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  • Hello, everyone. My name is Eric Weaver and I am a digital strategist and account director for Tribal DDB Canada. We are the digital marketing division of DDB. I’m here to talk to you today about how PEOPLE have become the media, and how you can better present and extend your value using engagement, influence and activation.I'd like to thank my DDB Edmonton colleagues for having me, and to thank YOU for taking the time out from your busy days to attend this presentation.
  • They’re asking us questions like, am I doing this right? Should I expect more? Will this live up to its promise?Welcome to the club. We’re all riding this bus that’s rocketing toward some unknown destination. Because no one has seen anything like this in the history of marketing.
  • The social web is part of a much broader cultural shift, a profound one, that is absolutely transforming our society.I’m fortunate: for years, my job has been to investigate new technologies for my clients to see which ones have legs and which ones are just fads. So I test everything through my own BS filter. And I can tell you that this is perhaps the most exciting time in marketing. The numbers are astounding.
  • How many of you have joined LinkedIn? More importantly, how many of you have created LinkedIn profiles for your business?That’s good because every day, more than 67,000 people join Linkedin.
  • And then there’s Facebook. Any guess as to how many people are now members? That’s right: a half a billion people.
  • Every day, more than 830 THOUSAND people join Facebook. Every day, I’ve been told, they add three floors of data center space. Never before in history have so many people joined one website. And to put things into perspective, imagine every single man, woman and child in Edmonton and several suburbs joining Facebook each day. That is a hugely significant number.
  • And these are not short checkins each day, or rare visits every week or so. The average Facebook user spends a total of 55 minutes on Facebook each day. Multiply that times hundreds of millions of people and you have a tremendous amount of time, attention and trust.
  • How many of you have a fan page on Facebook? More than 1.5 million organizations do. And did you know that every day, more than 20 MILLION people fan something? They tie their personal identity, their online affinity, to something. That’s powerful.
  • So they’re fanning. On the consumer side, how does that help business? It turns out that people are more likely to buy if they are engaged within social sites. 50% reported this year that they are more likely to buy from you if you live where they live online. During the greatest recession of our lives, this is a significant number.
  • Not only are they more likely to purchase, but they’re more likely to act. If you use Facebook Connect to join a site, vs creating and remembering another username and password, Facebook has found an uptake of four times the number of people who will go ahead and sign up for membership within a third-party site.
  • These online “fannings” are more than a click of a Join button. They become touchpoints on someone’s Facebook wall. And not just there. Consumers are creating brand representations and touchpoints around YOUR BRAND, everywhere. McKinsey estimates that 66% of all touchpoints are now generated by customers! I used to be the guy making those touchpoints! Not any more. Your brand has become OUR brand, owned by the collective We.
  • In the past, we really had a captive audience, but now it’s much more active. Consumers deferred to powerful brand messages, but now they refer to friends and peers. In this new environment, groups we once looked at as herds now act much more like a swarm: one moving in its own direction, unguided by fences, barbed wire or reins.
  • The power of the swarm is evidenced by what we’re seeing in some channels.I used to create shiny, interactive banners that tried to get your attention. They had Flash, they had video, they had quizzes. They were cool! But nowadays, they have an abysmal .19% clickthrough. Those customer-generated touchpoints now include things like Facebook Wall Posts. So I might fan Virgin America and as my friend, you might see that and wonder about it. Because of that inherent trust, wall posts have a 6.49% clickthrough. 34x the standard clickthrough of a banner.
  • So why are some things working and some not so much? Let’s take a fresh look at our profession.
  • Let’s take a quick quiz. Winston tastes good like…
  • Maxwell House Coffee is …
  • Trust isn’t just some secondary lever. On the commercial side, consumers are telling us it’s perhaps the most important.91% of people surveyed globally will buy from a company based on their trust of that company. And here’s the kicker: 77% of people surveyed refuse to buy from companies they distrust. So of all these levers, trust is the one that drives preference. Trust drives transactions.
  • You can see how things have changed just in the last four years. While quality products still drive reputation, trust-related issues have moved to the forefront. Financial returns, once very important, have dropped as a reputational driver. And which media help convey three of the top four drivers? Social media.
