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Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature
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Week 1 and week 2 what is young adult literature

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Young Adult Literature

Young Adult Literature

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  • 1. WEEK 1What is youngadult literature?
  • 2. Why read young adultliterature? Literature transports readers to unknown places and understand what others experience Enhances process of discovery Help Young Adults (YAs) understand self Help YAs see themselves in broader context of their society, culture, world Help YAs fit into their world
  • 3. What is young adult literature? Basically written for young adults from 11 to 18 years YAL written for and about young adult YAL focuses on youthful characters and explores their sense of identity, adventures, dreams and trials YA readers still searching for ideas, values for self identity Young protagonists in books for YA serve as models Teacher is to encourage positive identification
  • 4.  YAL provides opportunities for reader exploration  Heightened self knowledge & personal understanding  Broadens sense of YA’s world  Expands knowledge of events, situations & human interactions  Major themes: rites of passage, search for identity, familial relationships, need for independence, interpersonal relationships
  • 5. Definition of YAL “Young-adult literature is literature wherein the protagonist is either a teenager or one who approaches problems from a teenage perspective. Such novels are generally of moderate length and told from the first person. Typically, they describe initiation into the adult world, or the surmounting of a contemporary problem forced upon the protagonist(s) by the adult world. Though generally written for a teenage reader, such novels-like all fine literature-address the entire spectrum of life” -G. Robert Carlson
  • 6. When is a novel about young adult is not YA novel? Depends on perspective Apprenticeship novel- recounts the struggle of protagonist to come of age and gains awareness of the world (Adult novel- perspective of adult looking back) YA novel- perspective of youthful characters as they explore their world(in real time) BUT IT IS A QUESTION OF INTEREST
  • 7.  “Any book that holds a young person’s interest, that portrays the human condition with care and is well crafted, could and should be a young adult novel. The categories of books are more a marketing device than a limit to the appeal a book might have. If the characters and situations in a novel are relevant and meaningful to the teenager, that’s the book he or she will read.” -Sue Ellen Bridges
  • 8. YAL as transitional literature YAL can serve as bridge to more mature novels YAL shorter, less complex but well-written YAL introduces YA to forms and elements of fiction
  • 9. Pairing and core methods Method for introducing YAL as “holding ground” before reading adult literature Pairing- one YA novel to an adult novel  Pairing system can be used to match books or authors Core method- one adult novel and a number of young adult novels that can relate to it
  • 10. Pair method YA novel Adult novel
  • 11. Core method YA Novel YA Adult YANovel Novel Novel YA Novel
  • 12.  Students move through three reading stages  BuildingFluency State  Reading for Pleasure/Reading to Learn  Mature Reading With this knowledge teacher is able to find challenging and entertaining reading materials
  • 13. Describing adolescents Physical  Physical changes are rapid and visually apparent  Diversity in physical developmental rates  Distinct gender differences (girls 12, boys 14)  Health risks due to behavioral issues- eating disorders, sexual experimentation, drug use
  • 14.  Psychosocial  Friendships formed and social interaction increases  Distinct gender differences in socialisation patterns (girls have smaller circle of close friends, boys larger)  Affiliation shifts from parents to friends  Social tasks and situations handled w/o adult supervision/advice  Self-esteem changes due to home and school lives  Preoccupations with self lead to critical self- examination and to self-perception  Argumentative and aggressive behaviours
  • 15.  Cognitive  Higher level of cognitive functioning develops (reasoning/higher level thought processes)  Moral/ethical choices guide behavior  Developmental diversity leads to varying abilities to think and reason  Cognitive ability often affected by overall socialization  Perspectives about past, present, future develop allowing enhanced perspectives of time  Increase in language and verbalization skills allowing improved communication
  • 16. Summary YA literature focuses on lives, experiences, problems, and aspirations of young people Vital addition to literature curriculum YA literature provides role models for young people to identify with Has potential to help them expand their knowledge and understanding of themselves, others, and the world
  • 17. DISCUSSION TOPICS Describe a rationale for using young adult literature How would you define young adult literature to someone who is unaware of its existence?
  • 18. THE END
  • 19. WEEK 2EXPLORING BOOKS
  • 20. TYPES OF LITERATURE Realistic fiction  Biography and Humour autobiography Mystery  Informational books Fantasy  Poetry Science fiction  Short stories Historical fiction  Drama Nonfiction  Picture books
