• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Valdis Krebs, Founder and Chief Scientist, orgnet.com 03-24-09 Employment Net
 

Valdis Krebs, Founder and Chief Scientist, orgnet.com 03-24-09 Employment Net

on

  • 663 views

Building Employment Networks ...

Building Employment Networks
Valdis Krebs, network software and analysis consultant, shares his insights into how to think about and build networks for productive employment opportunities, going beyond popular social networking for numbers.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
663
Views on SlideShare
663
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Valdis Krebs, Founder and Chief Scientist, orgnet.com 03-24-09 Employment Net Valdis Krebs, Founder and Chief Scientist, orgnet.com 03-24-09 Employment Net Document Transcript

    • 1 Interview and transcription March 24, 2009 Valdis Krebs, Social Network Software and Analysis Building Employment Networks So, another area where I think networks come in very handy and very useful and actually very critical, is the other part of our world today and that’s the economy, where especially in middle class jobs where you have anybody from an engineer, an office worker, that type of person, on up to small business people running their own business and things like that, networks are very important. Networks are important for finding jobs and networks are very important in keeping a job. Often when those people are let go and you go back and look at their networks those were the least networked people in the organization. Networks are important for small business people. Networks are important for us to find clients, for us to find partners, for us to find ideas. It’s real important to understand how networks work and how we can build them strategically. Networks are often looked at as, “Well, that’s schmoozing, it’s what a lot of people do, it’s getting on Facebook, it’s getting on Linked In, it’s connecting to a lot of people that you may not even know. So if you go on to Facebook and you look at the list of people that someone’s connected to, or on Linked In, you’ll find that they may connected to five hundred people, but they only know fifty of those people. A lot of these networks get built almost in a race of “mine’s bigger”, or people are trying to have more connections than their friends and then they can brag about it at the bar on Friday night. But the problem with that though is that network is a false network and it gives a false sense of security and people think, “Well, I’ve got five hundred people in my network, I’m fine. I don’t have to worry about loosing my job, and even if I do loose my job, with that five hundred person network, I’m going to find a new one lickity split.” But that’s not how it happens, because once people try to use this network, once they start to use this network of false ties, they find it doesn’t work as well. All of a sudden they call this person up and boy, this person was real nice to them when they met them at the local COSE event, or the conference they were at, or the I-Open event, but now all of a sudden this person doesn’t even know them anymore so it’s not really a useful tie. Or, it’s somebody they might have chatted with on Twitter and then all of a sudden, “Oh, my God, help this person?” “No, I’m sorry, I’m too busy.” So, what people realize is that they really need a network they can depend upon. They have to have a network of connections where the trust goes both ways and also knowledge and information go both ways. So, it’s important to have Copyright 2009 Betsey Merkel and I-Open. Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution- Noncommercial-No Derivative Works. Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open) 4415 Euclid Ave 3rd Fl Cleveland, Ohio 44103 USA
    • 2 these strong connections, but it’s also important to have distributed connections. Often, some of the best connections you can have are of high trust that are elsewhere in the country or elsewhere in the city, or elsewhere in the industry that you are in. Because if two people work together in the same place, in the same industry, in the same office, there’s a good chance they have a highly similar network. So, the people that you know or the people that I know and that’s good and feels warm and comfortable everybody knows each other but from a business perspective, that’s not an ideal situation. What you like to have are key connections in different cities, different locations, because what happens is in these different locations, there are different social circles that get formed and there are different communities that get formed and there’s different information that flows around those and so that’s why this whole concept of weak ties has come up because weak ties are actually not connections with people you don’t know well, it’s connections with people that you do know well that trust you but that are far away so you do not have a lot of interaction. [14:50:03] So, it’s important to have these kinds of connections called weak ties because what these are, are connections you have with people in other places. The reason they’re called weak ties is because they are connections you don’t activate a lot. They stay mostly dormant but these are people you mostly know well, they trust you and you trust them. So, they could be like a former College roommate, or former College friends, or people that you grew up with or people you worked with at a prior employer and you really liked these people and you really got along with them well and so you stayed in contact. So everybody knows each other and everybody knows each other well and trusts each other, so when you are looking for a job, it’s like, “Oh, okay, well I know this person and I trust this person and I don’t mind talking to my boss about this person to get them a job.” Whereas if a stranger were to ask that, we would say, “Well, geez, I really don’t know this person, I met them once, they seemed like a nice guy, but I don’t know if I want to go out on a limb with my boss. It may be a tough economic environment to suggest somebody that I don’t really know. Because if this person ends up being a jerk, it not only looks bad on him but it looks bad on me. Also my boss says, “What are you doing? Why are you recommending people who aren’t working out?’ People don’t want to get in that kind of situation and they tend to be real careful. The tougher economic times we have, the more careful people are. They want to take less risk so they would recommend these people that they know well. So, you have this network where you have these strong connections both locally and globally and globally, I mean basically outside your neighborhood, outside your city and this helps you get things done. As an entrepreneur, it helps me understand what is going on in the world because I have these little sensors planted throughout the country, throughout the hemisphere over in Europe, over in Asia, and people are telling me what’s going on locally and it’s good to have that kind of knowledge coming in. It’s also good to know what’s going on, but then also be able to do something with it. So, when you have this strategic network what it usually has, is that you have this local network of people you know well, that you do things with, that you can execute things with, and then you have this distributed network, which is more for exploration. So you’ve got these two “E’s”, exploration, the wider network that’s paying attention to what is going on in the Copyright 2009 Betsey Merkel and I-Open. Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution- Noncommercial-No Derivative Works. Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open) 4415 Euclid Ave 3rd Fl Cleveland, Ohio 44103 USA
    • 3 world, paying attention to what’s going on in the Internet, paying attention to what is going on in this conference and that conference, and this council meeting and that state legislature and things like that, and then you have this local group where you get things done, these are people you are used to working with, these are people you’ve done projects with before, these are people who you’ve had successes with before. When you have this core periphery network, you have this ideal network. You are strong locally, you are strong with getting things done, and you are also strong globally with knowing what needs to be done. So, if you have just the periphery, you may have lots of great ideas and lots of new things come up, but you have no way to execute on them. If you have just the core, you end up doing what you’ve been doing all along, and you are probably doing it very well, but it may be the wrong thing. You need to have both this external monitoring situation and this internal execution of getting things done. We find these types of networks work well for entrepreneurs, they work well for civic communities, they work well for regions, especially with different core periphery networks in different parts of the region intersect and overlap and they also work well in the corporate world because in the corporate world, these kinds of networks help break up the silos that we have in organizations, with this part of the organization is not talking to this part of the organization and so on. These wise ranging distributed networks tend to alleviate that problem. Our generous thanks to Valdis Krebs http://www.orgnet.com The Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open) 4415 Euclid Ave 3rd Floor Cleveland Ohio 44103 USA Copyright 2009 I-Open http://i-open.org Creative Commons License Attribution-Noncommercial No Derivative Works 3.0 United States Related I-Open Interviews • Insights from Valdis Krebs: Networks of Corruption, Employment Networks, and Innovations in Network Research [00:27:58] Vimeo, Livestream • Learning from Corruption Networks [00:10:17] Livestream, Vimeo, You Tube • Building Employment Networks [00:10:17:00] Vimeo, Livestream • Network Research Innovations [00:08:19] Tube, Vimeo, Livestream • Social Network Analysis 1997 – 2007 Valdis Krebs Part 1 Defrag Conference 2007 Livestream, Vimeo • Social Network Analysis 1997 – 2007 Valdis Krebs Part 2 Defrag Conference 2007 Livestream, Vimeo Articles • Social Networks – the new front in the war on terror, Military Tech, CNET News http://news.cnet.com/8301-13639_3-10315748-42.html • Fireside Chat with Ed & Valdis – First of a series of chats on leading edge ideas in regional economic development with Ed Morrison and Valdis Krebs Copyright 2009 Betsey Merkel and I-Open. Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution- Noncommercial-No Derivative Works. Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open) 4415 Euclid Ave 3rd Fl Cleveland, Ohio 44103 USA
    • 4 http://www.thenetworkthinker.com/2009/08/fireside-chat-with-ed-valdis.html Contact Information Valdis Krebs E-mail: valdiskrebs@orgnet.com Twitter: ValdisKrebs Copyright 2009 Betsey Merkel and I-Open. Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution- Noncommercial-No Derivative Works. Institute for Open Economic Networks (I-Open) 4415 Euclid Ave 3rd Fl Cleveland, Ohio 44103 USA