  • My mom is not a believer in the internet. In fact she says things like, “oh that internet. Lots of bad people hang out there.” And so I tell her, “yeah, thank god they don’t use telephones. Or Freeways.”Many boomers like me are also skeptical of the value of all these social tools. Here’s why.
  • Boomer-era marketers often see social as an add-on, one more thing to do in a time- and attention-starved job.I remember graphic designers back in the 80s saying the Mac was a toy, refusing to adopt the computer and exclaiming how true artists used hand-held tools. They’re mostly out of work. I remember my CFO telling me I was nuts for wanting to create internet email capability for my agency; “we have a perfectly good voicemail and fax system.” And marketing directors confused as to why they needed to hire programmers. It’s natural to resist change; but that often has a great cost.
  • Many people quote-unquote GET ON social media by creating a Twitter account and or a fan page for their business. They might upload some content to YouTube, they might do some Google searches to try to see what comes up around their brand but basically, they’re pulling 2 levers. They’re still subscribing to the outbound model.In fact, we see several more steps beyond publishing.
  • First, study and plan. it’s important to know your organization’s goals. I know lots of marketers who know that a quarterly sales target is important or that they need to reduce calls to the call center. But what about the overall organization? How can these goals be supercharged through social media? (TALK TO THE REST)
  • There are lots of great resources out there but these are the ones we’ve found most helpful.
  • But we advise caution in terms of who you turn to and study.In April 2009, social media strategist BL Ochman found around 4500 self-described GURUS were on Twitter. Expert, superstar, rockstar, sensei, ninja, and yes, even SOCIAL MEDIA JEDI MASTER. Then Oprah got on Twitter and sent her first tweet. And within a few months the number of newly-minted gurus jumped to 16000. That translates to about 54 new gurus per day. It’s a bit of a joke. Someone’s ability to self-promote does not equate to success in or knowledge of social tools or sites.
  • Step 2 is to listen. We recommend doing this before you publish. Why? Because your time and energy and budgets are finite and content that doesn’t follow your plan or doesn’t leverage your audience’s desires can become expensive noise. (TALK TO REST)
  • Many organizations have started this journey without an ear to the ground. As of November, 54% of companies in a recent survey indicated they are monitoring the social space. That means another 46% don’t even do that! You can’t intercept PR or brand crises if you don’t know they’re happening.
  • This is a website called Lookbook. On it, Millennials create their own amateur fashion spreads using famous brands. They tag these brands, along with the type of print, material, and colors and place their photos online where other Millennials rate their look. Talk about putting yourself out there! In this spread, a young would-be model from Des Moines is showing off a Penguin brand shirt, owned by my client Perry Ellis. The company had no idea that their brand was being marketed, by young people, to other young people, in a very real, very authentic way. By hearing, we can identify influencers and advocates and empower them.
  • There are a number of free tools that let you monitor your brand’s online mentions and hence reputation. They are
  • Paid tools generally provide a lot better information, in fact, we recommend them like a Forrester membership. They provide incredibly valuable market intelligence and are worth the cost. These companies get select datasets from companies like Facebook and Google and have deeper pools of data to work with.
  • Here’s an example of a ScoutLabs report on NAIT. You can see sentiment changing over time, the general level of buzz, mentions and quotes.
  • One of the interesting features of ScoutLabs is its ability to assign various quotes, posts and content to monitoring team members, who can respond to individuals, tracking that activity.
  • If you have a local business like a retail store, you’ll find increasing references to it on Yelp, CitySearch and social games like FourSquare, where people will check in at your place of business and provide feedback, tips, watchouts and rants. Many organizations don’t think to check these local sites for references, and miss the opportunity to engage, respond and correct perception there.
  • Listening is great but you can’t join a conversation if you don’t have an entry point: in other words, if you’re not at the party with an active, engaging social media presence. You have to be publishing.
  • Many of you are already publishing. We encourage our clients to create content that respects time starvation. Make it highly tagged and consumed. Build trust through proof points. Build utility through guides and how-tos that transcend a mere brand offering. And think about it as something at the end of a someone’s search, not an interruption along the way.
