Common formative assessments -sope creek
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Common formative assessments -sope creek

on

  • 661 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
661
Views on SlideShare
540
Embed Views
121

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

1 Embed 121

http://professionallearning.typepad.com 121

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Designed to be used as pre and post to compare same-assessment to same-assessment; apples to apples

Common formative assessments -sope creek Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Presented by: Elizabeth Marsili elizabeth.marsili@cobbk12.org Betsey Kennedy-Olotka elizabeth.kennedy@cobbk12.org
  • 2. 1. What are Common Formative Assessments? 2. Why do we need Common Formative Assessments? What are the benefits to US as teachers? What are the benefits to our students? 3. How do we CREATE Common Formative Assessments? Source: Larry Ainsworth & Donald Viegut, Common Formative Assessments: How to Connect Standards-based Instruction and Assessment (Corwin Press, 2006).
  • 3. True of Common Formative Assessments NOT True of Common Formative Assessments
  • 4. • Periodic, SHORT assessments • Collaboratively designed • Pre- and post• Should represent power (essential) standards • Administered to ALL students in the grade level or course
  • 5. • Combinations of testtype questions including: Selected-response and constructed-response • Results analyzed in DATA TEAMS/PLC’s to guide instruction
  • 6. • • Regular feedback aligned with the most important standards allowing teachers to adjust instruction to meet the diverse needs of the students Ongoing collaboration with teachers in order to determine strategies that will lead to success for all students
  • 7. • Consistency in expectations across the grade level • Agreed on expectations for different levels of proficiency • Deliberate alignment of classroom, school, district and state assessments to better prepare students for success on state assessments.
  • 8. “It is critical that all of the assessed standards be truly significant. From an instructional perspective, it is better for tests to measure a handful of powerful skills accurately than it is for tests to do an inaccurate job of measuring many skills.” ~ W. J. Popham, Test Better, Teach Better, 2003, p. 143