Fostering Collaboration and Interactivity in a Blended Course<br />
Guiding Principles<br />Community should be part of face-to-face as well as online components of a course<br />The collabo...
Building Community<br />F2F Without Community<br />Think about the strategies/activities you use in F2F to foster communit...
Communication Tools to Foster Online Community<br />E-Mail<br />1-1 and 1-many communication<br />Announcements; reminders...
 Predictability
 Redundancy</li></li></ul><li>List of Collaborative Online or F2F Activities<br />Group discussion<br />Case studies<br />...
Discussion Board<br />Introduce concepts before a F2F class—students share preliminary research and/or experiences<br />Co...
What Is the Question<br />Weak question:Identify 3 poetic devices and provide an example of each.<br />How could this be t...
Team Building for Collaboration<br />Must overcome student push-back on group work (many have had bad experiences)<br />Wh...
Tips for Successful Team-building<br />Limit size to 4-7 members (use Group tool in ELMS)<br />Allow students to self-sele...
The key:Design activities so that the face-to-face and online collaboration and communication each reinforce and elaborate...
Integration, How? <br />Example 1: If you show a video in class, can students then discuss relevant aspects of that video ...
Integration Examples<br />Example 2:Debriefing: either use the face-to-face class  to “debrief”<br />an online discussion....
Example 3: Students are completing a team project. Can they benefit from online discussion on various project aspects befo...
Example 4: <br />You have conducted an online collaboration session<br />using  Wimba Classroom. Students can then in face...
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Communication Considerations in a Blended Course

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  • It is the instructor’s role to create a sense of community in both the f2f and online environments that enables students to interact readily and predictably with both the instructor(s) and with one another. In a community, students feel safe to learn—to ask questions, to support one another, bring more of themselves—their experiences,ideas, concerns—to the learning process. Many of the techniques for creating community lend themselves well to providing hooks into either environment. The trick is to integrate these activities in such a way that they are seamless extensions of the online world into the traditional classroom and vice versa. They shouldn’t appear to be extra layers whose purpose aren’t clearly a part of objective of the learning unit.
  • Show quick video; give participants 5-7 minutes to come up with a list; ask for one or two examples of use
  • This should be recap of ideas generated by group; touch on those that might have been missed. Stress the principle that successful communication must happen frequently, in predictable places and ways, and provide some redundancy (e.g., e-mail reminders of information in announcements or module deadline checklists; set up syllabus with details about communication expectations—where should students contact, how long should they expect to wait for response.
  • Compare this list to items listed by participants
  • Discussion Board is an excellent tool for integrating the activities of the classroom to the activities of the online environment. Provide participants with take-aways for various rubrics for assessing D.B. contributions
  • Provide handout on “Teaching with Social Networks: Establishing a Social Contract”; show UTAP group project/team evaluation; share UTAP PPT module redesign
  • Communication Considerations in a Blended Course