  • Create the right content, conversation and conditions to elicit engagement and interaction rather than just consumption. But make sure you’ve created organizational responses so that people know how to engage, how not to engage, and when.
  • This engagement process document used by the US Air Force is so thoughtful it’s been used by countless companies in determining an initial approach to engaging stakeholders both on internal and external sites.
  • With posts on your organization’s site, you may want to do things a tad differently. For example, you may want to respond to every single comment, vs on social venues.
  • Realities: Anyone can edit. All edits are tracked There are thousands of people who spend hours and hours correcting articles. It’s often based on whimsy. Companies MUST be absolutely transparent about their edits and must accompany them with annotations/citations.
  • Realities: Anyone can edit. All edits are tracked There are thousands of people who spend hours and hours correcting articles. It’s often based on whimsy. Companies MUST be absolutely transparent about their edits and must accompany them with annotations/citations.
  • What you publish or edit can be tracked, and if you are caught editing, the resulting outing will be loud, memorable and negative.
  • What you publish or edit can be tracked, and if you are caught editing, the resulting outing will be loud, memorable and negative.
  • Apple, Dell, Microsoft and many others have been busted clandestinely altering their wiki pages. Bad idea. Why destroy trust through covert ops? This is when social media will backfire against you in a huge way.
  • We’ve been talking about the swarm. Like flocks of birds, people, perception and opinion often change course en-masse without a leader or a top-down mechanism driving this change. They gravitate in various directions. Our goal is to create influence among many by making our content and conversation easily liked, fanned, and forwarded to others.
  • Influence is happening everywhere, constantly. On Facebook, for example, people are sharing links, photos, videos, posts – pretty much any and everything – to the tune of 25 billion items per month. Your brand, your value, your content – should be compelling enough to be part of this massive sharing.
  • Here’s a great example of influence. Recently Virgin America tried out the Promoted Tweets channel in which VA tweets appeared in your stream based on what you searched on. They offered a limited number of discount codes for 50% off a companion ticket, which were reshared over and over. This had an instant and dramatic effect on their bottom line.They also created a hashtag called #NowPlaying to encourage in-flight users to share the movies they were watching, specifically to increase engagement, and leveraging influence to spread the offer.
  • Creative content, when shared amongst influencers, can also have a very large and negative impact to both bottom line and online reputation. Influence has HUGE power and organizations should be prepared to put out reputational fires with “social media water.”Creativity is a huge factor in buzz-building, engagement and influence. And when you don’t engage, people can use creativity to really make an impact in your business.
  • Here’s an example of an opportunistic influence campaign we did for Canadian Tourism, that we called Ola Palooza. The idea was to find a way to get Mexican travelers talking and referring Canada as a travel destination to friends and peers.
  • And finally, once we have influenced, what actions have been generated? How have we activated our audience? Have they been inspired enough to advocate our offering? And how do their actions amplify and reverberate online? Or perhaps the action we want to inspire is internal amongst employees.
  • Just before the Consumer Electronics Show this month, Kodak CMO Jeffrey Hayzlett asked his users over Twitter what they would call the latest waterproof version of their ZI-8 pocket hi-def video camera. The winner would win a free trip to Vegas to join Jeffrey as they unveiled the new camera to thousands of attendees. Jeffrey said: Kodak used Twitter to get people to not just read or comment, but to do something; in this case, helping name their product. Great example of activating your market around your product.
  • In addition to the traditional media work, DDB came up with the plan to give Salty a life after being snubbed. We built presences on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and even ChatRoulette!We engaged with people directly through the “voice” of Salty to raise brand awareness and engage users, influence their behavior and activate them to create fan content.
  • In addition to the traditional media work, DDB came up with the plan to give Salty a life after being snubbed. We built presences on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and even ChatRoulette!We engaged with people directly through the “voice” of Salty to raise brand awareness and engage users, influence their behavior and activate them to create fan content.
  • In addition to the traditional media work, DDB came up with the plan to give Salty a life after being snubbed. We built presences on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and even ChatRoulette!We engaged with people directly through the “voice” of Salty to raise brand awareness and engage users, influence their behavior and activate them to create fan content.
