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De Wijkwizard

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Presentatie van de Wijkwizard (the neighbourhoudwizard) at the DDSS conference 2006

Presentatie van de Wijkwizard (the neighbourhoudwizard) at the DDSS conference 2006

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  • 1. Léon van Berlo / Jos van Leeuwen The Neighbourhood Wizard Cause and effect of changes in urban neighbourhoods
  • 2. Agenda
    • Introduction
    • Objective
    • Approach
    • (Experiencing) Liveability
    • Data Collection
    • Knowledge representation
    • Prototype
    • Evaluation and testing
    • Conclusions and future work
    • Coffee break
  • 3. Introduction
    • Quality of the neighbourhood (physical and social)  Increasingly important
    • Local initiatives for neighbourhood improvement
    • Municipalities support these initiatives  Citizen participation
    • Issues:
      • Inhabitants focus on their own problems (not the ones from their neighbours)
      • Inhabitants don’t see the complex dependencies of a decision
      • Inhabitants give concrete proposals for change in stead of their desire
  • 4. Objective
    • Making citizens realise what the consequences are of their ideas for changes
    • By developing a tool that allows citizens to:
      • propose changes to their neighbourhood;
      • assess the quality of these changes
  • 5. Approach
    • Find a set of indicators for experience of liveability of the neighbourhood
    • Find a set of characteristics that affect the liveability
    • Determine a BBN that represents the knowledge
    • Build a prototype
      • Narrowing its scope to the plaza type of habitat
    • Testing the prototype in the Dutch city of ’s‑Hertogenbosch
  • 6. Experiencing liveability: Leidelmeijer and Marsman 1999
  • 7. Example experience by an individual Appreciation Importance Satisfaction Liveability Characteristics
  • 8. Example experience by an individual
  • 9. Example experience by an individual
  • 10. Experience by another individual
  • 11. Grouping individuals and their needs
    • Wishprofiles:
      • Teenagers
      • Yuppies
      • Families
      • Elderly
      • Handicapped (elderly)
    • Aspects:
      • Space
      • Liveliness
      • Security
      • Quality
      • Status
      • Traffic
  • 12. Data Collection
    • Questionnaire of liveability regarding the city of ’s‑Hertogenbosch
    • Experiences of characteristics such as:
        • ‘public furnishing’
        • ‘available facilities’
        • ‘public accessibility’
        • ‘status’
        • ‘appearance’
        • ‘ambiance’
        • etc.
    • For plazas, over 40 characteristics were included.
    • Scale of seven possible values
      • Ranging from deficient, through moderate and neutral, to ample and excessive.
  • 13. Data Collection Example: Form and function: Incoherent Suitable surprising conflicting
  • 14. Knowledge Representation
    • Bayesian Network:
      • Can deal with uncertainty and interdependent variables
    • Determining the structure of a BN:
      • 1) Knowledge expert who constructs a network
      • 2) Examining data from the particular domain
    • In this project 2 is used to come to a base network which was refined by 1.
  • 15. Structural Learning
    • Hugin (www.hugin.com) was used with:
      • PC algorithm (Peter & Clark)
      • NPC algorithm (Necessary Path Condition)
    • Constraint-based learning algorithms
    • Derive conditional independence and dependence statements by performing statistical tests on pairs of variables in the data set
  • 16. BN Structure (1)
  • 17. Structural Learning
    • PC and NPC  same results
    • Significance level 0.05 – 0.03 – 0.01
    • Difference in ‘real relationships’ and ‘relationships in the data’
    • Defining relations that are not in the data: no use
  • 18. BN Structure (2)
  • 19. Prototype
    • User-interaction focused on a task assigned to the user
      • Users can experience this like a game
    • Representing the effects of changes
    • Representing the desired states of the aspects for different sections of the population
    • Availability of the system on Internet
    • Easy to use interface and obvious navigation
  • 20. Changing elements:
    • Three ways:
      • 1) Drawing
      • 2) Picking from a list
      • 3) Cheating
  • 21. Changing elements: 1 (drawing)
  • 22. Changing elements: 2 (picking from a list)
  • 23. Changing elements: 3 (cheating)
  • 24. Presentation of Predicted Effects
    • Three levels:
      • 1) Simple  does not give desired effect
      • 2) Normal
      • 3) Expert
  • 25. Presentation of Predicted Effects: 2 (normal)
  • 26. Presentation of Predicted Effects: 2 (normal)
  • 27. Presentation of Predicted Effects: 3 (expert)
  • 28. Presentation of Predicted Effects: 3 (expert)
  • 29. Evaluation
    • www.WijkWizard.nl (dutch)
    • Tested and evaluated by inhabitants of the city of ’s‑Hertogenbosch.
    • Online evaluation form.
    • “ Thanks to the Neighbourhood Wizard, I now see that certain ideas are positive for me, but negative for other members of our community” : 7.4
    • “ The Neighbourhood Wizard shows me that changes can have positive effects on one aspect, but negative effects on other aspects” : 7.0
    • Confirmed the educational function of the prototype!
  • 30. Conclusions (+)
    • The Neighbourhood Wizard helps users to see that certain ideas are positive for them, but negative for other sections of the population;
    • The Neighbourhood Wizard shows users that changes can have positive effects on one aspect, but negative effects on other aspects;
    • The Neighbourhood Wizard helps users to realize the complexity of a design task and as a result users will have a better informed view on plan proposals and probably a higher appreciation of plans.
  • 31. Conclusions (-)
    • Design of the user interface
    • Navigation structure (too many clicks)
    • Abstract terms
      • Inclusion of more concrete elements (number of parking lots) can help take away long-living irritations that inhabitants may have
    • The data collection is restricted to physical characteristics
  • 32. Future work
    • Investigate the relations between characteristics in depth
    • (developing a technique that) Includes explanations of the effects
      • In some cases the predictions are not so obvious and require further explanation
      • For example: The creation of a quiet plaza has negative effects on the safety of the plaza. This is not a logical, though correct, prediction because the quietness of a plaza will attract criminal behaviour
  • 33. Thank you
    • Questions or coffee break?
    Leon.vanBerlo@tno.nl / WijkWizard.nl j.p.v.leeuwen@tue.nl / www.ddss.nl

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