    1. 1. Fostering Collaboration and Interactivity in a Blended Course<br />
    2. 2. Guiding Principles<br />Community should be part of face-to-face as well as online components of a course<br />The collaborative activities and products resulting in either environment should be connected (integrated) so the sense of community naturally extends between both environments<br />Size of class, level of students (e.g., undergrad vs. grad), course discipline will impact choices made for creating communities and developing activities to foster collaboration and communication<br />
    3. 3. Building Community<br />F2F Without Community<br />Think about the strategies/activities you use in F2F to foster community? What are the benefits of establishing community?<br />What strategies/activities could be used online to foster community and collaboration among students? (Group Brainstorm)<br />Online Without Community<br />
    4. 4. Communication Tools to Foster Online Community<br />E-Mail<br />1-1 and 1-many communication<br />Announcements; reminders; share files<br />Discussion Board<br />1-many threaded communication<br />Allows time for participant reflection and follow-up<br />Synchronous Chat<br />1-1 and 1-many communication<br />Live, interactive, builds sense of connection<br />Conversations archived for future reference<br /><ul><li> Frequency
    5. 5. Predictability
    6. 6. Redundancy</li></li></ul><li>List of Collaborative Online or F2F Activities<br />Group discussion<br />Case studies<br />Debates<br />Panels and student-moderated discussion<br />Student-led support<br />Guest speakers<br />Collaborative writing/presentation<br />Role playing<br />Games<br />Demonstrations<br />Activities should meet course or module objectives and enable students to transition between F2F and online environments.<br />
    7. 7. Discussion Board<br />Introduce concepts before a F2F class—students share preliminary research and/or experiences<br />Continue conversations or concepts discussed in class—students build on ideas introduced and/or reflect on concepts<br />Keys to success: <br />Strong question that will prompt engaging conversation<br />Reasonably-sized group responding (4-7, no more than 10) <br />Clear timeline (deadline for original post affords time to respond to posts of others) <br />Payoff (grade supported by a clear grading rubric)<br />Summative feedback from instructor(s) (online or in F2F class)part of integration strategy<br />
    8. 8. What Is the Question<br />Weak question:Identify 3 poetic devices and provide an example of each.<br />How could this be turned into a question that will prompt conversation among students? How, Which and Why questions, as they apply to feelings, experiences or research tend to elicit much more powerful and engaging responses.<br />Stronger question:<br />Which of the poetic devices that have been discussed in class and in your readings has the most powerful impact on you as a reader? Provide an example and describe how the impact of the poem would change if the device was not used or a different device replaced it.Respond to the reflection of two classmates according to the requirements of our DB rubric.<br />
    9. 9. Team Building for Collaboration<br />Must overcome student push-back on group work (many have had bad experiences)<br />Which best describes your experience with student team work?<br />I have used successfully (from instructor & student point of view)<br />I have used successfully, but students don’t like<br />I have used, but they are too much work to be useful<br />I have never used them<br />I would use them if I could figure out how to do so effectively<br />Team work doesn’t fit well with my course<br />
    10. 10. Tips for Successful Team-building<br />Limit size to 4-7 members (use Group tool in ELMS)<br />Allow students to self-select group membership (use Sign-up tool in ELMS)<br />Provide clear milestones<br />Provide low-stakes team-building exercise<br />Require development of team contracts<br />Provide rubrics for students to evaluate each other and to understand how their “product” will be evaluated<br />
    11. 11. The key:Design activities so that the face-to-face and online collaboration and communication each reinforce and elaborate the other <br />
    12. 12. Integration, How? <br />Example 1: If you show a video in class, can students then discuss relevant aspects of that video online using Discussion Board?<br />
    13. 13. Integration Examples<br />Example 2:Debriefing: either use the face-to-face class to “debrief”<br />an online discussion.<br />Or use the online discussion to debrief the <br />face-to-face class <br />
    14. 14. Example 3: Students are completing a team project. Can they benefit from online discussion on various project aspects before they make the actual team presentation in class? <br />Integration Examples<br />
    15. 15. Example 4: <br />You have conducted an online collaboration session<br />using Wimba Classroom. Students can then in face to<br />face Session: <br /><ul><li>discuss and clarify the difficult and complex concepts presented in the Wimbasession.
    16. 16. address the challenges and problems occurred in Wimbacollaboration. </li></ul>Integration Examples<br />
    17. 17. Resources<br />Online Teaching Activity Indexhttp://www.ion.illinois.edu/resources/otai/<br />Web Resources on Active Learning Strategies http://cte.umdnj.edu/active_learning/index.cfm<br />Preparing and Teaching Hybrid Courses: Creating Your Course Activitieshttp://clt.odu.edu/ofo/hybrid.php?src=prep_activities_online<br />Hybrid Courses: Obstacles and Solutions for Faculty and Students http://www.uwex.edu/disted/conference/Resource_library/proceedings/03_72.pdf<br />

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