  • In addition to the traditional media work, DDB came up with the plan to give Salty a life after being snubbed. We built presences on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and even ChatRoulette!We engaged with people directly through the “voice” of Salty to raise brand awareness and engage users, influence their behavior and activate them to create fan content.
  • The response has been incredible. Salty has been featured in numerous blogs and in traditional press, but also we’ve inspired people to create their own content. So people have shot and uploaded their own YouTube videos (some with thousands of views), creating and posting fan art, even buying the shakers and posing them in fan photos.
  • The response has been incredible. Salty has been featured in numerous blogs and in traditional press, but also we’ve inspired people to create their own content. So people have shot and uploaded their own YouTube videos (some with thousands of views), creating and posting fan art, even buying the shakers and posing them in fan photos.
  • The response has been incredible. Salty has been featured in numerous blogs and in traditional press, but also we’ve inspired people to create their own content. So people have shot and uploaded their own YouTube videos (some with thousands of views), creating and posting fan art, even buying the shakers and posing them in fan photos.
  • The response has been incredible. Salty has been featured in numerous blogs and in traditional press, but also we’ve inspired people to create their own content. So people have shot and uploaded their own YouTube videos (some with thousands of views), creating and posting fan art, even buying the shakers and posing them in fan photos.
  • The response has been incredible. Salty has been featured in numerous blogs and in traditional press, but also we’ve inspired people to create their own content. So people have shot and uploaded their own YouTube videos (some with thousands of views), creating and posting fan art, even buying the shakers and posing them in fan photos.
  • And our results have been incredible too.
  • This campaign shows that traditional and social media actually reinforce one another. Traditional media can build mass awareness through creativity and emphasizing trust messages, super-charging the conversation around a brand. Social media can both seed the social space with media that audiences can talk about and share, building influence and activation, and can sustain the conversation started in traditional long after the campaign has ended and the commercials have been pulled from rotation.
  • Social tools can also be used to build trust all along the purchase funnel, motivating consumers to get past time- and attention-starvation. Traditional media, done smartly, can provide air cover while social sites can steer the swarm, coach the dialogue, provide value and amplify brand enthusiasm.This is a integrated mix we did for Nature’s Path Foods, to help determine where time and energy should be spent in terms of media creation and placement.
  • Here’s another integrated campaign we did for Canadian Tourism. The idea was to crowdsource destinations from the people who know Canada best: Canadians. We created a site for consumers to upload their own video spots for special destinations they loved. We also brought awareness of the effort through traditional channels: outdoor, online, broadcast and inserts. The results were far better than we expected. People — and the places they love — became the media.
  • So there you have it. Six steps by which we would encourage you to leverage social channels. I’d encourage you to think beyond studying and publishing to look for ways to get into engagement, influence and activation. And here are some tips.

Edmontonslideshare 100428213928-phpapp01 Edmontonslideshare 100428213928-phpapp01 Presentation Transcript

  • PEOPLE ARE THE MEDIA:
    ENGAGEMENT, INFLUENCE, ACTIVATION
    ERIC WEAVER, TRIBAL DDB CANADA
  • 2
    ?
    YOU’RE ON LINKEDIN.
    YOU’RE TWEETING. SET UP A FAN PAGE. POSTED SOME VIDEOS TO YOUTUBE.
    IF YOU’RE LIKE MANY OTHERS, YOU’RE ASKING…
    NOW WHAT?
  • 3
    ?
    AM I DOING THIS RIGHT?SHOULD I BE EXPECTING MORE FANS? MORE DIALOGUE?WILL MORE PEOPLE EVENTUALLY “SEE” US?
