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Fireman Clothing

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Common and basic materials used in making fireman clothing

Common and basic materials used in making fireman clothing

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  • 1. FIREMANCLOTHThe MaterialsBehind It Biomaterial Engineering Group IP #5 31 October 2012
  • 2. THE FULL CLOTHING OF A FIREMAN1. Hood 4. Insulated pants 5. Boots 6. Helmet 7. Goggle 11. Insulated leather gloves12. Insulated coat 13. Positive-pressure mask 14. Respirator
  • 3. Kevlar © Aka Poly-para-phenylene terephthalamide Para-amid (aromatic polyamide) synthetic fiber polymer Created by Stephanie [-CO-C6H4-CO-NH-C6H4-NH-]n Kwolek in 1965 at DuPont Synthesized in solution from 1,4-phenylene- diamine and terephthaloyl chloride in condensation reaction
  • 4. Kevlar © Characteristics  Strong but relatively light (tensile strength: 3620 Mpa)  Specific gravity: 1.45  Does not melt like usual plastic  Decomposes only at about 450°C  “Cryogenically stronger” – strongest at -196°C  Resists attacks from acid, base and chemicals (long exposure will degrades)  Long exposure to UV causes degradation  Properties unaffected by water  Can be ignited but can be put out quite easily
  • 5. Kevlar © Other Applications:  Cryogenic study  Armor, helmets, ballistic face masks, bullet vest  Parts and components of bicycle and canoe  Motorcyclist safety clothing  Nike shoe and socks >> Elite II series  Batman suits
  • 6. Nomex © Aka Poly-meta- phenylene isophthalamide Meta-amid (aromatic polyamide) synthetic fiber polymer Created by Dr Wilfred [-CO-C6H4-CO-NH-C6H4-NH-]n Sweeny in 1967 at DuPont Synthesized from 1,3- diamonobenzene and isophthaloyl chloride in condensation reaction
  • 7. Nomex © Characteristics  Tough, woven structure that is strong and light (slightly lower than Kevlar)  Specific gravity: 1.38  High heat resistant and poor electricity conductor  Does not melt at high temperature  Resists attacks from acid, base and chemicals (better than Kevlar)  Better resistance against UV light  Does not react with water  Can be ignited but can be put out easily
  • 8. Nomex © Other Applications:  Fire and heat barrier suits for astronauts and racing drivers  Electrical insulator for electrical equipments like motor, generator and transformer  Honeycomb-structured paper
  • 9. Polybenzimidazole Aka PBI Synthetic fiber polymer Synthesized from 3,3’,4,4’- tetraaminobiphenyl and diphenyl isophthaloyl in (C20N4H12)n step-growthreaction
  • 10. Polybenzimidazole Characteristics  Strong and light (but lower than Kevlar and Nomex)  Tensile strength: 160 MPa  Specific gravity: 1.30  High heat resistant and low electricity conductor  Mildly resist attacks from acid, base and chemicals  Better resistance against UV light than Kevlar and Nomex  Does not react with water  Does not readily ignite
  • 11. Polybenzimidazole Other Applications:  Aircraft wall fabric  High temperature protective gloves  Welder’s apparel  Braided packing