and outsiders are rarely allowed to visit.<br />The dialect of Niʻihau is significantly different than “standard” Hawaiian.<br />
  10. 10. Spelling and Pronunciation<br />Hawaiian has only 12 letters, plus the ʻokina (considered a consonant).<br />A, E, I, O, U, H, K, L, M, N, P, W, and ʻ.<br /> Consonants:<br />/m/, /n/, /p/, /t/~/k/*, /h/, /w/~/v/*, /l/<br />*There is variation between /t/ and /k/, as well as /w/ and /v/, for historical and orthographic reasons<br />
  11. 11. Spelling and Pronunciation(continued)<br />Vowels<br />Short: /i/, /u/, /ɛ/ ~ /e/, /o/, /ɐ/ ~ /ə/<br />Long: /iː/, /uː/, /eː/, /oː/, /aː/ <br />These are written with macrons: ā, ō, etc. The distinction matters and can completely change the meaning of a word!<br />Diphthongs: composed of two vowel sounds. Greek: δίφθογγος, diphthongos; di = two, phthongos = sound.<br />E.g., au, oi, ai, etc.<br />Long vowels can also be part of a diphthong.<br />
  12. 12. Grammar<br />Analytic (lack of inflection) - grammatical relationships conveyed via unbound morphemes<br />Lack of verb conjugation<br />Tense, aspect, and mood is marked by using particles<br />Sentence structure is VSO: Verb – Subject – Object<br />Distinguishes between singular, dual, and plural. E.g. “you by yourself,” “you two,” and “you all”.<br />Also distinguishes between inclusive and exclusive we: “just you and me,” “you, me, and other people,” “someone else and me, but not you,” and “other people and me, but not you.”<br />
  13. 13. Cultural Sensitivity<br />When marketing and selling to native Hawaiians, do NOT call it a “foreign language.”<br />Hawaiian is the native language of the islands, and the Anglicization of Hawaiʻi is a sensitive matter.<br />For Hawaiian residents, call it a “second language” course.<br />
  14. 14. Fun tidbits<br />Wikipedia: the “wiki” comes from Hawaiian, and it means “fast”.<br />Another term we’re familiar with, “muumuu,” is also Hawaiian – but we say it completely wrong!<br />Muʻumuʻuis correct and it simply means “dress”.<br />And a Dave Barry quote:<br />“The Hawaiian language is quite unusual because when the original Polynesians came in their canoes, most of their consonants were washed overboard in a storm, and they arrived here with almost nothing but vowels. All the streets have names like Kal'ia'iou'amaa'aaa'eiou, and many street signs spontaneously generate new syllables during the night.”<br />
  15. 15. mahalo!<br />

×