  • WE ARE IN THE MIDST OF A PROFOUND CULTURALSHIFT
    4
  • 5
    NUMBER OF PEOPLE JOINING LINKEDIN DAILY
    67,000+
  • PEOPLE ON FACEBOOK
    500,
    000,
    000
    6
    SOURCE: FACEBOOK
  • 830,000+PEOPLE JOIN FACEBOOK EVERY SINGLE DAY
    7
    2006 POPULATION OF EDMONTON
    730,372
  • 55
    NUMBER OF
    MINUTES THE AVERAGE USER
    SPENDS EACH DAY ON FACEBOOK
    8
  • 1,500,000+ORGANIZATIONS HAVE A FACEBOOK FAN PAGE
    9
    20,000,000+PEOPLE JOIN A FAN PAGE EVERY DAY
  • 50%
    PEOPLE WHO ARE MORE LIKELY TO BUY IF ENGAGED VIA SOCIAL SITES
    10
    CHADWICK MARTIN BAILEY, FEB 2010
  • 11
    4x
    LIKELIHOOD OF JOINING A SITE VIA FACEBOOK CONNECT VS NORMAL SIGNUP
    FACEBOOK, APRIL 2010
  • 12
    66% PERCENTAGE OF BRAND TOUCHPOINTS ARE NOW GENERATED BY CUSTOMERS
    MCKINSEY QUARTERLY, JULY 2009
  • 13
    Captive audiences have given way to active ones. Customers deferred to big brands for value messages – now we refer to our friends.And advertisers often treated audiences like herd animals –in reality they act much more like a swarm.
    CAPTIVE > ACTIVE
    DEFERENCE > REFERENCE
    HERD > SWARM
    FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/RREIS
    FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/HUTCHIKE
  • 14
    CLICKTHROUGH RATE FOR AVERAGE BANNER AD
    0.19%
    FORRESTER, 2008
    CLICKTHROUGH FOR AVG FACEBOOK WALL POST
    6.49%
    VITRUE, AUGUST 2009
  • LET’S TAKE A FRESH LOOK AT THIS BUSINESS OF MARKETING
    15
  • 16
    CONVEYING VALUE THROUGH OUTBOUND MARKETING HAS WORKED FOR 150 YEARS
    EVERY NICHE HAS EVOLVED INTO A SOPHISTICATED CHANNEL
    EFFECTIVE MARKET IMPACT EQUALS JOB SECURITY
  • WINSTON TASTES GOOD LIKEA ______________________
    17
  • 18
  • MAXWELL HOUSE:GOOD TO _________
    19
  • (?)
    20
    MONOLITHIC MESSAGES WORKED WHEN WE HAD:
    Limited product choice
    Limited media channels
    Longer brand interactions
    Higher barriers to entry
  • ORGANIC, SOCIALLy-JUST, SOY HALF-CAFF, MOCHA FRAPPA WHATEV…NO FOAM NO WHIP NO SLEEVE
    21
  • THE CONSUMER IS NOW FIRMLY IN CONTROL
    22
    CONSUMER ABILITY TO PUBLISH
    We can’t fight time starvation. Attention is a tough ask. Can’t stop product choice or media clutter. But we CAN leverage consumer publishing and build trust.
    ORIGINAL VERSION: AGENT WILDFIRE
  • 91%OF PEOPLE GLOBALLY WILL BUY FROM COMPANIES BASED ON TRUST
    23
    77%PEOPLE WHO REFUSE TO BUY FROM COMPANIES THEY DISTRUST
    EDELMAN PR, 2009
  • CHANGING PRIORITIES: “How important are these factors to corporate reputation?”
    24
    US 2010
    US 2006
    Quality products & services
    Attentive to customer needs
    Strong financial performance
    Fair pricing
    A well-known brand
    Good employee relations
    Socially responsible
    Visible CEO
    Dialogue with stakeholders
    Employee/CEO blogs
    53%
    Transparent & honest practices
    Company I can trust
    High-quality products/services
    Communicates frequently
    Treats employees well
    Good corporate citizen
    Prices fairly
    Innovator
    Top leadership
    Financial returns
    83%
    47%
    83%
    42%
    79%
    38%
    75%
    37%
    72%
    35%
    64%
    33%
    58%
    23%
    48%
    23%
    47%
    12%
    45%
    These three key factors are best served by social content.
    EDELMAN TRUST BAROMETER, 2010
  • 25
    TRUST IS TODAY’S KEY TO REVENUE, AND SOCIAL CHANNELS ENABLE US TO ENGAGE IN WAYS THAT BUILD TRUST—AND LEVERAGE THE PRE-EXISTING TRUST BETWEEN PEERS.
    FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/POWERBOOKTRANCE
  • MANY REMAIN SKEPTICAL
    26
    PHOTO: FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/YUGENRO
  • 27
    BOOMERS
    All about propriety. We were trained in formalities, taught to never offend. Oversharing is “weak.” Guarded = safe. And your suit & tie is a sign of trustworthiness.
    GENS X&Y
    All about affinity. Formalities are ignored, sharing means being found, and they grew up with Google. Your suit & tie = untrustworthy.
    2010THE YEAR MILLENIALS WILL SURPASS BOOMERS IN THE WORKFORCE
    PHOTO: FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/KATINALYNN
  • Computer-based
    graphic design, 1986
    Email marketing, 1996
    MANY MORE FEEL THEY DON’T HAVE TIME FOR “ONE MORE THING.”
    Web marketing, 1997
    28
    Remember the graphic designers who refused to adapt to a computer? I remember my CFO asking why we needed Internet email. And remember when we started needing programmers in Marketing? Time to adapt again.
  • SO HOW DO I TAKE MY ORGANIZATION’S SOCIAL MEDIA TO THE NEXT LEVEL?
    29
  • DDB° SIX STEPS TO SOCIAL
    30
    1. STUDY2. LISTEN3. PUBLISH4. ENGAGE5. INFLUENCE6. ACTIVATE
  • STUDY & PLAN
    31
    KNOW YOUR ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS
    KNOW YOUR BRAND VOICE AND MANNER
    LEAD THE CONVERSATION WITH LEGAL ABOUT RISK & PRIVACY
    DETERMINE INQUIRY HANDLING
    DETERMINE EMPLOYEE GOVERNANCE
    PLAN FOR REPUTATIONAL CRISES
    DETERMINE METRICS
    1
  • 1
    STUDY & PLAN
    32
    MASHABLE.COM
    CASESTUDIESONLINE.COM
    SOCIALMEDIAGOVERNANCE.COM
    WOMMA.ORG
    FORRESTER MARKETING SUMMIT
    @KDPAINE
    @JOWYANG
    @ARMANO
    @AMBERCADABRA
  • 33
    APRIL 20094,487 GURUS
    DECEMBER 200916,000 GURUS
    BL OCHMAN, DEC 2009
    Be careful of whom you turn to.
  • 2
    LISTEN
    34
    NOW THAT WE UNDERSTAND THE RISKS AND REWARDS, WHAT SHOULD WE LISTEN FOR?
    RAPID RESPONSE TO PR CRISES, SALES OPPORTUNITIES
    DETERMINE SENTIMENT, MOTIVE, ASSOCIATED TOPICS, SHARE OF VOICE
    CORRECT MISPERCEPTIONS
    IDENTIFY BRAND CHAMPIONS
  • PERCENTAGE OF COMPANIES THATHAVE IMPLEMENTED SOCIAL MONITORING PLATFORMS54%
    PERCENTAGE THAT HAVE NO IDEA
    46%
    E-CONSULTANCY, SOCIAL MEDIA AND PR REPORT, NOVEMBER 2009
    35
  • 36
    LOOKBOOK.NU
    LEVERAGE CO-CREATION
    OPPORTUNITIES
  • FREEBIES
    37
    GOOGLE ALERTS
    SAMEPOINT
    SOCIALMENTION
    BLOGPULSE
    TECHNORATI
    FILTRBOX
    YACKTRACK
    TWITTER SEARCH
    TWENDZ
    Limited data, limited insights
  • PAID TOOLS
    38
    SAS SMA
    CYMFONY
    VISIBLE TECHNOLOGIES
    RADIAN6
    SYSOMOS
    SCOUTLABS
    MOTIVEQUEST
    LIFT9
    Deeper data samples; better results; partnerships with Google, Facebook; rich media & comments; multiple languages
  • 39
    SCOUTLABS
  • 40
    SCOUTLABS
  • 41
  • 42
    YOU CAN’T JOIN A CONVERSATION ABOUT YOUR OFFERING WITHOUT AN ENTRY POINT.