  • 21. Looking at fictionHistorical Realistic Science fiction fantasyfiction fiction • past • present • future • imaginary
  • 22. Realistic fiction Reflects contemporary world Believable plot an lifelike characters Familiar settings Realism-reflects writer’s perspective in creating characters and situations as if they existed Characters developed with reasonable and believable conflicts cont…
  • 23. Realistic fiction Most important aspect is effectiveness of characters Characters- fully developed, believable Part of credibility is their fallibility but ability to learn from mistakes Impetus for growth and change Themes: alienation, search for identity, importance of friendship, dealing and accepting change, changing roles of family Example: Catcher in the Rye by J.D Salinger
  • 24. Humour Realistic works but humorous But humour is not confined to realism only Authors inject humour in other genres as well
  • 25. Mystery Depends on carefully crafted plots with surprises, twists and turns, and clues Mystery can be set in any time- historical, science fiction, fantasy Characteristics: fast-moving and suspenseful plots, realistic dialogue, perplexing incidents
  • 26. Relationship of Mystery to Other Types of Fiction fantasy Historical Science fiction mystery fiction Realistic fiction
  • 27. fantasy Combines realistic fiction with realm of make- believe  Basic sense of believability with well-constructed plot, well-developed characters, and setting from which characters may logically move into imaginary world (The Chronicles of Narnia)  High fantasy-mythology with imaginary creatures (Lord of the Rings) cont…
  • 28. fantasy Concept of “fight a good fight”  Hero against villain  Quest for truth  Classic confrontations with strange, imaginary beasts
  • 29. Science fiction Definition: combination of characters and their relationships with plausible accounts of science, technology and futurism May present moral or ethical dilemmas to explore (involves use of technology on humans/animals, conflicts between competing interests, ecological disasters) Always set in the future with characters as pioneers exploring new worlds Also depends on logical, plausible explanations for scientific details and inventions cont….
  • 30. Science fiction Other major themes:  Creation of utopian communities  Threats to existence of our planet Science fiction presents adventure, excitement, entertainment, conflict, and a look at what future might bring
  • 31. Historical fiction Provides factual framework for a story Characteristics:  Authenticity of detail about period  Historical figures consistent with documented actions and words  Accuracy of chronology of events  Believable characters  Relevance of story to current times, attitudes, and beliefs as well as to the historical period  Vivid and accurate sense of history cont….
  • 32. Historical fiction Themes:  Character confronting himself/herself  Character confronting society  Opportunities to reflect upon values, problems, moral dilemmas and issues of the novel’s time
  • 33. Nonfiction Biography and autobiography  Nonfiction accounts of lives of individuals  Reveal vital relationship between individual and time period he/she lives  Frequent presentation of conflicts character must overcome Informational books  Two primary reason  Gain satisfaction of learning new information  Satisfaction of reaffirming what is already known  Virtually every topic
  • 34. Other Types of Literature Poetry  Normally receives negative reaction from students (why?)  Poems should be accessible to students- they could understand, experience and enjoy Short stories  Most short stories not meant for YA  Teacher should be able to evaluate short stories suitable for YA cont….
  • 35. Other Types of Literature Drama  Neglected field for YA  Teacher has to be able to evaluate and choose for YA Picture Books/Comics/Graphics  Strongvisual content  May cover any topic and concern  Appeal to YA due to visuals and easy readibility
  • 36.  BOOKS:  The Vampire Diaries by LJ Smith  A Walk to Remember by Nicholas Sparks  Millie and the Night Heron by Catherine Bateson  Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by JK Rowling  High School Musical by Peter Barsocchini  Boy Overboard by Morris Gleitzman  The Fifth Quest by Debra Oswald
  • 37. Looking at characters in YALiterature  Dealing with issues of identity  Seeking a sense of independence  Increasing reliance on the peer group  Accepting psychological changes and emerging sexuality  Learning to relate appropriately to members of the opposite sex  Planning for future careers  Making decisions about education
  • 38.  Determining values, ethics, morals, and political views Renegotiating relationship with parents Conditions facing students Differing opportunities and roles for women Changing family structures Increasing awareness and sensitivity to ethnic and cultural diversity Addressing use of drugs and alcohol
  • 39. Summary The genre of YA literature comprises a range of types of works Teachers need to continue to explore the field and to read widely to incorporate YA to meet students’ needs
  • 40. DISCUSSION TOPICS Discuss what type of literature you enjoy the most and why? What type of you enjoyed when you were an adolescent? What are the differences in your reading selection?
  • 41. THE END

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