  • NOW THAT WE CAN HEAR OUR MARKET, WHAT SHOULD WE PUBLISH?
    TIME-RESPECTFUL CONTENT, HIGHLY TAGGED AND EASILY CONSUMED
    THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
    PROOF POINTS
    PERSONALITY & STORYTELLING PIECES
    HOW-TOS AND GUIDES
    3
    PUBLISH
    43
  • 4
    NOW THAT WE’RE PUBLISHING, HOW DO WE INTERACT?
    CREATE ENGAGEMENT GUARDRAILS & GOVERNANCE
    CREATE OPPORTUNITIES TO INTERACT WITH THE CONTENT
    HEAR & RESPOND
    ENGAGE
    44
  • ONLINE REPUTATION RESPONSE PROCESS:EXTERNAL SITE / SOCIAL VENUE
    LOCATION
    TYPE OF COMMENT
    45
    ON-SITE POST
    EXTERNAL
    POST
    BASHING / DEGRADING
    RANT / SATIRE
    ERRORS / MISGUIDED
    NEGATIVE EXPERIENCE
    POSITIVE COMMENT?
    TYPE OF RESPONSE
    MONITOR SILENTLY
    CONCUR PUBLICLY
    RESPOND POSITIVELY
    RESPOND WITH FACTS
    RECTIFY EXPERIENCE
    BASED ON US AIR FORCE WEB POSTING RESPONSE ASSESSMENT V2.0
  • LOCATION
    TYPE OF COMMENT
    46
    ONLINE REPUTATION RESPONSE PROCESS:ORGANIZATIONAL SITE
    ON-SITE POST
    EXTERNAL
    POST
    BASHING / DEGRADING
    RANT / SATIRE
    ERRORS / MISGUIDED
    NEGATIVE EXPERIENCE
    POSITIVE COMMENT?
    TYPE OF RESPONSE
    MONITOR SILENTLY
    CONCUR PUBLICLY
    RESPOND POSITIVELY
    RESPOND WITH FACTS
    RECTIFY EXPERIENCE
  • AND THEN THERE’S WIKIPEDIA
    47
  • 48
  • 49
  • 50
  • 51
  • 52
    TOOLS LIKE WIKIWATCHER TRACK CLANDESTINE WIKI EDITING AND LINK CHANGES BACK TO ORGANIZATIONS
    — TRANSPARENCY IS CRUCIAL —
  • 5
    INFLUENCE
    53
    NOW THAT WE’RE INTERACTING, HOW CAN WE CREATE INFLUENCE?
    HOW CAN WE ENABLE LIKING, FANNING, AND FORWARDING?
    HOW CAN WE IDENTIFY THOSE WITH THE GREATEST INFLUENCE AND ENGAGE THEM?
  • 25,000,000,000
    54
    NUMBER OF ITEMS SHARED BY FACEBOOK USERS EVERY MONTH
    FACEBOOK, APRIL 2010
  • 55
    FIFTH HIGHEST SALES DAY EVER FOR VIRGIN AMERICA THROUGH “PROMOTED TWEETS” (APRIL 20, 2010)
  • 56
    UNITED AIRLINES SHARE VALUE LOST DURING “UNITED BREAKS GUITARS”
    $180,000,000
  • 57
  • ACTIVATION
    58
    6
    HOW CAN OUR INFLUENCE INSPIRE ACTION?
    WHAT BRAND OR PRODUCT ADVOCACY HAVE WE GENERATED?
    HOW DO THOSE ACTIONS AMPLIFY OUR VALUE?
  • 59
    “I COULD HAVE JUST NAMED THIS THING THE VX150 OR ZI8. BUT I THOUGHT THAT THE PEOPLE WHO BUY THE PRODUCT SHOULD COME UP WITH SOMETHING MEANINGFUL TO THEM.” – JEFFREY HAYZLETT,CMO, KODAK
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    DDB Canada’s job was to bring Salty to life in social media, to extend the campaign long after the spots had run. Our Radar team engaged on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and even ChatRoulette using Salty’s “voice.”
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    Salty’s been featured in numerous blogs and in traditional press.
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    People have uploaded videos of their kids interacting with the salt shakers – some videos have received thousands of views.
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  • SALTY’S SOCIAL CAMPAIGN RESULTS
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    6000 FACEBOOK FANS
    400,000+ VIDEO VIEWS
    1000 TWITTER FOLLOWERS
    18,000 SALTY & PEP SHAKERS SOLD in FIRST 25 DAYS
    HIGHEST SITE TRAFFIC EVER
    SIDEKICKS SALES ROSE BY 10%
    SIDEKICKS SURPASSED UNCLE BEN’S AS #1 BRAND IN MEAL ACCOMPANIMENTS
  • SALTY’S SOCIAL CAMPAIGN LEARNINGS
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    ENGAGEMENT DEMOGRAPHIC 70% FEMALE, 30% MALE – 62% WERE AGED 25-34
    HUMOROUS TWEETS RECEIVED MORE ATTENTION THAN BRAND MESSAGES
    USERS WERE ATTRACTED MORE TO CONVERSATIONAL TOPICS AND LEADING QUESTIONS
  • TRADITIONAL AND SOCIAL REINFORCE ONE ANOTHER
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    Traditional and social efforts work incredibly well together. Traditional can create and supercharge a conversation, and social can sustain that conversation.
  • BRANDED SITE
    EXTERNAL MKTG-MANAGED PRESENCE
    EXTERNAL THIRD-PARTY SITE
    TRADITIONAL MEDIA/PR
    Integrated Traditional/Social Marketing Mix
    AWARENESS
    NEED
    DETERMINATION
    EVALUATION/COMPARISON
    PURCHASE
    LOYALTY
    TOPICAL COMMUNITIES:
    IP, HELPFUL TIPS
    PRODUCT LAUNCH MICROSITE
    S T O R Y T E L L I N G
    DOT-COM SITE
    HELPFUL RESOURCES
    RECIPES
    SEO
    COMMENTS
    EVENTS
    COMPANY BLOG (IP)
    FACEBOOK FAN PAGE
    ONLINE SAMPLING
    E-COMMERCE PARTNER
    ONLINE
    YOUTUBE CHANNEL: STORYTELLING, IP
    PRINT
    EXTERNAL BLOGS: IP, TIPS
    OUTDOOR
    Social can also help push consumers through the funnel by providing proof points and helpful information at various stages of purchase consideration.
    PR
    SAMPLING PGMS
    RETAIL
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    LocalsKnow.ca: great DDB example of traditional and social media working together to leverage customer co-creation and trust.
  • SUMMARY POINTS
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    AUDIENCES HAVE CHANGED FASTER THAN WE’VE REACTED
    OUR LENSES CLOUD OUR PERCEPTION OF THIS CHANGE
    TRUST DRIVES PREFERENCE, TRANSACTIONS & REPUTATION
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    REEXAMINE MARKETING IN TERMS OF DIALOGUE, TRUST, ENGAGEMENT, INFLUENCE
    CONSIDER A STEPPED APPROACH
    LET YOUR AUDIENCE CO-CREATE
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    SOCIAL AND TRADITIONAL TURBOCHARGE ONE ANOTHER AND SHOULD BE PLANNED TOGETHER
    THINK MARKETING ENERGY, MORE THAN MARKETING SPEND
    GIVE YOURSELF TIME
  • Slideshare.net/weave
  • @weave
    @RADARDDB
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    DDB is the world’s largest advertising agency by revenue, WITH 200 OFFICES IN 90 COUNTRIES.
    TRIBAL DDB is the AWARD-WINNING digital division of DDB, with 56 offices and 1200 employees worldwide.
    RADAR is OUR SOCIAL BUSINESS SPECIALTY AREA. OUR 20-PERSON RADAR DDB TEAM IN VANCOUVER CREATES AWARD-WINNING SOCIAL PROGRAMS FOR NUMEROUS ORGANIZATIONS.
  • THANK YOU.AND QUESTIONS.
  • FOR COUNSEL ON HOW TO SOCIALIZE YOUR ENTERPRISE, CONTACT HELENE LEGGATT AT 780-917-6600.
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